St Mary’s Diocesan School for Girls St Mary's DSG is a dynamic, unique school that offers each girl an educational package which will provide for her optimal development in all fields http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/ St Mary Matters Volume 18, Issue 6 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=442081 St Mary Matters Volume 18, Issue 5 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=436198 St Mary Matters Volume 18, Issue 4 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=434444 Kiepersol House

 

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St Mary’s Matters - Vol 18 Issue 3 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=434424 Debtors Policy Debtors Policy:

Debtors Policy - (340 KB)

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 18, Issue 2 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=433128 St Mary's Matters Vol 18, Issue 1 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=430100 Grade 4 - 7 2018 Extra Mural Timetable

Season 1

23 January – 23 March

Monday

06h00 – 07h00

Tuesday

06h00 – 07h00

Wednesday

06h00 – 07h00

Thursday

06h00 – 07h00

Friday

06h00 – 07h00

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Team Swimming

C & D teams

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Team Swimming

C & D teams

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Monday

14h15- 15h00

Tuesday

14h15 -15h30

Wednesday

14h15 – 15h00

Thursday

14h15 -15h30

Friday

13h15 - 17h00

Team Swimming C & D

14h15 – 15h15

Team Swimming A & B

14h15 – 15h15

Galas 

Team Swimming A & B

15h15 – 16h15

Team Swimming C & D

15h15 – 16h15

Tennis (Module)

Tennis (Module)

Squash (Module)

Squash (Module)

Volleyball

(Recreational)

Volleyball

(Recreational)

Learn to Swim *

14h40 – 15h40

Learn to Swim *

14h40 – 15h40

Season 2

26 March – 22 June

Monday

14h15- 15h00

Tuesday

14h15 -15h30

Wednesday

14h15 – 15h00

Thursday

14h15 -15h30

Friday

13h15 - 17h00

Hockey

Hockey

Hockey Matches

Netball

Netball

Season 3

2 July – 4 August

Monday

14h15- 15h00

Tuesday

14h15 -15h30

Wednesday

14h15 – 15h00

Thursday

14h15 -15h30

Friday

13h15 - 17h00

Soccer

Soccer

Hockey Matches

Hockey

Hockey

Tennis (Module)

Tennis (Module)

Squash (Module)

Squash (Module)

Season 4: 4 – 28 September

Season 5: 1 October – 30 November


Monday

06h00 – 07h00

Tuesday

06h00 – 07h00

Wednesday

06h00 – 07h00

Thursday

06h00 – 07h00

Friday

06h00 – 07h00

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Team Swimming

C & D teams

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Team Swimming

C & D teams

Team Swimming

A & B teams

Monday

14h15- 15h00

Tuesday

14h15 -15h30

Wednesday

14h15 – 15h00

Thursday

14h15 -15h30

Friday

13h15 - 17h00

Athletics

4-28 September

Athletics

4-28 September

Athletic Meetings (September)


Galas 

Team Swimming C & D

14h15 – 15h15

Team Swimming A & B

14h15 – 15h15

Basketball

Basketball

Tennis (Module)

Tennis (Module)

Squash (Module)

Squash (Module)

Learn to Swim *

14h40 – 15h40

Learn to Swim *

14h40 – 15h40


Please note:

  • Activities marked with an * are offered at an additional cost to parents
    • All girls are required to take part in a sport and a cultural/music activity per week. 
  • Girls will register for their activities in the first week of school. 
  • Prep will be available Monday – Thursday. 
  • Please see next page for non-seasonal extra mural programme and contact details. 


Season 1-5 

January – November 

Monday

14h15- 15h00

Tuesday

14h15 -15h30

Wednesday

14h15 – 15h00

Thursday

14h15 -15h30

Friday

13h15 - 17h00

Prep

Prep

Prep

Prep

Music Lessons *


Music Theory *

Kids Lit Quiz 

5V classroom 

Sport as per 

Season 

Orchestra

Sport as per 

Season

Eco Club

5M classroom

Cooks’ Corner (SvdW)

12 x Gr 7s ; until 16h00

Poetry Club Art room 

Beginner Music Theory * - PAC 

Photography Club

GW classroom

Intermediate Music

Theory * - PAC

Coding Club 

Computer Lab


Culture Club 

7M classroom 

Chess LdP classroom

Young Engineers

Mini-Lab (DC)

Maths Club CK classroom 

Entrepreneurs Club

5G classroom

TedEd Club

4B classroom

Reporters Club

7E classroom 

Choir – Chapel

Marimbas – PAC

Drama * Creative Space

15h15 -16h00

15h30 -16h30

15h15 -16h00

15h30 -16h30

Tennis team

Tennis team

Tennis team

Tennis team

Squash team 

Squash team 

Squash team 

Squash team 

Music Lessons* PAC

Music Lessons*

PAC

Music Lessons* PAC

Music Lessons*

PAC

Ballet & Modern (Gym)

Ballet & Modern (Gym)

Mandarin*

Beginner 15:15-16:00

Advanced 16:00-16:45

(4R Classroom)

Advanced Music

Theory * 

Fugard room

String Ensemble

PAC (16:15-17:15)

Drama * 

Creative Space

French * 

SvdW classroom 


Aftercare

15h15 – 18h00

Aftercare

14h00 – 18h00

Aftercare

15h15 – 18h00

Aftercare

14h00 – 18h00

Aftercare

13h15 – 18h00


ADDITIONAL COST” EXTRA MURAL ACTIVITIES CONTACT DETAILS 

Ballet CECHETTI and Modern

Mrs Beverley Acquisto

082 377 6222

acquisto@telkomsa.net

Ballet Gr 1 – 3 – R285.00 per month

Modern and Hip Hop – R260 per month

Drama Club

Mrs Natasha Markou

072 212 2252

littlecproductions@gmail.com

Grade 0-7 – R700.00 per term and R100 registration fee

Mandarin

Andries Opperman


0846857122

pretoriachinese@gmail.com


R100/lesson

Music


Celia Burger



012 366 0500 x103

ceburger@stmarys.pta.school.za

uhancock@stmarys.pta.school.za


Various teachers

Learn to Swim / Private Lessons

Daleen Nel

082 787 7750

swimschool@mweb.co.za

R1 080/term for 1 lesson/week

R1 290/term for 2 lessons/week

French 

Femke du Plessis

078 814 8663

femidupi@hotmail.com

Equestrian 

(Horse Riding)

A Watson

awatson@stmarys.pta.school.za



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Grade 1 - 3 2018 Extra Mural Schedule


Monday

13h45 -14h45

Tuesday

13h45 -14h45

Wednesday

13h45 -14h45

Thursday

13h45 -14h30

Friday

13h15 – 17h00

Season 1

23 January –

23 March

Team Swimming

Group 1: 13h45 – 14h30

Group 2: 14h30 – 15h15

Learn to Swim *

Team Swimming

Group 1: 13h45 – 14h30

Group 2: 14h30 – 15h15

Learn to Swim *

Galas

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3 :14h15 – 15h00

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3:14h15 – 15h00

Tennis

Tennis

Ball games

Ball games

Season 2

26 March –

22 June

Hockey

Learn to Swim *

Hockey

Learn to Swim *

Hockey and

Netball

Festivals on Saturdays

Netball

Netball

Season 3

2 July –

4 August

Athletics


Athletics



Tennis

Tennis

Soccer

Soccer

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3 :14h15 – 15h00

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3 :14h15 – 15h00

Season 4

4 September –

30 November

Team Swimming

Group 1: 13h45 – 14h30

Group 2: 14h30 – 15h15

Learn to Swim *

Team Swimming

Group 1: 13h45 – 14h30

Group 2: 14h30 – 15h15

Learn to Swim *

Galas

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3 :14h15 – 15h00

Squash

Gr 1&2:13h45 - 14h15

Gr 3:14h15 – 15h00

Tennis

Tennis

Basketball

Basketball

PLEASE NOTE:


  • Activities marked with an * are offered at an additional cost to parents
  • Gade 1-3 girlsare required to take part ina sportand acultural activity per week and they need to attend all the sessions.
  • It is compulsory for all Gr 1-3 girls to play either hockey or netball in Season 2.
  • With the exception of Music lessons and drama, all paying extra mural activities will start at 15h00. Girls may continue with music lessons after 16:00.
  • Girls will register for their activities in the first week of term.



Please see next page for non-seasonal extra mural programme and contact details.




Monday

13h45 -14h45

Tuesday

13h45 -14h45

Wednesday

13h45 -14h45

Thursday

13h45 -14h30

Friday

13h15 – 17h00

Season 1 – 4

(January – November)



Beginner Music Theory*

Fugard room

13h45 – 14h15

14h15 – 14h45


Science Club Science Lab (TP)

Music lessons*

PAC

Eco Club 3N classroom(JN)

Writers’ Club TM classroom

Chess3H classroom(MH)

Rhythmic Gymnastics*

14h30-15h15(Gym)

JAM – Jesus and Me

1U classroom (LU)

Music Lessons *PAC

Music Appreciation

Music room (KF)


ChoirChapel(HJ)

Kids Lit/Book Club

1M classroom(KM)

Computer Club

Computer lab(CT)

Music Lessons *

Drama *Creative Space

Learn to Swim *

Intermediate Music Theory *

Fugard room13h45 – 14h30

Monday

15h00 -16h00

Tuesday

15h00 -16h00

Wednesday

15h00 -16h00

Thursday

15h00 -16h00

Music lessons*(PAC)

Music lessons*(PAC)

Music lessons*(PAC)

Music lessons*(PAC)

Ballet and Modern*

(Gym)

Rhythmic Gymnastics*

15h30 -16h15 (Gym)

Ballet and Modern*

(Gym)

Rhythmic Gymnastics*

15h00 -16h30 (Gym)

Miki Maths *

Learn to Swim *

Season 1 & 4

Mandarin*

Drama *Creative Space

Golf *

French*

Suzuki Ensemble*

Learn to Swim *

Season 1 & 4

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Grade 0 2018 Extra Mural Timetable


Monday

13h15-13h45

Tuesday

13h15-13h45

Wednesday

13h15-13h45

Thursday

13h15-13h45

Friday

13h15-13h45

Term

1 & 3

Swimming

Learn to Swim *

Swimming

Learn to Swim *



Term

2

Ball Skills


Ball Skills




Term 1-3

Ballet *

Gym)

Music lessons*

(PAC)

Ballet *

(Gym)

Drama (GP)

Music lessons *

(PAC)

Music lessons*

(PAC)

Mini Netball *

Eco Club (FP)

FP Choir

13h45 – 14h30

Miki Maths *

(0G Class room)

Rhythmic gymnastics*

13:15-13:45

13:50-14:20

Music lessons*

(PAC)

Golf*

14h00 – 15h00

Rhythmic gymnastics*

13h15-13h45

13h50-14h20

Music lessons*(PAC)

Drama*

15h00-16h00

After Care

13h00- 18h00

After Care

13h00- 18h00

After Care

13h00- 18h00

After Care

13h00- 18h00

After Care

13h00- 18h00

 

Please note:

  • Extra Mural school activities highlighted in green, yellow and pink, are offered atNOadditional cost.
  • Activities marked with an*are offered at an additional cost to parents.
  • Grade 0 Extra muralscommence on 1 Februaryso as to allow girls to settle in.
  • Extra murals are optional in Grade 0 and may change every term.
  • All activities on this timetable may commence at 13h15.

 



ADDITIONAL COST” EXTRA MURAL ACTIVITIES CONTACT DETAILS

 

Ballet CECHETTI and Modern

Beverley Acquisto

082 377 6222

acquisto@telkomsa.net

R860/term

Drama Club

Natasha Markou

072 212 2252

littlecproductions@gmail.com

Grade 0-7 – R700.00 per term and R100 registration fee

Miki Maths

Wally Thiele

0827102423

wally@mikimaths.com

Grade 0-3 – R860,00 per term and R110 registration fee

Music

Celia Burger

012 366 0500 x103

ceburger@stmarys.pta.school.za

uhancock@stmarys.pta.school.za

Various teachers

Rhythmic Gymnastics

Nina

0836479096

nervedosa@yahoo.com

R1 100/term for 1 lesson per week

Playgolf

Terence Westcott

082 307 5050

Terence@playgolfkids.co.za

Gr 0-3 –R995,00 per term

All equipment provided

Private swimming /

Learn to swim

Daleen Nel

082 787 7750

swimschool@mweb.co.za

R1 080/term for 1 lesson/week

R1 290/term for 2 lessons/week

Mini netball

Dawnita Benade

083 4590182

dawnita.benadie@gmail.com

R210/month

Registration fee R200

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#SmartGirls

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Transformation and Diversity
Transformation and Diversity charter - (216KB)
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Parents’ association constitution Parents’ association constitution - (807 KB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=430046 Welcome ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=430042 Values VALUES AT ST MARY’S DSG

RESPECT FOR GOD and the spiritual traditions of the school

  • Means honouring God in our communal worship services and in our individual lives
  • Means humbly seeking to be Christ-like in all our relationships
  • Means encouraging spiritual growth and the development of a personal faith in God
  • Means generously offering our lives in service to God and his people
  • Means to make an effort to understand and respect other people’s religions.
  • Means showing kindness and love to others.
  • Means to remain quiet and behave appropriately and reverently in a place of worship
  • Means to participate actively in Chapel services and acts of worship e.g. singing enthusiastically.

RESPECT FOR SELF

  • Means we are uniquely created and therefore respect our bodies
  • Means we must do the best we can in caring for our mind, body and soul

SELF-CONFIDENCE

  • Means acknowledging who we are and presenting ourselves in a valuable way.
  • Means to have pride in what we do but still be humble.
  • Means to resist peer pressure

RESPONSIBILITY

  • Means to take responsibility for our own actions rather than blaming others
  • Means to acknowledge and accept the consequences of any misdemeanour we have committed.
  • Means to set a good example to our peers and to behave in a responsible and reliable manner

HONESTY

  • Means to ensure that our assignments are our own work.
  • Means being truthful whilst showing sensitivity to others

COMMITMENT

  • Means to keep working towards improvement in all areas of our lives
  • Means to try our best to be positive
  • Means to complete our homework and hand it in on time.
  • Means to do the tasks assigned to the best of our ability
  • Means once a commitment has been made it should be taken seriously
  • Means being accountable for our own behaviour and decisions

 RESPECT FOR OTHERS

  • Means working for what is good for the school community
  • Means to show sympathy for others and encourage our peers positively.
  • Means to greet and be courteous towards all of whom we come into contact with.
  • Means to respect the belongings of others.
  • Means to help each other when we can see someone who is in need of help.
  • Means to support each other in standing up for what is right
  • Means to respect other people’s privacy

TOLERANCE

  • Means everyone has a right to their own viewpoint, although we do not support viewpoints which go against other DSG values
  • Means to be patient.
  • Means to allow everyone to express their views and opinions without discrimination.
  • Means to understand people instead of judging them.

CO-OPERATION

  • Means working fairly together
  • Means working in teams to achieve shared goals
  • Means to share ideas and help find joint and creative solutions.
  • Means to work together as one community.

EQUALITY

Means we support justice for all people

  • Means people have equal opportunities
  • Means to treat others as we would like to be treated.
  • Means not to discriminate for any reason against anyone.

SCHOOL PRIDE

  • Means taking pride in our school and work.
  • Means honouring and upholding our school’s values.
  • Means to wear our uniform with pride and carry ourselves in a manner respectful to ourselves and others.
  • Means to respect the privileges and traditions of the school e.g. standing aside for older people.
  • Means to respect and adhere to the school rules, which basically ensures that we will respect our environment, peers, religion, cultures, parents, teachers and school.
  • Means to have a positive outlook towards ourselves, our school and others.
  • Means to spread a positive image of our school to people outside DSG.
  • Means to remember that everything we do outside of school bears consequences and stays with us forever.
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Overview Built on the Christian (Anglican) faith, shared values, holistic excellence, and deep tradition…

VISION

St Mary’s DSG aims to empower confident yet humble women of Integrity and character to serve our nation and the world.

MISSION

  • to be a community where care, compassion and service abound, internally and externally.
  • to search for academic excellence through hard work, critical thinking, creativity and innovation.
  • to offer a wide variety of opportunities in sport and culture, deliberately exposing learners to life and leadership.
  • to use information technology effectively to enhance learning and prepare learners for the  unknown future.
  • to provide a home of beauty, safety and vibrancy for all.
  • to exercise exemplary environmental responsibility.
  • to be known for the expertise and confidence of our alumnae.

VALUES

The values embraced by the girls, parents and staff of St Mary’s DSG include:

  •  A strong commitment to Christian (Anglican) beliefs
  •  An appreciation of the sound tradition built over more than a century
  •  An appreciation of every girl as an individual
  •  A caring environment

The school has a three-term year. Term dates vary from year to year, but are approximately as follows:

Term 1 - mid-January to early April

Term 2 - early May to early August

Term 3 - early September to early December

The academic day starts at 07:30 for all pupils. Extra-mural and sporting activities take place in the afternoons and on some Saturday mornings.

 The School is divided into four Houses - St Andrew, St George, St David and St Patrick. Inter-House competitions take place in all sports as well as in other activities such as music, drama, public speaking and quizzes.

 

THE CHAPEL

The Christian ethics espoused by the Bishop and Sisters from the outset have been handed down over the years and remain at the heart of our teaching philosophy, with daily acts of worship and chapel services co-ordinated by our resident Chaplain.

As an Anglican school, St Mary's aims to deepen an awareness of the love of God and to encourage spiritual growth. While girls of other denominations and faiths are welcome at St Mary's, all pupils are required to attend Divinity classes, daily acts of worship and certain other compulsory chapel services.

Voluntary services, including Mass, are celebrated regularly; these provide ample opportunity for girls to further their worship. The Sunday services are compulsory for boarders, but daygirls and parents are always welcome to attend.
The Chaplain prepares girls for confirmation. Girls are encouraged to participate actively in the worship. Many serve in other ways as sacristans, servers or choir members.

 

The School Prayer

Lord Jesus, Child of Bethlehem,
bless our school and all its members, past and present.
Be with us in our worship,
in our work and in our play.
Inspire the hearts of those who teach
and of those who learn;
train those who rule and those who obey,
that all may offer Thee the perfect service
which is worthy of Thy Love.
Who livest and reignest with the Father
and the Holy Spirit, ever one God,
world without end.
Amen.

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History St Mary’s DSG:  FOUNDED IN 1879

 

St Mary’s Diocesan School for Girls, which was originally known as St Etheldreda’s, was founded by Bishop Bousfield, the first Bishop of Pretoria, in 1879.  Initially it was situated at No 279 Skinner Street, but after about 40 years, it moved to its present site in Hillcrest.

Formal education for women was not considered important in the 1880s.  What had started as a school for the Bishop’s six young daughters, who were privately tutored in his home, “Bishopscote,” by Miss Elizabeth Dowling, the first headmistress, soon became too small for the 20 pupils who were on the register by 1886.  A move was made to a house in Koch Street, but even those facilities became inadequate for the 75 pupils of 1889.  It was then that land was bought in Skinner Street and St Etheldreda’s was built.  The cost of the building was £1,500, of which only £300 was immediately available; the rest was raised by the Bishop and other friends of the School.  By 1895, there were 138 pupils and nine academic members of staff.

The growth of the School was sadly stunted by the onslaught of war:  the Anglo-Boer War of 1899 – 1902.  In 1902 Bishop Bousfield died and all seemed lost.  The Headmistress resigned, staff returned to England and only 25 pupils remained at St Etheldreda’s.  The Education Department suggested that the school buildings might be used as a hostel for the newly-established Pretoria High School for Girls.

When Bishop William Carter was appointed second Bishop of Pretoria (1903-1909), he fervently opposed the absorbing of Church schools by the government.  It was his inspiration that saved our school: he invited the Community of St Mary the Virgin from Wantage in England to take it over – and the Community accepted.  However, they were not able to send Sisters to South Africa until September 1903, so for nine months Miss Grenfell kept the school going.  Finally, the great day came when the first four Sisters arrived at Pretoria Station: 7 September 1903.  A new era dawned, during which the school developed into an efficient and highly-regarded institution under the capable and loving guidance of the Sisters.  Tribute, however, must be paid to those gallant Headmistresses who, for the previous 23 years, kept St Etheldreda’s afloat on the storm-tossed seas of national and educational turbulence.  The name “St Etheldreda’s” was not heard after the war, and in time the School became known as “St Mary’s Diocesan School for Girls” or the “DSG.”

The years that followed were filled with stories of growth.  The School at Skinner Street was full to overflowing, much to the delight but also consternation of the third Bishop of Pretoria, Bishop Furse, and Sister Alice, who together dreamed of a “Promised Land” – somewhere where there was space to move and grow.  The purchase and development of such a site, formerly a portion of the farm Hartebeestepoort belonging to Mr Frank Struben, was a journey of faith; a vision realised.  From 1921, when the “Promised Land” was purchased, to 1926 when the foundation stone was laid, to 1928 when the new building was ready for occupation, the school grew from strength to strength.  Countless generations of little girls (and boys until the 1950s) passed through the gates of the DSG on their way in life, shepherded by the firm, but loving nurturing of the Sisters, assisted by dedicated lay staff.

Sadly, the day came when the era of the Sisters of the Community of St Mary the Virgin (CSMV) drew to a close.  Sunday 30 November 1975 will be remembered as a day of great thanksgiving for the 72 years of devoted service offered to the school by these women of faith.  The Rev Hugh Brown took up the reins as Headmaster and guided St Mary’s DSG into a new era of growth and development.  The celebration of the School’s centenary in 1979 was a joyful reminder of the importance of the Christian ethos that has inspired the “hearts of those who teach and those who learn” (Part of the School Prayer).  The role of the Chaplain and the central position of the Chapel continue to give focus and opportunities for spiritual formation.

The year 2004 gave the School a further opportunity to celebrate: 125 years of the best that a holistic education has to offer!   

“That is the wonderful thing about our School.  We will not leave DSG behind completely.  It is like home: you do not always have to be there, but the knowledge that it will always be there is what really matters.”  Mieke Botes: Head Girl 2002]]>
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Governing Body Role The Governing Body of St Mary’s DSG (Pretoria), elected according to the Constitution of St Mary’s DSG, is responsible for overall policy and strategy of the School, ensuring sound financial management which will further the objectives of the school as set out in the Constitution.

The Constitution is approved by the Synod of the Diocese of Pretoria of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa.

High priority is given to sound governance in accordance with the principles outlined in the King Reports.

The Governing Body meets 5 or 6 times a year. An Executive of the Governing Body is elected to manage the school on a daily basis and includes members responsible for Finance, Lands and Buildings, Marketing, Risk Management, Legal issues etc. Constitutionally the Governor’s Executive, chaired by the duly elected Vice Chair of the Governing Body, is required to meet 8 times a year.

 

GOVERNING BODY 2018

Chairman                         The Rt Revd Allan Kannemeyer

 

Vice-Chairman and          Ms Fay Mukaddam

Chairman of Executive

 

Executive members:        Ms Fay Mukaddam (Chair)

Mrs Mathebe Aphane

Mrs Lizell Reinecke

Mrs Sharon Smulders

 

Governors:                   

Mrs Nadira Bayat

Mr Ronnie Gell

Mrs Di Gibbs

Mrs Ntsiki Gumbe

Mr Shawn Maphalla

Mrs Judith Miller (co-opted)

Mrs Wallis Plummer

Mr Marc Serrurier

Mr Dion Shango

Ms Cecilia van der Merwe

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Facilities

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Matric Results 2017 Matric Results 2017 - (300KB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=428593 St Mary's Matters - Volume 17, Issue 9 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=428590 St Mary's Matters - Volume 17, Issue 8 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=428588 St Mary's Matters - Volume 17, Issue 7 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=428586 St Mary's Matters - Volume 17, Issue 6 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=422602 POLICY REGARDING ACCOLADES

ACADEMIC:

- A Grade 8 & Grade 9 pupil needs to collect 10 merits to receive an invite to the accolades tea.

- A Grade 10 - 12 pupil needs to collect 7 merits to receive an invite to the accolades tea.

- Accolades tea will be held in the last week of the month.

- Grade 10 to 12 on Tuesdays and grades 8 and 9 on Wednesdays.

- Merits are handed in weekly to the tutor who will send the data to the senior school reception’s secretary.

- Merits are collated by the secretary who will compile a list in House order.

- A letter will be sent to all parents if the pupil is invited to the accolades tea-for their information.

- The 4 houses accumulate accolades throughout the year and the merits go towards house points for the overall house trophy at prize giving.

- A prize goes to the pupil who accumulates the most accolades throughout the year.

 

Merits:

- Merits are only awarded for full length (major) tests and assignments.

- The pupil must get 80% or improve by 10% from the previous best assessment.

- Exceptional effort on major individual assignments.

- No merits for peer assessment tests.

- Merits for oral/practical work must be the equivalent of a "major" test.

- Merits must be given by all. Consistency, as far as possible, should apply.

- There should be a normal spread of results in the test.

 

OTHER:

- If a pupil excels in any other sphere of school life she will be invited to an accolades tea.

- Staff members can send names and achievements through to the Vice-Principal: Academics who will make the selection.

J Miller 2017

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 17, Issue 5 St Mary's Matters - Volume 17 Issue 5 ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=422302 Week four ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=400621 Week three ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=400620 Week two ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=400619 Week one ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=400610 Calendar 2018 Term 1

Start:   Wednesday 17 January
Close:   Wednesday 11 April

Half-term:  12:00 Thursday 1 March
Return to school:  Tuesday 6 March

Public holiday: Wednesday 21 March (Human Rights Day)
   
   


Term 2

Start:   Wednesday 2 May
Close:   Friday 3 August

Half-term:  Normal closing:  Friday 22 June
Return to school:  Monday 2 July

Public Holiday: Saturday 16 June (Youth Day)
   


Term 3

Start:   Tuesday 4 September
Close:   Thursday 6 December

Half-term:  12:00 Thursday 18 October
Return to school:  Tuesday 23 October

Public Holiday:  Monday 24 September (Heritage Day)


 

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Matric Results 2016 Matric Results 2016 - (850 KB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=400604 Contract Application Form - Music 2017 Contract Application Form - Music 2017 - (233KB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=356877 IsiZulu IsiZulu

There are many reasons for studying Zulu, including personal interest in southern African cultures, research interests and fulfilment of foreign language requirements. In addition, Zulu has great political, cultural, historical and social importance in southern Africa. Zulu spread throughout large areas of southern Africa and the language served as a tool for unifying the many ethnic groups found there. Another advantage of studying Zulu is that it forms the basis for understanding the other Nguni languages. If you can speak Zulu, you can invariably understand Swati, Ndebele and Xhosa.

In the future, students who are hoping to be part of any South African workplace will benefit from knowing at least one indigenous language. They will earn respect and find it easier to communicate with all the people they will come across and deal with in their daily business. It is even more vital for those who are interested in travelling and working internationally. When one calls oneself proudly South African, one is somewhat expected to be able to share their knowledge of an indigenous language; it does not create a good impression if one does not know how to speak at least one indigenous language of the country where one was born and raised.

Course Outline

To broaden and deepen language competencies so that learners are able to listen, speak, read, view, write and present with confidence - this forms a basis for life-long learning.

We hope to enable our girls to:

Use language appropriately in real-life contexts.

Express and justify their own ideas, views and emotions confidently in order to become independent and analytical thinkers.

Use language and their imagination to represent and explore human experience.

Use language to access and manage information for learning across the curriculum.

Use language as a tool for critical and creative thinking.

Express reasoned opinions on ethical issues and values.

Interact critically with a wide range of texts.

Recognise the unequal status of different languages and language varieties.

Assessment and Examinations

There is continuous assessment of oral and written work in normal class situations.

Writing is assessed continuously across a range of different tasks such as language and comprehension exercises as well as creative, transactional and functional writing.

• Class tests and standardised tests are written regularly.

• Homework and assignments are given regularly.

• Projects are given termly.

Examinations
Paper I hours [100]
Paper II hours [100]
Continuous assessment: Portfolio [100]
Oral   [100]

Skills Taught

Basic language skills such as listening, speaking, reading and writing and research.

Language is the best tool for instilling life skills such as critical thinking, analysing, problem-solving, initiative, etc. 

Special events

Visiting cultural villages

The IsiZulu evening

The IsiZulu Olympiad

Traditional dance, music, poetry etc.

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Staffing in the Senior School

Senior School - Academic

Name

Responsibilities

Email Address

Fr A W Paterson

Head of School

frpaterson@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs J Miller

Vice-Head Academics

jmiller@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M Neser

Vice-Head Student Affairs

mneser@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs T Beukes

Head of History

tbeukes@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M Booysen

Teacher: Afrikaans

mbooysen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms I Botha

Head of Physical Science

lbotha@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms L Bothma

Head of Information Technology

lbothma@stmarys.pta.school.za

Miss J Brown

Head of Geography,

jbrown@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs C Burger

Director of Music

cburger@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs C de Villiers

Head of Life Orientation

cdevilliers@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms C Downard

Teacher: English

cdownard@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs H Druce

Teacher: French

hdruce@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs J Eiselen

Learning Area Head Mathematics and Business, Head of Mathematics

jeiselen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs S Erasmus

Head of Business Studies

serasmus@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs B Fineberg

Learning Area Head Science and Technology, Head of Life Science

bfineberg@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs S Govender

Learning Technologies Facilitator

sgovender@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mr S Grobler

Teacher: Accounting

sgrobler@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs N Hans

Teacher: Life Sciences

nhans@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M Jorissen

Teacher: Afrikaans

mjorissen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs H Khwinana

Head of Sepedi

hkhwinana@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs K Kladis

Teacher: Mathematics

kkladis@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs J Knight

Learning Area Head Arts and Culture, Head of Visual Arts

jknight@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mr L Knoetze

Teacher: History and Geography

lknoetze@stmarys.pta.school.za

Miss I Koppeschaar

Teacher: Music

Ikoppeschaar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M Labuschagne

Teacher: Physical Science

mlabuschagne@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs H le Roux

Head of Afrikaans

hleroux@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs L le Roux

Head of Mathematical Literacy

lleroux@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mr M Msomi

Head of IsiZulu

mmsomi@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs R Narsai

Teacher: Mathematics

rnarsai@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs O Nel

Teacher: English

onel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs G Oosthuizen

Teacher: Dramatic Arts and English

goosthuizen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms A Pieterse

Teacher: Business Studies

apieterse@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs L Pollard

Head of Accounting

lpollard@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mr C Potgieter

Head of Drama

cpotgieter@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms C Rautenbach

Teacher: Life Orientation

crautenbach@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ms I Schoonraad

Intern: Drama Arts

ischoonraad@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs Y Singh

Learning Area Head Languages and Life Orientation, Head of English

ysingh@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs C Stedall

Head of Consumer Studies and Technology,

cstedall@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs S Stone

Teacher: Mathematics

sstone@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M van den Berg

Teacher: Mathematics

mvanderberg@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs K van Rooyen-Enslin

Head of French

kvanrooyen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mr T van Wyk

Teacher: Life Sciences

tvanwyk@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs I Vonkeman

Teacher: English

ivonkeman@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs M Vorster

Teacher: Consumer Studies, Technology, Art

mvorster@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mrs B Ward

Teacher: Physical Sciences

bward@stmarys.pta.school.za

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Subject Choices Subjects offered in Grade 8 and 9

Subjects in Grade 8 and 9 are taught by specialist teachers and provide a good preview of the subject content in the senior grades.

These are:

  • English
  • Afrikaans/Sepedi/Zulu/ Immigrant French
  • Life Orientation
  • Mathematics
  • Physical Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Geography
  • History
  • Economic Management Sciences (combination of Accounting, Business Studies and Economics)
  • Technology

Choice of 2 out of :

  • Art, Drama, Music or Advanced Music, French Second Additional Language

Subjects offered in Grade 10-12

The St Mary’s DSG timetable consists of 7 Keys. Applying the NSC requirements, it is compulsory for pupils to study English in Key 1, a choice of Afrikaans, Sepedi, IsiZulu or Immigrant French in Key 2, a choice of Mathematics and Mathematical Literacy in Key 3 and Life Orientation in Key 4.

Pupils then choose one subject from each of the remaining keys (Key 5, 6 and 7). Keys are determined within the constraints of time, the timetable and the staffing capacity. We attempt to offer a wide variety of possible subject combinations. The more specialised subjects with smaller numbers such as Music are sometimes allocated to a different key from year to year to accommodate the choice selection of the specific year group. It is, however, not possible to entertain combinations other than those mentioned below:

Subject keys Grade 10 -12

Key 1 Key 2 Key 3 Key 4 Key 5 Key 6 Key 7
English Afrikaans Mathematics Life Orientation Physical Science Physical Science Life Sciences

Sepedi Mathematical Literacy   Life Sciences Accounting Dramatic Arts
  IsiZulu     Business Studies Business Studies Visual Art
  Immigrant French     Dramatic Arts Consumer Studies Accounting
        Geography History French
        Music   Information Technology

Note:

Advanced Programmes:
Advanced Programme English lessons are scheduled in the afternoons. In Mathematics, the pupils are streamed and one of the classes is scheduled to be an Advanced Programme Mathematics class that runs at a faster pace during themorning timetable. Additional lessons are scheduled in the afternoons, evenings and selected weekends.

Subject choice assessments and recommendations
These are organized by the Health and Wellness Centre, with the help of a private psychologist who specialises in Subject and Career Counselling. It is usually done in April/May of the Grade 9 year.

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Visual Art Visual Art
Why take Visual Art for matric?

At the centre of all learning lies the learner’s own experience.  Arts education offers learners a unique way of exploring the world around them, expressing their own perceptions and discovering their own creative imagination.  In this sense, arts education lies at the heart of all learning!

Some of the outcomes for this subject are to:
Encourage learners to think critically about the world of images around them. This skill benefits not only artists, but designers, heritage workers, architects, photographers, teachers, town planners etc. We all rely on an ability to interpret images in a critical way.
Emphasize the value of keeping artist’s notebooks. These are a personal resource where ideas, sketches, images etc. can be stored for later use.
Explore visual phenomena and technical possibilities through practical projects, research, interviews and discussions.
Synthesize findings in a personal and meaningful way which not only benefits the individual but also the group.
Humanize ourselves through the exhibition of own work, where issues of the art-making process and representation take place.

Career Opportunities:
The following represents a synopsis in which related careers can be pursued, and some of their associated roles and work contexts:

Fine Arts (professional artists, visual arts educator, illustrator)
Advertising (art directors, copywriters, entrepreneurs, marketing, photographers)
Design and Decorating (game animation, game engineering, app design, graphic, textile, fashion, landscape, interior, product, jewellery, stage design, illustration, animation, and cartooning)
Craft (craftspeople, product developers, operations managers)
Architecture and the Built Environment (architects, town planners, landscape designers, decorators)
Arts Management and Marketing (dealers, gallerists, agents, publicists, fundraisers, project managers, the world of arts auctioneering)
Art Criticism (journalism, critics and art historians)
Public Art (small and large scale public art events, mural artists)
Curating and Conservation (curators, exhibition designers, conservators working in museums, public and private galleries and travelling exhibitions)
Education and Training (teachers, trainers, materials developers, lecturers, NGOs, community arts centres, private providers)

Some things of interest:
I recently attended a talk given by Luc Wolthers. He is a 20-year-old Redhill School Old Boy who is currently studying a course at Wits University on Gaming Design and Gaming Engineering. He has already worked for Triggerfish and Pixar -two multinational companies where he was involved with animation.
Gaming is one of the faster-growing industries in the world and one which attracts creative people who want to be a part of a very new and rapidly-evolving industry.
Last year at the St Mary’s DSG Career Evenings, two young men - Carl Jeppe and Thomas Blatcher - spoke to our students about their careers in the media industry. Both young men own their own companies which service and provide design and advertising for a wide range of clients.
I was recently fortunate to meet Dr Sarah Britten who also heads up her own media company, The Creativity Project. She spoke about ‘portfolio careers’ - a term which I had not come across before. It means that in the future, most people will have multiple careers concurrently.

Summary
There are many varied and diverse fields/branches of Art, many of which cannot be measured, tested or even touched upon at school level. Taking Art as a subject does not mean becoming an artist who works in a studio for a living - this may have been the case a few hundred years ago. Just as a student who takes Science is unlikely to become a scientist, so too, a student taking Art is unlikely to become an artist. Art teaches skills way beyond drawing etc - it inculcates life skills such as self-discipline, problem-solving, visualisation, and processing concepts creatively, learning to be comfortable with ambiguity, lateral thinking etc.

Self-discipline, hard work and a love of the subject are key factors which should motivate your choice. As is the case with all success, it requires the individual to move beyond the comfortable and to be equipped for change and multi-disciplinary careers.
 
In the words of Nelson Mandela:
“Individuality encourages creativity, creativity sparks identity, identity forms communities, communities form nations.”

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Mathematics Mathematics
At St Mary’s DSG, we encourage as many girls as possible to choose Core Mathematics.

Curriculum Outline:  Mathematics

PAPER 1
Description of content Marks (Approximate Weighting of Content Area)
Algebra and equations (and inequalities) 25
Patterns and sequences 25
Finance, growth and decay 15
Functions and graphs 35
Differential calculus 35
Probability 15
TOTAL 150

PAPER 2
Description of content Marks (Approximate Weighting of Content Area)
Bookwork (included in any of the topics listed below) 6
Statistics 20
Analytical geometry 40
Trigonometry 40
Euclidean geometry and measurement 50
TOTAL 150

Assessment and Examination
Assessment in Grades 10, 11 and 12 is modelled on the assessment structure in Grade 12.  Students are expected to complete summative assessments, as well as portfolio assessments.  25% of the final mark is made up from year work, and the final examination comprises 75% of the result.
Mathematics focuses on formal, more abstract mathematical concepts.  The current Mathematics syllabus assesses learners’ abilities equally in Algebra, Graphing, Trigonometry and Geometry, the latter having been reintroduced in the new curriculum from 2012.  Deductive thinking, required particularly in the Euclidean Geometry, is a prerequisite for many courses at tertiary level.

Enrichment and Special Events:
Participation in the South African Mathematics Olympiad
Participation in the University of Pretoria Mathematics competition
Visits to the University of Pretoria
Regular involvement of the Mathematics patron, Professor Ansie Harding
Motivational talks with a mathematical flavour
Advanced Programme Mathematics

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Music Music
“Music is the fourth great material want of our natures - first food, then raiment, then shelter, then music” – Christian Bovée”

Introduction

The Music Department at St Mary’s DSG is committed to guiding all learners who become involved in music towards discovering their full music potential, thereby enabling them to develop into well-balanced and able young musicians who find joy and fulfilment in their art and in their lives.

Subject Music
The Subject Music course is designed to serve the abovementioned purpose to the full. Selecting Music as a Subject in Grade 10 requires that a learner has done Subject Music in Grade 8 and 9. However, exceptions are made when a learner can provide other practical and theoretical qualifications which would sufficiently allow her to deal with the level required of Subject Music Learners in Grade 10 and beyond.
It is not compulsory to play a practical instrument when doing Music as a subject in Grades 8 and 9, but it is strongly advised that a learner does so.  If a learner chooses Music in Grades 8 and 9, but chooses not to play a practical instrument, she will not be allowed into the Subject Music programme in Grade 10.
 
Curriculum Outline
The Subject Music Course for Grades 10 - 12 (as prescribed by the IEB) has three outcomes:

1. Music performance and improvisation
The learner will be trained to:

Demonstrate technical control over her chosen instrument. To assess this, she will be given sight-reading, an aural test as well as scales and technical exercises.     This will be assessed in a formal practical examination each term.
Perform a minimum of three solo pieces as well as one ensemble piece. This will also be assessed in a formal practical examination each term. She will be     expected to perform one solo piece in Term 1, two solo pieces in Term 2 and three solo pieces as well as one ensemble piece in Term 3.
Write programme notes for examination pieces.
Improvise stylistically with traditional, indigenous or contemporary scales and modes.

2. Music Literacy
The learner will be trained to:

Analyse notated and / or recorded music visually.
Compose a musical work.
Use available technology to compose, arrange and present a musical work.
Apply the knowledge of harmony to harmonise a melody in four parts.
Write a melody.

3. Music Knowledge and Analysis
The learner will be trained to:

Critically evaluate representative examples of music.
Compare different styles of music.

Positive aspects
There are a number of positive aspects that the curriculum content offers:

A far more inclusive approach that allows anyone who truly desires to participate in Music as a subject, to do so.
A wider knowledge of Music as a whole. The subject caters for a wide variety of styles and genres, including jazz, indigenous music, rock and pop, musicals     and western classical music.
The subject content is current. Aspects such as Music Technology, Recording, Music Rights and Music Promotion, Marketing and Events Organisation are        included in the curriculum.

Skills Taught
Through its practice, Music engenders sought-after qualities that are synonymous with principles of true education. These become life-long and universally valuable assets:

Analysis
Creative thinking
Computer literacy
Concentration
Co-ordination
Emotional development
Fine motor control
Humanity
Insight
Instrumental performance
Self-confidence
Self-discipline
Time management

Career Paths and Opportunities
Commercial music: composition and performance
Music technology
Recording engineering
Sound engineering
Music education
Musicology
Music management
Performance: solo and group

Conclusion
The Subject Music Department at St Mary’s DSG aspires to instil confidence and commitment in what is undoubtedly a challenging but most rewarding course.
Education in music is most sovereign, because more than anything else rhythm and harmony find their way to the inmost soul and take strongest hold upon it, bringing with them and imparting grace (when) one is rightly trained - Plato

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Physical Science Physical Science
What is Physical Science?

Physical Sciences consist of Chemistry and Physics. 
Chemistry is the study of the composition, structure and properties of substances and of the transformations that they undergo, while Physics is a study of how energy and matter relate to each other.
A significant part of the work is rather abstract, especially in Chemistry.  Physics, especially, relies heavily on Mathematics.  In both Physics and Chemistry linguistic skills are of extreme importance to understand and explain complex concepts. 

Curriculum outline

Some topics that will be dealt with in Physics include mechanics, waves and electricity and magnetism.
Topics in Chemistry include chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, stoichiometry, organic chemistry, acids and bases, electrochemistry, rates of reaction and equilibrium.

Skills taught

Mechanical insight and the ability to apply knowledge and skills to new problems are essential in order to deal with the requirements in Physics.  Translation of knowledge, like representing data on tables and graphs, and interpreting graphs are important skills taught that can be applied in many other fields.
Chemistry relies a great deal on the ability to understand theories and models, which are abstract by nature.
Skills learned and knowledge gained in Physical Science will enable girls to deal a lot better with our highly technological world, whether they follow a career in Sciences, or not.

Practical

Both Physics and Chemistry have practical components that form an integral part of the subject.  In Grade 12, practical investigations contribute between 40% and 50% to the portfolio mark.  Compulsory practical investigations are one on physics and the other on chemistry.  Each of these will contribute 20% to the portfolio mark.  The alternate assessment, which could also be a practical investigation, counts another 10%.
In Grade 10, in Physics we investigate things such as the relationships between displacement and time and velocity and time for objects moving at constant velocity of constant acceleration.  In chemistry we investigate the relationship between concentration of solutions and their conductivity.
In Grade 11, the relationships between acceleration and mass and acceleration and net force are investigated.  Electromagnetic induction and the effect between speed of motion, strength of magnetic field and number of turns on a solenoid and the emf induced are investigated.  In all the grades various investigations regarding electricity are done.

UP with Science

The girls are encouraged to apply for the UP with Science programme in Grade 10.  It is a programme offered by the University of Pretoria, where the learners are exposed to a variety of different fields of science over a three year period (Grade 10 to Grade 12). We are allowed to apply for two girls, but usually only one is selected.   These learners have to attend one Saturday session per month and one week during the government school’s winter holidays.  Learners who participated in the programme and opt to study in any field of science (excluding medicine and engineering) at TUKS pay no tuition fees for their undergraduate studies.

Assessment and Projects

In the case of most of the practical investigations, girls have to write practical reports, based on the scientific method, that are assessed.
Short research assignments or translation tasks are also often assessed.
At least two standardised tests are written every term.  Two examinations, Chemistry and Physics, are written during each of the July and December examination sessions.

Career Paths and Opportunities

Although a pure B Sc degree with Physics and Chemistry can be studied (to be used for research etc), the true value of taking Physical Sciences at school is that it is needed for very many career-specific courses. It is compulsory for all engineering and for medicine.  It is needed for technical and vocational training, like electricians etc.

General

Although Physical Sciences is an important subject, not only in the sense that many fields of tertiary study require it, but also in terms of the thinking skills that they will develop, girls need to be aware of the fact that an aptitude for the subject is not enough.  They need to be aware of the fact that in order to develop whatever potential they have will require exceptionally hard work.

Performance: solo and group

Conclusion
The Subject Music Department at St Mary’s DSG aspires to instil confidence and commitment in what is undoubtedly a challenging but most rewarding course.
Education in music is most sovereign, because more than anything else rhythm and harmony find their way to the inmost soul and take strongest hold upon it, bringing with them and imparting grace (when) one is rightly trained - Plato

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Sepedi Sepedi

Mission Statement
With our ever-changing society, it is essential that we equip our young people in this country with the necessary skills to interact with as wide a population as possible. Since many learners who are native speakers of African languages attend English-medium education institutions, they lose their ability to converse and correspond in their home language. It is with this in mind that our mission statement is formulated. Sepedi enables the learners to communicate effectively, both in verbal and written disciplines, in their personal, social, educational and occupational environments.

Course Outline
To broaden and deepen language competencies so that learners are able to listen, speak, read/view and write/present with confidence that forms a basis for life-long learning.

Use language appropriately in real-life contexts.
Express and justify their own ideas, views and emotions confidently in order to become independent and analytical thinkers.
Use language and their imagination to represent and explore human experience.
Use language to access and manage information for learning across the curriculum.
Use language as a tool for critical and creative thinking.
Express reasoned opinions on ethical issues and values.
Interact critically with a wide range of texts.
Recognise the unequal status of different languages and language varieties.

Assessment and Examinations
There is continuous assessment of oral and written work in normal class situations.
Writing is assessed continuously across a range of different tasks such as language and comprehension exercises as well as creative, transactional and          functional writing.
Class tests and standardised tests are written regularly.
Homework and assignments are given regularly.
Projects are given termly.
Examinations

Paper I hours [100]
Paper II hours [100]
Continuous assessment: Portfolio [100]
Oral   [100]

Skills Taught
Basic language skills such as listening, speaking, reading and writing and research.
Language is the best tool for instilling life skills such as critical thinking, analysing, problem-solving, initiative, etc.

Special Event
Annually we organise the Sepedi Evening which is a special function where the culture and many of its practices are displayed, i.e. music, clothes, food and dances. This event is always blessed by excellent attendance by both the girls and their parents. Guests from outside are usually invited to come and share this event with us.

Career Paths and Opportunities
Teaching presents a definite career path.
Translating, interpreting, journalism and public relations present many career paths.
Lexicographers and terminologists, as this aspect is mostly needed by the Department of Arts and Culture as well as PANSALB.
The theatre, film, radio and television world are self-evident career opportunities.
Doctors working as interns all over the country, as well as nurses, would be well-equipped with the knowledge of an African language as part of their package.

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Information Technology (IT) Information Technology (IT)
What is Information Technology?

Information Technology is the study of the various interrelated physical and non-physical technologies used for the capturing of data, the processing of data into useful information and the management, presentation and dissemination of data. Information Technology studies the activities that deal with the solution of problems through logical and computational thinking. It includes the physical and non-physical components for the electronic transmission, access, and manipulation of data and information.

What is covered in IT?
The table below provides the six topics and sub-topics to be covered in Information Technology in Grades 10 – 12:

Topic Area Sub-Topics
Solution Development Algorithms and Problem-Solving
Introduction to Solution Development
Application Development
Software Engineering Principles
Communication Technologies Networks
E-communication
Systems Technologies Introduction to Computers
Hardware
Software
Computer Management
Internet Technologies Internet
World Wide Web
Internet Services
Data and Information Management Data Representation
Data Management
Database Design
Social Implications Legal issues
Ethical issues
Social issues
Environmental issues
Health issues
Computers and society

In Information Technology a learner will:
use appropriate techniques and procedures to plan solutions and devise algorithms to solve problems using suitable techniques and tools;
understand and use appropriate communication technologies for information dissemination;
appreciate and comprehend the various systems technologies used in the developing of a computer-based system;
 understand that all ICT systems are built upon software engineering principles;
understand and use Internet Technologies for various tasks;
comprehend and apply the concepts of data and information management to understand how a knowledge-driven society functions; and
understand the social implications of ICTs and how to use ICT technologies responsibly.

What does computer programming involve?
Most people use programmes on computers that have been developed by other people.  Every day people use Microsoft Word to create documents, or Excel to create spread sheets, or an e-mail programme to send and receive messages. These are very handy for everyday tasks. To gain an understanding of how these programmes were developed, and to develop logical problem-analysing and problem-solving skills, the skill of computer programming can be learned.

Computer programming (as taught at school) involves:
analysing problems into their smallest components,
designing a solution for each part of a problem and combining them into a complete solution,
coding that solution in a computer language,
testing that the solution works under most normal circumstances. 

These valuable skills (that are not available in any other school subject) teach logical thought processes that can be applied throughout one’s life. 
Computer programming is not an easily-learned skill.  It requires hours of practice, sitting at a computer, experimenting with different options to understand how they work.  It is challenging, but produces great rewards - the euphoria of getting a programme to work (after hours of toil) is a wonderful experience!
The hardest part of computer programming at school is learning one or more computer programming languages. There are many, many programming languages.  Each language requires that its particular syntax is learned and can be applied.  Once one programming language is well understood, it is easier to learn other programming languages, because many of the structures in the different languages are similar (conditional statements, loops, etc). 
Commonly used programming languages at South African schools these days are Java and Delphi.  Delphi is a good programming language to learn at school level as a first language for the following reasons:

It can be taught in a way that entrenches a sound understanding of basic programming syntax and structures, which empowers learners to be creative and inventive. This manner of teaching is better than simply learning programming skills.
It is free, and it is easily obtained by anyone with access to the Internet.
Delphi has built-in features that help learners quickly identify common programming mistakes.
Delphi provides learners with valuable employment skills.
 An Object Oriented Programming (OOP) approach is followed which enables students to pick up any other OOP Programming language.

Who should choose IT as a subject?
Learners with enthusiasm, enquiring minds, some logical thought processes, and the maturity to spend hours at a computer fine-tuning their programming skills should consider taking the subject.

The subject IT is not for the lazy learner!  There is an enormous amount of work to be covered, and to become proficient, many hours of hard work are required.  The rewards are directly in proportion to the effort expended!  For those wanting extension, there is infinite scope beyond school level, in terms of books, and information on the Internet.

Information Technology specifically forms the basis for studies in computer science, information systems, engineering and the business sciences.
Bio-informatics
Business Information Systems
Computer engineering
Computer science
Financial Information Systems
Geographical Information Systems
Informatics
Information systems
 Information Technology
System developer
Telecommunications engineer

IT involves the integration of theory and practice:
Computer or software architect
Data communication and network specialist
Hardware and software support technician
Technology manager
Programmer

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Life Orientation Life Orientation
Life Orientation as a Learning Area

Life Orientation is the study of the self in relation to others and to society on a personal, social, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, physical and developmental    level.
Life Orientation guides and prepares learners for life, its responsibilities and possibilities – it equips learners to solve problems and make informed decisions     and choices.
Life Orientation is an inter-disciplinary subject that draws on integrated knowledge, values and skills embedded in various career and study fields.
Physical Education is also included as part of Life Orientation. This is aimed at equipping students with the necessary skills to maintain a healthy lifestyle     through participation in physical activities and to allow them to adopt sport and physical recreation as a lifetime commitment.
The main objective is to provide a relevant and current forum in which pupils may explore life issues that affect them at their various stages of development    and obtain suitable guidance in dealing with any problems they may encounter.

Focus Areas covered
In Grades 10 and 11, the Life Orientation curriculum is divided into the following 6 topics:
Development of the self in society
Social and environmental responsibility
Democracy and Human Rights
Careers and career choices
Study skills
Physical Education

In Grade 12
Personal well-being:
Development of personal identity, self-development and building lasting relationships with self, family and peers
Various and diverse influences in society that impact on the well-being of self and others
Development of life skills to cope with stress, crisis situations and personal challenges that impact on lasting relationships with self, family and peers
Gender equity and the impact of gender specific challenges

Citizenship Education:
Active participation in the exploration of human rights issues in our immediate, national and international communities
Open discussion and investigation of current social issues i.e. discrimination, economic and social justice, sustainable living etc.
Diversity i.e. gender, religion, culture, ethnicity etc.
Democratic participation as guaranteed by the Constitution and Bill of Rights

Recreation and Physical Activity:
Nutrition and building a healthy and balanced life-style
Physical activity for sustainable physical health
Participation in organised and recreational sporting activities
Participation in environmental outdoor games
Issues concerning safety in physical exercise. This is implemented through activities such as lifesaving.

Careers and Career Choices:
Identifying and developing personal interests, knowledge , skills and abilities for future success
Current career and entrepreneurial options available and in demand 
Accessing information study and career options both nationally and internationally
Alternative tertiary options to university, gap-year opportunities and self-employment opportunities
 
Time management and goal setting, learning styles, study methods and study habits, stress management and examination-writing skills form an integral part of both the Personal Wellbeing and Career Focus areas throughout the High School Life Orientation programme.

Career and Study Fields linked to Life Orientation as a Learning Area
Sociology:  Social, Urban and Rural Studies / Social worker / Social Analyst etc.
Psychology:  All the principles of Psychology including Sport Psychology / Criminologist / Social Developer etc.
Political Sciences and International Studies:  Political Analyst / Diplomatic Studies / Journalism etc.
Labour Studies and Industrial Sociology:  Labour Relations / Arbitration and Conflict Management etc.
Human Movement Science and Sport Science: Sport and Recreation / Bio-mechanics / Bio Kinethetist / Sport Marketing/ and Financial Management etc.

Additionally, pupils are required to obtain four certificates during the three years of Grades 10 to12.  At least three learning outcomes need to be covered. Examples include:
Community Service: Grade 10 Débutante year
Citizenship: Leadership Camp
Personal Wellbeing: Fist Aid course
Recreation and Physical Activity: Course in sport umpiring and scoring

Career Guidance and Counselling
As a part of the Life Orientation curriculum, we offer specific and focused career and aptitude assessment and guidance to all our students.  This takes place in three formal phases:

Grade 11: Individual sessions are arranged during Term 2 and again in September to assist the students in establishing and achieving their academic goals for university application in their Grade 12 year.

Grade 12: Formal individual sessions are held with all the students during Term 1 and again at various times throughout the year as required by the students to provide career-specific guidance and assist them with current information and guidance for universities / college applications for their tertiary studies and options for the next year.  This includes application to international universities, colleges and/or structured gap year options.

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Life Sciences Life Sciences
Mission Statement
The study of Life for life

Introduction
Every human being, regardless of who they are, should have an understanding of their own structure and function, the structure and function of other organisms around them, and an understanding of the environment in which they live. This, in essence, is Life Science - the study of Life.

Preamble
Life Science is a living subject and there are so many aspects that lend themselves to hands-on practical work. This is an enjoyable and fascinating side of Life Sciences and it makes learning much more fun. It is easier for pupils to relate to theoretical concepts after practical work has been done. The practical component therefore forms an integral part of every section of Life Sciences.
It is our aim to be relevant and to get the pupils out into the biome and enjoy the subject as much as possible!

Curriculum Outline
There are four knowledge areas considered in Life Sciences in Grades 10 to 12:

Tissues, Cells and molecular study
1. The Chemistry of life.
2. Cell structure, cell division, cancer, tissues.
3. Micro-organisms: viruses, bacteria, protists and fungi.
4. Diseases and immunity.
5. Structure and significance of DNA and protein synthesis.
6. Discussion on issues relating to cloning, tissue sampling, DNA fingerprinting and applications to forensic science.
7. Meiosis.
8. Genetics, Inheritance and Genetic diseases.

Structures and control of processes in Life Systems
9.   Aerobic and anaerobic respiration, photosynthesis.
10. Human nutrition, breathing organs and gaseous exchange.
11. Structural support and transport, excretion, nervous system and endocrine system.
12. Asexual and sexual reproduction.
13. Human reproduction.
14. Issues relating to birth control and fertility.
15. Diseases related to all these systems.

Environmental Studies
16. Biosphere, biomes and ecosystems. Living and non-living resources.
17. Human influences on the environment.
18. Sustaining the environment.
19. Air-, land- and water-borne diseases.
20. Understanding and reporting on a local environment issue.
21. Effect of pollutants on human health.

Diversity, change and continuity.
22. Biodiversity of plants and animals and their conservation. Threats to biodiversity.
23. Adaptations for survival - symbiosis, mutualism, commensalism, parasitism, competition, and predator prey relationships.
24. Diseases related to parasitic relationships
25. Population studies.
26. Social behaviour and managing populations.
27. The history of life on earth.
28. Fossil studies.
29. Origin of species and theory of evolution.
30. Popular theories of mass extinction of organisms.
31. Cradle of mankind.

Skills taught in Life Sciences
The skills taught and developed are transferable and required in all walks of life.
There is an emphasis on both group and individual work in the following areas:

Observation skills
Measuring skills
Recording skills
Numeracy skills
Skills relating to the development of logic
Manipulation and handling of apparatus
Procedural skills
Interference skills
Investigation skills
Evaluation skills
Discussion of moral and ethical issues 

Enrichment and Special Events
The course material is continually revised and we aim to make the material interesting and relevant to our students. We value excellence and aim to extend     pupils so that they can reach their own potential. There is use of laptop and Internet related notes and assignments on a variety of topics. Pupils are able to     research and discover information at an advanced level. They are able to access new information and read about cutting-edge discoveries. 
The application of what they have learnt in Life Science is also discussed with many other related topics such as cloning, biotechnology and disease conditions.     These topics extend pupil interest and knowledge and make them more aware of developments taking place in the world around them.
We aim to discuss difficult issues with respect to the framework of the Christian ethos upheld by our school.
Visits and outings are organised to places of interest depending on topics that are being studied. Some of the activities we have organised have been trips to     Pretoria University to see the scanning and transmission electron microscopes, ecological fieldtrips to Rietvlei Nature Reserve, visits to Maropeng, the        Sterkfontein Caves and the WITS Origins Centre and tours of Rietvlei Water Treatment Plant, ERWAT, SAKATA Seed Southern Africa, and FABI.
Guest speakers are also invited to assist the learners in making choices about careers in the various scientific fields and to hear about actual research that is     taking place.

Laboratory Facilities
All lessons are held in multi-purpose laboratories designed to be very user-friendly. The laboratories are fully equipped. Intervention and help is offered when     needed. There is a full-time laboratory technician who helps with the preparation and setting up of practical tasks.
All laboratories have data projectors and interactive Smartboards to enrich learning. Pupils are given opportunities to give presentations to the class on topics     relevant to the syllabus. The Life Science Department has bought interactive software packages that staff and pupils use during lessons. Some interactive     software is loaded onto individual laptops so all pupils are able to revise at home using this software.

General
The study of Life Sciences is either required or strongly recommended for the study of the following careers. It must be stressed that most of the following careers require Mathematics and Physical Science.

Medical Science
   Doctor, Dentist, Geneticist, Medical Technologist, Pathologist, Pharmacist, Nurse, Physiotherapist, Dietician, Occupational and Speech Therapist.
Environmental
   Ecologist, Horticulturist, Game-Ranger, Wildlife Management, Forestry.
Veterinarian Science
   Veterinarian, Veterinary nurse.
Food Technology
   Dietician, Researcher, Brewer.                                                                 
Education
   Teaching, lecturing, research.
Biotechnology.

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Mathematical Literacy Mathematical Literacy

Mathematical Literacy is the alternative to Core Mathematics offered in Grades 10, 11 and 12.  The National Curriculum Statement for Mathematical Literacy states that the purpose of the subject is to provide learners with an awareness and understanding of the role that Mathematics has in the modern world.

Mathematical Literacy focuses on the areas in real life where Mathematics is needed i.e. on problems and situations related to daily life contexts in which Mathematics is embedded. Students learn practical skills that will enable them to find concrete solutions to numeric, spatial and statistical problems associated with the everyday challenges of life.

It is inappropriate to compare Mathematical Literacy with the old Standard Grade Mathematics, as it is an entirely different subject with its own distinctive curriculum and purpose. The curriculum has been designed to develop skills necessary for learners to gain confidence, become self-managing persons and improve their chances of success in dealing with financial and other quantitative demands of the modern world. Teachers will aim to foster an approach of curiosity and exploration in order to encourage learners to enjoy, appreciate and value the subject.  Learners are encouraged to explore their own ways of thinking in order to develop individual methods and strategies for practical problem-solving situations.

The content of Mathematical Literacy is designed to enable learners to handle, with confidence, the Mathematics that affects their lives. However, Mathematical Literacy should not be taken by those learners who intend studying disciplines at a tertiary level that are mathematically-based, such as the Natural Sciences or Engineering.

Mathematical Literacy is suitable for:
Learners who wish to proceed to disciplines within the Social and Life Sciences sector, as Mathematical Literacy will enable them to deal effectively with mathematically-related requirements in these areas.
Equipping mathematically less able learners with the skills and knowledge needed to be able to interact confidently with the Mathematics encountered in everyday situations.

It is sometimes perceived to be inferior to study Mathematical Literacy over Mathematics, but this perception arises out of a misunderstanding of what is acceptable and what is interpreted as ‘clever’.  Not all girls have been granted the same talents, and it is imperative to focus on the subject that embraces each individual’s strengths, as their career post-school (and university) will be chosen based on these strengths.  It does not help to insist on the choice of Core Mathematics – especially when students’ confidence is low, their results consistently below 50% and their passion not within the bounds of the subject.  For further information with regards to career opportunities with Mathematical Literacy, feel free to visit:

http://www.careerplanet.co.za/faq/what-can-i-do-with-maths-literacy

Curriculum Outline:  Mathematical Literacy

Basic skills topics Weighting in exam
Interpreting and communicating answers and calculations These topics will be assessed in an integrated
way in the application topics
Numbers and calculations with numbers
Patterns, relationships and interpretations
Application topics
Finance 35%
Measurement 20%
Maps , plans and other representations of the physical world 15%
Data handling 25%
Probability 5%

Assessment and Examination:  Assessment is structured exactly as with Mathematics.

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English English
Mission Statement

English is both the foundation and the cornerstone of effective communication. It is within this framework that every facet of communication is made possible both academically and socially.

At St Mary’s DSG, it is our aim to equip our girls with the necessary skills to communicate in a number of interesting and relevant fields. We also strive to instil a love and enjoyment of the English language. The girls are taught a critical awareness of various texts, how language is manipulated to alter style and meaning, and they are exposed to a wide variety of multi-media. Furthermore, with excellent English skills, pupils may compete with confidence for world-wide career opportunities.

Curriculum Outline
Listening and speaking
The learner is able to listen and speak for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

Reading and viewing
The learner is able to read and view for understanding and to evaluate critically and respond to a wide range of texts.

Writing and presenting
The learner is able to write and present for a wide range of purposes and audiences using conventions and formats appropriate to diverse contexts.

Language structures and conventions
The learner is able to use language structures and conventions appropriately and effectively.
These skills are taught in an integrated manner with emphasis on the application of the skills and the development of insight and higher order cognitive processes.

Language includes:
comprehension and language techniques. There is an emphasis on recognition of appropriate tone, style and register in different types of writing in order to teach better communication skills. Language in the visual and written media is also emphasised.

Literature includes:
plays, novels and poetry, both international and South African.  A holistic approach is used in the teaching of the various genres linking the relevant themes to the experiences of the learner.  The use of drama and multi-media is of huge benefit in this regard.  It is our wish that a love and appreciation of the linguistic and artistic beauty of literature will be instilled in learners as well as to develop a passion for reading that will enrich the girls’ lives far beyond their school years.

Original writing incorporates various types of transactional writing as well as essay and poetry writing. The learners are encouraged to express themselves creatively whilst developing an individual style and “voice”.

Oral work includes:
dramatic presentations, media presentations, prepared and unprepared speeches, reading, debating, conversational skills and listening comprehensions. We aim to develop the girls’ confidence and communicative abilities.

Visual literacy encompasses the study of a variety of films and visual media to enable learners to view with discrimination and to understand film technology and techniques. A critical approach to the viewing of films is a life skill. The girls are also exposed to various other forms of audio-visual material such as radio and television, advertising as well as propaganda techniques.

Homework, Assignments and Projects
Homework is set on a regular basis in order to supplement and extend classroom work. Each girl has a home reader in addition to the literature being studied in class.  Projects are set within the different grades and will reflect different aspects of language use, media and literature study.  It is intended that research and presentation skills be acquired and that learners realise the joy and satisfaction of discovering information for themselves. The girls are given tasks and tests in order to learn, improve and reinforce their skills.

Career Paths and Opportunities
English is an important component of the entrance requirements for tertiary education.  The most obvious career paths for students of English are those careers where effective communication is vital:

Journalism
Drama
Teaching
Advertising
Public Relations
Television and Radio

Special Events
The school runs many extra-curricular activities that help reinforce and develop the English skills learned in the classroom. During the course of the year, a number of exciting events take place in the English Department:

English Olympiad course and examination run by The Grahamstown Foundation and SACEE
Pretoria Public Speaking Contest  
Old Girls’ Essay Competition    
Writers’ workshops
The Inter-House Public Speaking Contest
Debating
Poetry Week and the Rowena Navickas Poetry Competition
Participation in the Highveld English Festival
Interpretive Reading evenings

In addition to these activities, there are opportunities to visit the theatre as well as visits to the school by theatre groups who perform plays and poetry collages on subjects relevant to the syllabus.

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French French
Why would it be relevant to take French as a subject?

More than 500 million people all over the world speak French.  French is the second most spoken language in Africa, where no less than 33 countries are francophone. It is also a universal business language. Therefore, French is an important language for any young South African to learn. Former President Mbeki and his government stressed the importance of French in the economic context of Africa. Consequently, South Africa has started opening its boarders and the country is welcoming more and more West African immigrants every year. Our country forms part of the bigger context of Africa and cannot develop outside this context, including the reality of francophone countries.  Hence the answer as to why we should learn French in Africa begins to reveal itself.

Furthermore, there has been a considerable effort to promote the language in South Africa. In 2013, Francois Hollande, (the current president of France) and his ministers met with our government with the aim of establishing South Africa as a base for large future investment projects in Africa. Therefore any young South African having mastered basic communication skills in French has a considerable advantage when applying for a job in the South African market. Many well-known international and South African consulting firms advise their employees to take lessons in foreign languages such as Portuguese or French, as they understand the relevance of being able to communicate in another language and penetrate / understand other cultures.

In South Africa, French is a compulsory subject for students wishing to pursue a career in International Relations and Diplomatic Studies. It is also useful for pupils considering careers in Law, Engineering, Construction, Medicine (“Médecins sans frontières” / “Doctors without borders” is essentially a French organization), the Hospitality industry, Fashion and Design, Tourism and Commerce. In fact, French would be a welcome addition for any young employee applying for a job with a firm who has business projects in African francophone countries. 

Students who are passionate about languages might wish to pursue a career in interpretation, translation or teaching/ lecturing in FLE (French Foreign Language).

At all South African universities, there are currently postgraduate bursaries available for students to pursue further studies in France. These are sponsored by the cultural section of the French embassy.

French can also be pursued at university as a choice subject, apart from specific course subjects your daughter will have to take, according to the field she will be studying in.

University Application in Europe
Taking French as a second subject for a Law, Medical, Engineering, International Politics or Electronics degree may be of practical use to students. They could be awarded scholarships on the basis that they have a foreign language as part of their package.

Finally, there is a pleasure in discovering other cultures and in being able to communicate in a foreign language. Mastering a foreign language is a gift, similar to playing an instrument… a gift one continues to develop and enjoy for the rest of one’s life.

Who should take French as a subject?
Apart from the reasons mentioned above, it is strongly recommended that your daughter only considers taking the subject if she has a talent for and enjoys language learning.

She should also have a strong command of her First Language.

The level expected by Grade 12 requires students to have an ability to interpret, and show real insight into texts, both literary and unseen texts, such as articles taken from magazines.

They should demonstrate the ability to communicate their ideas clearly, even if only at a basic level (Third Language).  A learner who therefore struggles with her First and Second Additional Languages, or who does not really have the ability to interpret content and formulate ideas clearly, will become discouraged along the way.

Furthermore, learners who choose to pursue the subject, need to understand that language learning is a continuous skill:  in order to really make progress in and enjoy the subject, extra effort, such as reading French magazines, (which are readily available in class),  making use of online websites, watching French movies or listening to songs, is required.

Those who are really passionate about the subject have excelled, time and time again!

General course outline and outcomes
The French course comprises an oral, aural and written component, with emphasis on mastering basic grammatical structures and concepts. 

A communicative approach is used, supported by various textbooks (often accompanied by CDs) and online websites, in order to prepare the learners not only for the oral and written examination, but also for their continued interaction with French-speaking individuals.

By following a foreign language course, the learners become aware of the process of language acquisition, its use and misuse. 
 
In Grade 10, students are taught how to talk about basic everyday themes such as introducing themselves and their family, daily routine, school, hobbies, holidays, future plans etc. They are also taught practical skills such as making reservations in a hotel, ordering food in a restaurant, inviting someone somewhere, interpreting visual stimuli, (adverts) etc.
 
In Grades 11 and 12, various other relevant themes are explored: the youth, health, sport, food, media, technology, travelling, friendship, teenage problems and the environment, are some of the themes which are dealt with. These themes are explored via articles created for foreign language learning, listening exercises and comprehension texts.

The aim is mainly for students to be able to understand authentic French and have a basic conversation by the time they reach Grade 12. As French is a Third Language for many students, this poses something of a challenge for many candidates, but students who are truly passionate about the subject and who work consistently, do reach a confident level of communication.

In Grade 12, the curriculum leads to the inclusion of the study of literary texts, both prose and poetry, at matriculation level.

Homework and Home Study
The study of a language is an ongoing process, not different to mastering playing a musical instrument.  Learners will be expected to revise and familiarise themselves with concepts after every lesson. Learners should also make use of the online site the school registers for annually, called Linguascope, and are encouraged to make use of online material, such as Languages-online, DVDs and CDs used in class, as a further aid in their process of revision.

Oral Component
Oral comprehension is one of the most important skills to be acquired. This is regularly evaluated with the aid of texts from relevant French foreign language study guides. Every learner does an oral examination as part of their assessment.
 
Assessment and Examinations
The assessment that occurs in French is outcomes-based. This implies that the process of a specific task as well as the continued monitoring of progress occurs.

For the final examination, the Grade 12 candidate is expected to submit a portfolio detailing the creative writing undertaken during the year, including work based on literature. The learners sit a grammar examination, as well as an oral moderation.
 
Enrichment
DELF (DIPLOME ELEMENTAIRE DE LA LANGUE FRANCAISE)

Furthermore, at St Mary’s DSG, Grade 11 students who have an average of more than 70% are encouraged to sit levels A2 and B1 of the DELF (Elementary Diploma Of French as a Foreign Language), written under the auspices of the Alliance Française. This is an international certification examination, certifying that students have the ability to communicate on a specific level in French. It is very useful for university application and a plus on one’s CV. The DELF examination is also internationally recognised and further qualifications can be obtained throughout the world on presentation of certification. The French department also offers training for the DELF examinations and pays internally for students wishing to sit the examination.

Independently organised tour to France
All learners in the department are encouraged to join a tour to France, which is arranged independently. This tour offers learners the opportunity to attend an international French language course at a school, based in the South of France. The course is based on the DELF system and each student attends classes according to her level of communication.  Students also make new friends, visit various towns on the Cote d’Azur and do a tour of Paris. The value of this tour should not be underestimated, as learners encounter a world which functions in French!  It further encourages them, opens their minds to French culture and enables them to communicate more confidently.

Conclusion
Therefore, taking the subject will offer your daughter unique opportunities, both in South Africa and internationally, if she is passionate about foreign language learning and prepared to make the most of it.

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Geography Geography

Geography is the meeting point of many disciplines, since all of the Earth’s systems, whether natural or human, interact across its surface. Geography provides a unique link between the natural sciences and humanities, creating the overview necessary for the full understanding and effective management of our planet, its people and its resources. Geography caters for a wide variety of abilities and interests, and is today an Environmental Science. It is an extremely topical, challenging and enriching subject which brings together many relevant areas of study in one discipline, e.g. economics, meteorology, ecology etc. In addition, the important ability of decision-making is nurtured.

With the introduction of the NSC, Geography has become more linked to ICT and in particular the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). South Africa is one of the first countries in the world to integrate Geographic Information Systems into the national curriculum. Our goal is to create a truly global awareness of the world around us and to understand and offer solutions to the issues that humankind faces.

Geography is:

Understanding

the natural world;
the interactions of people with each other and with their environment;
the opportunities and constraints facing different communities around the world.

Learning

to manage the world, its people and its resources;
skills for life - to enable learners to participate in building tomorrow’s world and the creation of a sustainable future.

Geography in the NSC is based on:

the study of themes and issues related to the natural, human and economic systems of the world, the processes that shape them, their inter-relationships and evolution over time;
the responsible and sustainable management of these systems;
the development of a sound awareness of our environment and a sense of place at all scales, from the local to the global;
the development of key skills, such as the ability to collect, analyse and present information; planning and teamwork and responsible decision-making which considers environmental, economic and socio-political factors.

What do we study?
Students follow courses based largely on the investigation of the physical and human environments. We focus on comparisons between the African continent and other places around the world, with an introduction to different forms of enquiry, field-work, research and problem-solving using the principals of GIS.

GRADE 10
1.  Geographical skills and techniques: topographic maps, GIS
2.  The composition and structure of the atmosphere
3.  Plate tectonics, folding, faulting, volcanoes and earthquakes
4.  Population: structure, growth, and movement
5.  Water resources: water in the world: oceans, flooding, water management

GRADE 11
1.  Geographical skills and techniques: topographic maps, aerial photos, orthophoto maps, GIS
2.  Global air circulation, Africa’s weather and climate
3.  Rocks and landforms, slopes, mass movements
4.  Development: differences, issues, and opportunities
5.  Resources and sustainability: soil, energy

GRADE 12
1.  Geographical skills and techniques: topographic maps, GIS, synoptic weather maps
2.  Climate and weather: cyclones, local climate
3.  Geomorphology: drainage systems and fluvial processes
4.  Rural and urban settlement
5.  Economic geography of South Africa

Geography and Careers
The  study  of  Geography provides  an  essential  base  for  a  wide  range  of careers, including business management, administration and government, manufacturing, marketing, planning, tourism, environmental, resource or estate management, forestry or farming, engineering, education and many others.

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History History

“Historians do not perform heart transplants, improve highway design, or arrest criminals. In a society that quite correctly expects education to serve useful purposes, the functions of History can seem more difficult to define than those of engineering or medicine. History is in fact very useful, actually indispensable, but the products of historical study are less tangible, sometimes less immediate, than those that stem from some other disciplines.” Peter N. Stearns

Mission Statement
The Department of History of St Mary’s DSG aims to expose learners to world history through a mixed and varied syllabus and in so doing, to raise awareness of recurring patterns and themes within the sweep of history. We hope to achieve this through promoting habits of analysis, debating and critical thinking amongst the learners. We do this in order to bring the learners to a point where they can see the past as a building block for the future, appreciate current affairs and their causes, and prepare themselves for an active role in the world after school.

Why study History?
A study of History builds the capacity of people to make informed choices in order to contribute constructively to society and to advance democracy. History, as a vehicle of personal empowerment, engenders in learners an understanding of human agency, which brings with it the knowledge that, as human beings, they have choices, and that they can make the choice to change the world for the better.
 
A rigorous process of historical enquiry:
encourages and assists constructive debate through careful evaluation of a broad range of evidence and diverse points of view;
provides a critical understanding of socio-economic systems in their historical perspective and their impact on people;
supports the view that historical truth consists of a multiplicity of voices expressing varying and often contradictory versions of the same history;
History is an excellent preparation for the world of work. Society values people who are:
open-minded
good at problem-solving
able to pick out the essential from the trivial
independent thinkers.
 
Career Paths and Opportunities
The History Department believes that History offers a preparation for careers in the legal profession, political science, social sciences,  journalism, teaching and lecturing — and in fact, in any career where an appreciation of the past, and empathy with world problems and an ability to think clearly and concisely, would be valued. It is our greatest wish that learners of all ages enjoy their studies in the department.

Curriculum Outlines
Grade 10
The world around 1600
Expansion and conquest during the 15th – 18th centuries
Transformation of Southern Africa after 1750
Colonial expansion after 1750
South African War and Union

Grade 11
Communism in Russia 1900 – 1940
Capitalism and the USA 1900 – 1940
Ideas of race in the late 19th and 20th centuries
Nationalism: South Africa, Middle East and Africa
Apartheid in SA 1940s – 1960s
 
Grade 12
The Cold War
Independent Africa
Civil society protests 1950s – 1990s
Civil resistance 1970s – 1980s in SA
Coming of democracy in SA
End of the Cold War and new global order
 
Homework, Assignments and Projects
Homework is set so that you may:
Study for a test
Research a given topic
Present a project: written, spoken or enacted.
 
Assignments offer you the opportunity to:
Apply basic knowledge
Explore topics of interest
Extend your skills of application or presentation
 
Projects (Group or Individual)
Provide an in-depth study of a specific area of the syllabus, linked to Outcomes Based Education requirements.
 
Assessment and Examinations
 
Grade 10 – 12
Paper 1:
Section A: Single Source Analysis (3 x 20) 60 marks

Three questions will be set across at least two of the set themes. Each question will focus on an analysis of a single source. The format of these three questions will take the following form:

- one will be a visual analysis
- one will require a textual analysis
- one will link a theme to a current issue in the media. This will require the candidates to make links between events and issues from the past with   the present.

The questions will require broad historical understanding, but will also focus on specific historical skills, such as analysis, evaluation of written and visual sources, and engaging with issues of reliability and usefulness.

Candidates will be required to do all three questions.

Section B: Source-Based Questions 90 marks
There will be one set of questions based on a range of different sources from one or more of the three prescribed themes.

Section C: Source-Based Essay 50 marks
The source-based essay will develop from the source-based questions in Section B.

Paper 2: EXTENDED WRITING PAPER  
Section A: Discursive Essay 70 marks

Three questions will be set, one on each of the three prescribed themes. Candidates will be required to answer one question. The discursive essay should be approximately 800-900 words in length.

A discursive essay question targets higher order cognitive skills and learners will respond according to their abilities.

Section B: Extended Writing 30 marks
Three questions will be set, one on each of the three prescribed themes.
Candidates will be required to answer any one question. The extended writing should be approximately 350-400 words in length.
 
Excursions / Items of Interest
Historical Movies
We use historical movies in class as enhancement to the understanding of themes, for example: The Mission, Mississippi Burning, Rabbit Proof Fences, Platoon, Red Dust

We host annual History Evenings. These are evenings where the students showcase their best work to parents and invited guests.
 
We participate in the Pretoria Inter-Cluster History Speech Competition as well as the Young Historian Competition. 
 
Our Patron is Dr Alan Kirkaldy from Rhodes University. He guides us to keep our work relevant and focused on what lies ahead for our girls planning on furthering their studies.
 
Grade 10 students make a music video using protest songs or other relevant music with historical importance.

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Consumer Studies Consumer Studies
Introduction

The subject Consumer Studies focuses on developing knowledge, skills, values and attitudes in learners, to enable them to become responsible and informed consumers of food, clothing, housing, furnishings and household equipment and to use resources optimally and in a sustainable manner.  The subject also promotes the application of knowledge and skills in entrepreneurship and the production of quality marketable products that will meet consumer needs. 

Syllabus
The topics that are covered are: 

Entrepreneurship – production and marketing
Food and Nutrition
Clothing and Fashion
Housing and Interiors
Food Production/Practical – the learners will, where possible, cook at least once a cycle.

The Consumer

Investigate channels for consumer complaints.
Analyse the implication of taxes, interest rates and inflation on the management of available funds for acquiring food, clothing, housing and furnishings.

Food and Nutrition

Suggest guidelines for the prevention of nutritional and food-related health conditions.
Identify consumer issues related to the impact of the selection and use of food on the natural and economic environment and suggest strategies for addressing these issues.

Clothing

Examine and describe current fashion trends for young adults.
Apply clothing theory to the selection of clothing for young adults.
Identify consumer issues related to the impact of the selection and use of clothing on the natural or economic environment and suggest strategies for addressing these issues.

Housing and Interiors

Explain the financial and contractual responsibilities of the occupants for different housing options and identify the role players involved.
Compare and evaluate the choice of large household equipment, and explain the financial, contractual and environmental responsibilities when purchasing     such equipment.
Discuss the responsible use of municipal services and the importance of waste control related to housing and household equipment.

Entrepreneurship and Production – Theory

Formulate a plan to produce and market a quality product  - identify business opportunities, develop specifications for a product, control the quality of the product, develop a marketing plan, complete a financial feasibility study, determine production costs, selling price, profit and start-up needs and create a cash-flow projection.

Entrepreneurship and Production – Practical Assessment Task

Food Production – the learner will formulate a plan for the production of a product, as well as apply theory and demonstrate practical skills to produce quality,              marketable products while working individually.

Why Choose Consumer Studies?
So…… you have read a little about the aims and mission of our department, understood the contents of the syllabus and know more about the weighting of the theory and practical components of the subject.
 
If you have the qualities we are looking for and have always been interested in cooking, nutrition, fashion design, textiles, interior design and housing, marketing and consumer needs, then you are the person who should be studying Consumer Studies. It is easy to identify those pupils who have chosen it because they really want to, and those who have thought it to be an easy option!

Consumer Studies is a life skill - you will definitely use the skills you learn every day of your life.  So remember...you don’t have to study Consumer Studies solely to enter the relevant job opportunity fields (of which there are many) but you can choose it because it will help you in your everyday life and, most of all, it is fun!

Girls who are set on very different career paths could take Consumer Studies at St Mary's DSG - from the prospective doctor or lawyer to fashion designer!

What qualities do I need?

Even though Consumer Studies is fun – remember it is also hard work!
Consumer Studies students are those people who have a passion for food, clothing, housing, soft furnishings and interiors and have high standards, values and goals in life.

Tertiary Education
University of Pretoria
University of the Free State – B Consumer Science Degree
University of Potchefstroom
University of Stellenbosch
University of South Africa (Unisa)
Tshwane University of Technology – and the Universities of Technology in other provinces.

Career Opportunities
(Acknowledgement to the University of the Free State).

The Entrepreneur:
The consumer scientist has the knowledge and skills to undertake an own business and become the employer instead of the employee. A product or service which consumers need can be marketed.

The Consultant:
The consumer scientist is well-equipped to be a consumer consultant.  She can advise the consumer on making a responsible selection considering both the need and the available resources.  Manufacturers and large stores often use consumer consultants to advise their customers and give customer care service.

The Product Developer and Manufacturer:
Knowledge and skills are used to develop new products to satisfy the consumer’s need. 

The Buyer:
This career involves buying for stores that supply foods, clothing or household items.  One could fly all over the world to attend fashion and commercial shows, to decide what will end up on our local store shelves.

The Marketer:
Knowledge and understanding of products and services, and skills used to design and manufacture products are used to promote and market these products and services.

The Quality Control Inspector:
The consumer scientist is well-equipped with the knowledge of the properties of a product as well as the methods to test these properties to become a quality control inspector. Manufacturers need quality control inspectors to keep quality at a set standard.  Large stores and laboratories also employ quality control inspectors to support their buyers and consumer consultants.

The Lecturer or Teacher:
There are opportunities to become an educator in one of several subjects at universities, colleges and schools.

Other career opportunities:

Consumer Services and Event Management.
Co-ordinate events within the fields of food or design.
Marketing consumer products within a company.
Public Relations and Media.
Promoting products to consumers and dealing with advertising.
Product Development and Quality Assurance.
Developing new consumer products suited to their needs – this could be clothing, food or furnishings.
Promotion or Liaison Officer - Introduce new / existing products of a wide variety to consumers. Demonstrate, develop, test and market products.
Journalism - Writing talent and creativity applied in the press, radio, TV media on a full-time, part-time or freelance basis.
Research - In the food, nutrition, clothing and housing fields in the manufacturing industry and at research institutions.
Dietician - Register for private practice or in the service of hospitals / private companies.
Clothing - Clothing designer, dressmaker, merchandiser, fashion buyer.
Housing - Interior designer, housing consultant.
Hotel / Restaurant / Catering - Hospitality industry: manage game lodges, offer private catering. Food Services Management.
Adult education - Develop programmes, do extension work in government services or NGOs in community development.

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Dramatic Art Dramatic Art
 “True education flowers at the point when delight falls in love with responsibility.”

Dramatic Arts as described in the curriculum is:

The study of the representation of human experience in dramatic form for an audience. This study integrates practical experiences and competencies with the study of texts in context and theatre practices. Learners explore how dramatic and theatrical elements are selected and combined for particular purposes within diverse contexts, with a focus on the role of the dramatic arts in South Africa.

Learners acquire specific capabilities of expressing and communicating through the dramatic arts including skills in improvisation, vocal and physical communication and expressiveness, the creation and presentation of performances, the analysis and interpretation of texts in context, and the study of dramatic practices, processes and products.

Dramatic Arts prepares learners for entry into further studies for a possible career in the drama (or related arts) field, while equipping learners with crucial life skills such as self-confidence, creativity, communication skills, self-discipline, critical and creative thinking, leadership and teamwork which will benefit the individual in any field or future interest.

The specific aims for Grade 10 - 12:

To develop the human instrument (body/voice/mind/emotions) as an instrument of expression, communication and creativity.
Develop drama skills, techniques and processes to experiment with and shape dramatic elements meaningfully both individually and with others.
Create and present dramatic products across a range of modes (lyrical, narrative, and dramatic) and styles (realistic, heightened).
To understand and analyse principles and elements of drama in texts and performances in context, in South Africa and the world.
To reflect on and evaluate their own and others’ dramatic processes, practices and products.
To develop insight into how the dramatic arts affirm, challenge and celebrate values, cultures and identities.
Engage with contemporary issues through the dramatic arts.
To promote social, cultural and personal development.
To encourage students to have a questioning spirit and be anti-discriminatory in their worldview.
To expose students to a wide range of accessible, relevant and challenging learning contexts and activities.

Overview of Broad Topics

Broad Topic 1 Personal Resources These are essentially practical in nature
Broad Topic 2 Acting and performance
Broad Topic 3 Performance text in context These are essentially theoretical in nature, although they can be experienced and understood through practical learning experiences.
Broad Topic 4 Theatre production

Academic Objectives for Dramatic Arts

to build self-esteem, confidence and resilience
to encourage a positive work ethic among the pupils
to instill a love for the Performing Arts
to improve the communication skills of the pupils
to foster moral and social awareness and develop creativity in the pupils
to develop critical thinking and the skills by which pupils are able to assess their environment and form independent views and attitudes towards social, environmental and political issues and to teach life skills wherever possible
to prepare pupils for the academic challenges of tertiary education
to achieve a 100% pass rate at the end of the year if feasible


Career Paths and Opportunities
Drama is an inclusive and holistic art form. In performance it involves all aspects of the human being, including the voice, body, intellect, emotions, creativity and spirit, as well as our social skills of interaction, communication, active listening and empathy. It also draws on the other art forms, using music and sound, movement and dance, visual arts and design.

When studying drama, learners learn about aspects of life which form part of many other disciplines, including:

Sociology
Fashion
Psychology
Language and Literature
History
Popular Culture
Politics
Philosophy
Economics
Religion
Architecture • Ethics
Law Multimedia

No wonder drama is so much fun to do, to watch and to be part of!

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Advanced Programme Mathematics Advanced Programme Mathematics

The advanced level of Mathematics (Advanced Programme Mathematics) is designed for students who have a real passion for the subject.  It is a three-year course, designed for students who enjoy and achieve excellent results in Mathematics and would like more challenges in the subject.
A learner must have displayed an ability to apply mathematical concepts in unknown situations. A good understanding of mathematical concepts is required as well as the ability to make logical deductions. No girl should consider participating in Advanced Programme Mathematics unless she has a positive attitude; a positive mathematical self-image; determination to succeed; perseverance and self-discipline and the willingness to take responsibility for her own achievements.  A work ethic of a very high standard is clearly essential.  As Advanced Programme Mathematics is an extra subject, it demands more work and more time.
At the end of Grade 9, girls will be invited into the Advanced Mathematics Programme.  If a girl is unable to maintain a Mathematics average above 70%, she will be requested to return to Core Mathematics only.  This can happen at the end of Grade 10 and again at the end of Grade 11. 

Compulsory Component:
Algebra, Calculus, Radian Measure

Elective:
St Mary’s DSG’s chosen elective is Matrices and Graph Theory.  The other options for the elective are Finance and Modelling or Statistics and Probability, but these are not taught at St Mary’s DSG.

Assessment and Examination:
Assessments in Advanced Programme Mathematics are rare.  Students are normally only tested under examination conditions.  This is purely because of time constraints – testing is time consuming, and the teachers have very little time to teach the content of this subject.

Contact Time:

Grade 10:
One hour session once a week.

Grade 11:
One evening session (1 ½ hours) and one hour session each week.

Grade 12:
One evening session (1 ½ hours) and one hour session each week, plus 3 hour Saturday workshops in Term 1 and Term 2 on elected Saturdays (reflected in the school calendar)

(Information taken from the National Curriculum Statement Grades 10–12 (General) Advanced Programme Mathematics (previously known as Additional Mathematics)

DEFINITION
Advanced Programme Mathematics is an extension of Mathematics and is similarly based on the following view of the nature of the discipline. Advanced Programme Mathematics enhances mathematical creativity and logical reasoning about problems in the physical and social world and in the context of Mathematics itself. All mathematics is a distinctly human activity developed over time as a well-defined system with a growing number of applications in our world. Knowledge in the mathematical sciences is constructed through the establishment of descriptive, numerical and symbolic relationships. Advanced Programme Mathematics also observes patterns and relationships, leading to additional conjectures and hypotheses and developing further theories of abstract relations through rigorous logical thinking. Mathematical problem solving in Advanced Programme Mathematics enables us to understand the world in greater depth and make use of that understanding more extensively in our daily lives. The Mathematics presented in Advanced Programme Mathematics has been developed and contested over time through both language and symbols by social interaction, and continues to develop, thus being open to change and growth.

Learning Outcome 1:  Calculus
The learner is able to establish, define, manipulate, determine and represent the derivative and integral, both as an anti-derivative and as the area under the curve, of various algebraic and trigonometric functions and solve related problems with confidence.

Learning Outcome 2: Algebra
The learner is able to represent investigate, analyse, manipulate and prove conjectures about numerical and algebraic relationships and functions, and solve related problems.

Learning Outcome 3: Statistics
The learner is able to organise, summarise, analyse and interpret data to identify, formulate and test statistical and probability models, and solve related problems.

Learning Outcome 4: Mathematical Modelling
The learner is able to investigate, represent and model growth and decay problems using formulae difference equations and series.

Learning Outcome 5: Matrices and Graph Theory
The learner is able to identify, represent and manipulate discrete variables using graphs and matrices, applying algorithms in modelling finite systems.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  Compulsory

 

Grade 10

 

 

Calculus Algebra Statistics Matrices & applications Mathematical Modelling

 

  Compulsory Options (pick one topic)

 

Grade 11 & Grade 12

 

 

Calculus Algebra Statistics

 

 

Matrices & applications Mathematical Modelling

 

PURPOSE
In a society that values diversity and equality, and a nation that has a globally competitive economy, it is imperative that within the Further Education and Training band learners who perform well in Mathematics or who have a significant enthusiasm for mathematics are offered an opportunity to increase their knowledge, skills, values and attitudes associated with Mathematics, and so put them in a position to contribute more significantly as citizens of South Africa. The study of Advanced Programme Mathematics contributes to the personal development of high performing Mathematics learners by providing challenging learning experiences; feelings of success and self-worth; and the development of appropriate values and attitudes through the successful application of its knowledge and skills in context, and through the collective engagement with mathematical ideas.

SCOPE
Advanced Programme Mathematics is aimed at increasing the number of learners who through competence and desire enter tertiary education to pursue careers in Mathematics, engineering, technology and the sciences. Advanced Programme Mathematics is an extension and challenge for learners who demonstrate a greater than average ability in, or enthusiasm for Mathematics. The greater breadth of mathematical knowledge gained and the deepening of mathematical process skills developed through being exposed to Advanced Programme Mathematics enhances the learner’s understanding of Mathematics both as a discipline and as a tool in society. This broadens the learner’s perspective on possible careers in Mathematics and develops a passion for and a commitment to the continued learning of Mathematics amongst mathematically-talented learners. This assists in meeting their needs and encourages more mathematically-talented learners to pursue careers and interests in mathematically related fields.

The studying  of Advanced Programme Mathematics will also further the appreciation of the development of Mathematics over time, establishing a greater understanding of its origins in culture and in the needs of society.

Advanced Programme Mathematics enables learners to:
extend their mathematical knowledge to solve new problems in the world around them and grow in confidence in this ability; 
use sophisticated mathematical processes to solve and pose problems creatively and critically;
demonstrate the patience and perseverance to work both independently and co-operatively on problems that require more time to solve;
contribute to quantitative arguments relating to local, national and global issues;
focus on the process of Science and Mathematics, rather than on right answers;
view Science and Mathematics as valuable and interesting areas of learning;
become more self-reliant and validate their own answers;
learn to value Mathematics and its role in the development of our contemporary society and explore relationships among Mathematics and the disciplines it     serves;
communicate mathematical problems, ideas, explorations and solutions through reading, writing and mathematical language;
enable students to become problem solvers and users of Science and Mathematics in their everyday lives. The study of Advanced Programme Mathematics    should encourage students to talk about Mathematics, use the language and symbols of Mathematics, communicate, discuss problems and problem solving,    and develop competence and confidence in themselves as Mathematics students.

EDUCATIONAL AND CAREER LINKS
Advanced Programme Mathematics is valuable in the curriculum of any learner who intends to pursue a career in the physical, mathematical, financial, computer, life, earth, space and environmental sciences or in technology. Advanced Programme Mathematics also supports the pursuance of careers in the economic, management and social sciences. The knowledge and skills attained in Advanced Programme Mathematics provide more appropriate tools for creating, exploring and expressing theoretical and applied aspects of the sciences. The subject Additional Mathematics in the Further Education and Training band provides the ideal platform for linkages to Mathematics in Higher Education institutions. Learners proceeding to institutions of Higher Education with Advanced Programme Mathematics will be in a strong position to progress effectively in whatever mathematically-related discipline they decide to follow. The added exposure to modelling encountered in Advanced Programme Mathematics provides learners with deeper insights and skills when solving problems related to modern society, commerce and industry. Advanced Programme Mathematics, although not required for the study of Mathematics, engineering, technology or the sciences in Higher Education, is intended to provide talented Mathematics learners an opportunity to advance their potential, competence, enthusiasm and success in Mathematics so that it is more likely that they will follow mathematically-related careers.

In particular; the following are some of the career fields that demand the use of high level Mathematics:
Actuarial Science
Operations research
Mathematical modelling
Economic and industrial sciences
Movie and video game special effects
Engineering
Computational Mathematics
Theoretical and applied physics
Statistical applications
Academic research and lecturing in Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Actuarial Science and Statistics

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Afrikaans Afrikaans
Purpose of the language curriculum:

The purpose of the language curriculum is to enable learners to acquire knowledge, to express their identity, feelings and ideas, to interact with others and to manage their world.

Course Outline
To broaden and deepen language competencies so that learners are able to listen, speak, read/view and write/present with confidence that forms a basis for life-long learning.

Use language appropriately and accurately in real-life contexts.
Express and justify their own ideas, views and emotions confidently in order to become independent and analytical thinkers.
Listen, speak, write and present the language with confidence and enjoyment.
Use the language and their imagination to find out more about themselves and the world around them.
Use language to access and manage information for learning across the curriculum.
Use language as a tool for critical and creative thinking.

Overview of language skills and content:

Listening and Speaking
Reading and Viewing
Writing and Presenting
Language

Assessment and Examinations

There is continuous assessment of oral and written work in normal class situations.
Writing is assessed continuously across a range of different tasks such as language and comprehension exercises as well as creative, transactional and      functional writing.
Class tests and standardised tests are written regularly.
Homework and assignments are given regularly.
Projects are given termly.
Examinations.

Paper I hours [100]
Paper II hours [100]
Continuous assessment: Portfolio [100]
Oral   [100]

Special Events

Afrikaans Olympiad
Pretoria Eisteddfod
National Eisteddfod
The Van Huyssteens Oratorical Festival
Digital Concert
Pit Production: Prescribed book and poems

Professional Intelligent Theatre (PIT), a company based on vision, passion and pure positivity, send a group of professional actors to schools to present a tailor-made performance of Afrikaans prescribed works. Performances are extremely energetic and are directed and choreographed by visionary directors.

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Business Studies Business Studies
Introduction

Economic growth and personal financial empowerment are largely dependent on the positive contribution of both business and individuals to the economy. Business takes place in an inherently complex context that requires informed, imaginative, participative, contributing and reflective business practitioners who can dynamically perform a range of interdependent business operations.

Business Studies deals with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values critical for informed, productive, ethical and responsible participation in the formal and informal economic sectors. The subject encompasses business principles, theory and practice that underpin the development of entrepreneurial initiatives, sustainable enterprises and economic growth.

Curriculum Outline
Grade 10, Grade 11 and Grade 12

Business Studies has the following core features: 

Business Environments:
This feature focuses on the different elements of the macro, micro and market business environments, as well as the complex and diverse nature of business sectors.  Learners must demonstrate knowledge and analyse the impact of changing and challenging environments on business practice in all sectors.

Business Ventures:
This feature focuses on the development of important factors that contribute to the creation of sustainable business enterprises. A key feature is the development of creative entrepreneurs who can identify and responsibly pursue productive business opportunities.   Learners must identify and research viable business opportunities and explore these and related issues through the creation of achievable business ventures.

Business Roles:
This feature covers the essential roles that learners need to perform in a variety of business contexts. Learners must be able to demonstrate and apply contemporary knowledge and skills to fulfil a variety of business roles.

Business Operations:
This feature should equip learners with the knowledge and skills to manage essential business operations such as human resources, public relations, marketing and production effectively. These need to be developed within the context of relevant legislation and contemporary issues.  Learners must demonstrate and apply a range of management skills and specialised knowledge to perform business operations successfully.

Progression in terms of the expected performance from one grade to another will ensure a high level of knowledge and skills. The content and context of each grade will also show progression from simple to complex.

Skills taught in Business Studies

This course will enhance the ability of a student to understand her “economic environment”.  Business Studies is a practical subject and the learner has therefore to become acquainted with all the activities, which illustrate the practical nature of the subject, such as commercial reports, articles in the newspapers and periodicals and examples from daily life.

Achievement of the Business Studies Learning Outcomes equips learners with a sound foundation to participate in future business, commerce and management studies, to enter business or to create self-employment.
 
Business Studies will ensure that learners:

acquire and apply essential business knowledge, skills and principles to conduct business in changing business environments productively and profitably;
create business opportunities, creatively solve problems and take risks, respecting the rights of others and environmental sustainability;
apply basic leadership and management skills and principles while working with others to accomplish business goals;
be motivated, self-directed, reflective lifelong learners who responsibly manage themselves and their activities while working towards business goals;
be committed to developing themselves and others through business opportunities and ventures.

In addition to being able to secure formal employment, learners need to be in a position to pursue sustainable entrepreneurial and self-employment career pathways. Business Studies also forms the foundation for further business learning opportunities. Business Studies encompasses relevant and contemporary theory and competence essential for promoting excellence and contributing towards sustainable business enterprises. It embraces constitutional goals and objectives through promoting accessible, legitimate and entrepreneurial business opportunities. The subject also provides opportunities for learners to consider present-day challenges within the South African policy framework. Skills such as decision-making, problem-solving, creative thinking, systems thinking and effective communication in a competitive and constantly changing environment are critical to this subject.

Enrichment and Special Events
The Grade 10 learners participate in “Discussion Fridays”. They are required to scan the media for current issues as topics of discussion.  Different opinions are valued and debating different viewpoints encouraged. This develops analytical thinking skills and substantiation of statements which are essential skills in answering Business Studies papers.

The Grade 11 learners participate in the JSE/ Liberty Life Challenge. The JSE Investment Challenge is an investment game for students where they learn the fundamentals of investing on the JSE. Participating teams test their share-trading skills through an on-going annual simulated trading programme in which their performance is tracked and measured over six months.

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Advanced Programme English Advanced Programme English

Advanced Programme English is an additional English course for learners who are interested in extending themselves through the study of English Literature. It will both stretch and stimulate learners in a very broad academic enrichment course. Candidates must display greater knowledge and depth of insight than is required for English Home Language at the NSC. An intense level of commitment is required as it extends beyond the syllabus and outside the classroom. Even though the skills acquired will make NSC English more accessible, they will demand more work than classroom English. It is seen as ideal but not exclusively for those learners who want to pursue an English course at tertiary level.

The AP learner will:

Draw on the recommended texts as well as other texts that they have encountered.
Be encouraged to draw broadly on their experience of a variety of texts.
Be able to apply their knowledge, compare and contrast, analyse and critique both seen and unseen texts.
Be able to reflect philosophically on the texts they have studied.

Learning Outcomes

Establishing connections between different genres, texts, trends and contexts.
Structuring arguments and insights in a coherent manner using accurate textual references.
Using cognitive skills to design critical judgements.

AP English is different:
AP English is delivered in a different way to NSC English. NSC demands are for candidates to respond to one text in a question; AP questions expect a response to incorporate an understanding of multiple texts. Learners will be expected to display an independence of spirit. Learners will display an attitude of self-reliance.

Structure and Weighting

Candidates will only write one 3 hour final examination at the end of Grade 12. Three essay questions which are each worth 100 marks: Poetry is compulsory; candidates choose 2 out of 3 of the following options:

Prose
Drama
Film

Candidates will need to read broadly across their chosen sections to be able to do justice to the demands of the questions. Studying one text is unlikely to be sufficient preparation for the rigour of the questions.

Question 1 - 100 Marks:
Rebellion and Revolution as a broad theme: This will be an essay in which candidates respond to stimuli which relate to the theme and to the range of texts that they have studied. Candidates must select texts they have studied from two of the following sections: prose, drama or film (in the film category, you will be expected to comment on directorial concerns). 

Question 2 - 100 Marks:
A comparative response to two of the prescribed poets or schools of poetry. This will be an essay in which candidates respond to a quotation or a visual which they must use as a departure point to discuss the schools of poetry which they have studied.

Question 3 - 100 Marks:
A question which will provide candidates with a quotation or visual stimulus which they can use as a springboard to reflect philosophically on their reading history. Candidates can draw on texts beyond the Advanced Programme to respond to this question.

Essays will not have a word limit. Candidates need to ensure that they can respond to the three questions in the three hours provided. Responses will be characterised by a strong own voice.

Contact Time
The girls will meet once a week to be presented with topics and discuss texts as set out. Preparation and reading of all the given texts will be essential. Attendance is vital. Class tasks will be completed for preparation of examination but will not be used for formal assessment, but as guidance on progress.

Advanced Programme English is offered in Grade 10, Grade 11 and Grade 12. The subject will be launched in the second term of Grade 10 when applications will be processed. It is recommended that girls interested in the subject should maintain a 70% average for Core English. This can be monitored at the end of Grade 10 and Grade 11.

The APE result is certified separately by the IEB and cannot be used for entrance into universities (i.e. it does not form part of the APS score required by universities). It is strongly recommended that a candidate should re-evaluate their enrolment in advanced programme english if any of their national senior certificate subjects fall below 60% for grade 12.

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Accounting Accounting
What is Accounting?

Accounting is the language of business. With the use of Accounting, one can tell the story of a business to an audience (role players).

As trade developed in the world, so too did the need to have some means of payment for goods, other than bartering one commodity for another.  Something of value was needed as a means of exchange = money! In these early days, Accounting developed because there was a need to keep a record of transactions entered into between people.  More recently, it has developed to a high degree of sophistication in determining the efficiency and value of complex companies.

Accounting is relevant to our everyday activities, as we all use money to purchase goods and services.  We all need a budget and we all need to understand our own personal finances. You may reason that the computer normally handles the recording processes for you, but in order to understand what the computer is doing, it is necessary to perform the processes manually first.

Curriculum Outline
There is considerable overlap and continuity between the grades, and work covered in the lower grades is incorporated into, and assessed throughout, the course.

Pupils who are considering taking Accounting as a subject must begin with the course at the beginning of Grade 10. Pupils will not be allowed to start Accounting at a later stage due to the ‘building blocks’ nature of the subject.

In Grade 10 we address and answer some of the following concepts and questions:
How do you measure and determine the performance of a business?
What is the difference between formal and informal bookkeeping systems?
How do I record cash and credit transactions?
Why is there a need for VAT?
Why is computerised accounting important?
Why is there a big difference between what my employer told me I am going to earn, and what I am actually paid?
Understanding and preparing of basic financial statements.
Managerial Accounting, which includes cost calculations of manufacturing businesses and basic budgeting concepts.
Internal control and ethics.

In Grade 11 we address and answer some of the following concepts and questions:
Is my bank statement telling the truth?
Do I make a profit or a loss when I get rid of my old car? Asset disposal.
If I open my own small business, should I make use of the periodic inventory system?
What if my best friend and I want to start a business together? Partnerships.
How does a budget assist me in making sure I have enough money when I need it?
How do I record the unfinished products of my factory?
If I am the treasurer of my tennis club, what is expected of me?

In Grade 12 we address and answer some of the following concepts and questions:
Do I understand how a company operates?  What are shares and dividends?
How can I use my cash budget to the business’s benefit?
Do my debtors pay me on time?
How much is my stock worth and which valuation method is the best for my business?
My business is making a profit but is it worthwhile, or should I investigate another investment?

Skills taught in Accounting
Lifelong learning is an integral part of growing, not only professionally but also personally.  In the September 2010 edition of the magazine Entrepreneur, in a special feature on learning, Leigh Swartz, director at Tuesday Consulting, said: “In an employment market in which a degree is considered an absolute basic, additional courses and skills can provide an important differentiator, and a track record of proactively pursuing on-going education shows both a curiosity for learning new things and a willingness to make a personal investment in self-improvement.” It is a well-known fact that, in most cases, the standard of living maintained by an individual is linked to the level of their education.

This is why the cornerstones that teachers provide during a learner’s schooling are key in facilitating the creation of responsible and active members of society. Studying Accounting teaches your daughter life skills, for example:

Learning how to think clearly and logically in order to make the correct financial decisions;
Self-discipline - if you do not handle your money in a disciplined manner your financial position could deteriorate and you could end up bankrupt;
Accuracy - if you are not accurate in, for example, determining cost prices, you are going to make a loss in your business;
Learning to be analytical - you have to analyse your results to make decisions regarding the future of your own finance;
Communication skills;
Role play;
Numerical skills;
Peer assessment;
Brainstorming.

Practicals, assignments and projects
Grade 10:
Pastel Grade 10
Effective use of Microsoft Excel by completing journals, ledgers and an asset register.

Grade 11:
Pastel Grade 11
A debate on various current topics, for example the influence trade unions have on the manufacturing sector.

Grade 12:
Pastel Grade 12
A case study that requires the analysis and interpretation of a Public Company’s financial statements.
 
Assessment and Examinations
Tests and examinations are set with the aim of evaluating insight, encouraging expression of opinions by pupils, and requiring analysis and interpretation of information.  The underlying aim is to assist all pupils to achieve their maximum potential, by providing a challenge to pupils at all levels of ability.

The pupils write two papers in the Accounting examination. Paper I focuses on the application of skills and Paper II focuses on problem-solving and analysis. The end-of-year examinations contribute 75% of the year mark.

Many of the Accounting activities are assessed by means of a portfolio or collection of work, for example: projects, presentations, simulations, case studies and debates. The portfolio constitutes 25% of the year mark.

Enrichment and Special Events
Virtually no bookkeeping process is done by hand these days, therefore it is important to be able to make use of an Accounting computer package. The pupils are familiarised with the Pastel School Package in Grades 10, 11 and 12. Pastel issues a certificate to those candidates who passed the examination with merit.

The Grade 11 and 12 girls can participate in the JSE /Liberty Life Investment Challenge in the Bulls and Bears Club, which runs every second Wednesday.

We often invite guest speakers to come and address the girls on relevant Accounting topics, for example, St Mary’s DSG Old Girl, Danielle Botha (née le Roux) who is a lawyer by profession, talked to all the Grade 11s and 12s about personal finance – a skill she found lacking with newly graduated students entering her firm.
 
Career Paths and Opportunities

  • Chartered Accountant
  • Agricultural Economist
  • Business Economist
  • Investment Analyst
  • Legal Advisor
  • Industrial Psychologist
  • Tax Consultant
  • Risk analyst
  • Financial Accountant
  • Banker
  • Business Manager
  • Internal Auditor
  • Marketing Manager
  • Sports/ Recreation Manager
  • Tourism / Hotel Manager
  • Actuary
  • Financial Manager
  • Econometrician
  • Information Manager / Programmer / System Analyst
  • Personnel Manager
  • Statistician
  • Trader

If you intend to follow any B Com university course, it is in your own interest to have Accounting as a subject.  The failure rate for first year students without Accounting is exceptionally high. This learning area introduces many practical aspects of finances.  Even if you study a very different course, for instance medicine, you still need to be able to handle and understand your finances.

In May 2013, the Manpower Group released its eighth annual Talent Shortage Survey on the top 10 jobs that are the hardest for employers to fill, and for the third year in a row, “Accounting and Finance” made the list. The reason is that no longer can any business afford not to have proper financial management. The profession and the subject can no longer be considered just for ‘bean counters’. The reality is that the majority of accountants work in a business environment, which requires them to handle a broad range of responsibilities beyond taxes, including financial planning, analysis, forecasting, internal controls and decision support. They are expected to be trusted advisors who can interpret the numbers to direct corporate strategy.

Accountants do not just speak the language of business – they are business.

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St Mary’s DSG Day of Discovery St Mary’s DSG Day of Discovery

St Mary’s DSG hosts an annual Day of Discovery.  The aim is to expose the girls to a world of career opportunities.

Presenters (Old Girls, parents and people from the community) currently in successful careers are invited to share their knowledge, experience and career passion with the girls in the form of a presentation. Presentations cover the following aspects of the respective careers:

What is the general job description?
Where and what course could be studied to pursue this career?
What is the duration of the course?
Is any further training or studies necessary after completion of the initial qualification?
Characteristics and interests needed for this specific career.
What aspects of the career are found to be the most satisfying?
What aspects of the career are people mostly unprepared for, or unaware of, starting in the workplace?
What are the promotion prospects for someone in this career?
Demand and job opportunities of this career.
Are there any specific difficulties/benefits that face women in this career?
Why is a career in this field recommended?

The evening is divided up into four sessions.  Each guest speaker is asked to do a 30 minute presentation followed by 15 minutes for questions in one of the first three sessions.  The fourth session is reserved for a keynote speaker.
All the girls from Grade 8 to Grade 12 attend three sessions of their choice.

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Grade 8 READ, THINK and WRITE Programme Grade 8 READ, THINK and WRITE Programme

READ, THINK and WRITE (RTW) is an innovative course, exclusively offered to St Mary’s DSG pupils. After conducting intensive research, attending numerous conferences and monitoring global trends, a carefully constructed programme for Grade 8 pupils was developed. Learning opportunities incorporate integrated studies and enable pupils to be exposed to a holistic education. 

Research skills, technology application, plagiarism workshops, leadership and team-building skills, summarising, reading and study skills and so forth are incorporated in order to optimise lifelong learning. Each lesson enhances learning by providing pupils with the challenges of real-life situations. In addition, the skills learned will ease the transition from school to tertiary education.

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Grade 9 Create Distinction Programme Grade 9 Create Distinction Programme

The aim of this programme is to provide a highlight for the girls in the Grade 9 year and at the same time contribute to the development of girls who will stand out in society and be a blessing to others as St Mary’s DSG “Created Distinction.”

At the core of this three-day programme is the learning of a skill that could initially be practised as a hobby but could also provide entrepreneurial opportunities for the future. Examples of skills learned are Dress and Pattern Design, Flower Arrangement, Cake Decorating, Pottery, Film Making and Photography. All course presenters are experts in their respective fields and have developed these skills into successful careers.

The programme is also complemented by talks on Etiquette, Wardrobe Planning, Skin Care, Colour analysis and accessories emphasizing femininity and sophistication.
To encourage group spirit and bonding amongst the Grade 9 group, fun activities such as line dancing and a foam party are added into the mix.

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Eco-Schools Programme Eco-Schools Programme

Eco-Schools is a school-based environmental management, certification and sustainable development education programme implemented in over 52 countries. Key features of the programme are holisitic, participatory approach and a combination of learning and action which make it an ideal way for schools to embark on a meaningful path for improving the environment in both the school and local community, and to influence the lives of young people, school staff, families, local authorities and NGOs. This also benefits the school in terms of whole-school development and improvement.

Eco-Schools is about improving environmental management at the school, as well as environmental learning. Educators draw on practical projects to strengthen environmental learning at the school. Each year the school strives to improve on their efforts, thereby qualifying for the internationally recognised symbol of excellence, the Eco-Schools Flag.

 

St Mary's DSG registered with the Eco-Schools Programme in 2014. After establishing a committee of Junior School staff, Senior School staff and parents, the first project identified was the implementation of the 3 recycling bin system in the classroom. During the first year, learners were taught about recycling processes, effect on the environment and how we could make a change. St Mary's DSG was awarded a BRONZE LEVEL at the end of 2014.

In the second year, the beginnings of a vegetable garden was started in both the Junior and Senior School. The gardens were maintained by the learners and all produce was donated to a local charity kitchen. In 2015, Bophelo Recycling Village was built taking recycling on the school property to a new level. We achieved our Green Flag at the end of 2016 with the introduction of the Annual Eco market, the Grade 9 Outreach Vegetable Garden Project to Hammanskraal and the Junior School WESSA week. During 2017 the school community focused on Heritage and Cultural. Celebrating cultural diversity through varies activities during the year. St Mary’s DSG was awarded a GOLD LEVEL at the end of 2017.

 

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Grade 8 Innovation and Entrepreneurship Expo http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=304571 Types of Laptops and Software Used What type of laptops and software will be used for this programme?

The Knowledge Centre (the Department responsible for the school’s ICT infrastructure, technical support, Computer Literacy teaching, Media Centre and teacher ICT support) has conducted extensive research into the type of computers and software package that would be best suited for the St Mary’s DSG Laptop Programme.

We have selected 2 laptop options for you to choose from.

Both laptops will include the following:
Acer Laptop
Microsoft Windows 7 / 10 Professional
Microsoft Office 2016 (Student edition)
Pre-loaded academic software including:
Geometer Sketchpad, Geogebra,  Autograph, Multimedia Science School 1 & 2, Afrikaans Dictionary, Sepedi Dictionary,  W spel, Adobe Photoshop CS6,      Adobe Acrobat Professional, Fireworks, VLC, FLV, Google-earth, Google-stars, Google-sketchup, Nero, Math-Pro, H Story
Utility Software (ESET Endpoint Antivirus 5.0)
Wireless mouse
Computer Bag that will protect the laptop
1-Year System Warranty (this excludes accidental damage)
Optional 3 year on-site warranty (at an additional cost)

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Introduction Introduction

St Mary’s DSG prides itself on providing relevant, world-class education and therefore also aims to prepare our girls for both the challenges and opportunities presented by technological advances.  The school has, over the years, become digital with two computer labs, digital cameras, SMART boards, an e-mail system for teachers and girls, the St Mary’s DSG external web site, the St Mary’s DSG intranet, and an extensive network of fibre optics and wireless access throughout the campus.

Computer technology has been integrated into the curriculum in both the Junior and Senior Schools.  In the past, St Mary’s DSG's computer labs were not able to cope with demands as teachers negotiated time slots for their classes, and often could not find an available slot.  Similarly in the afternoon the computers in the laboratories are insufficient for the number of girls, both day scholars and boarders, who want to do their research.  The St Mary’s DSG Laptop Programme which started for Grades 8, 9 and 10 in 2007 has alleviated this problem.

The importance of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the processing of data, communication and presentation of ideas has become increasingly apparent to everyone.  Whatever path your daughters choose to follow when they leave St Mary's DSG, they will encounter computers everywhere: in universities, in libraries and in all areas of commerce and industry.

There is now overwhelming evidence that a pupil's level of confidence and ability in using ICT, and the quality of work that they can produce, across the curriculum, increases dramatically when they have permanent access to their own computer.

As more and more universities require strong ICT skills from students, St Mary’s DSG feels it has a responsibility to prepare our girls to use technology effectively.  While one-to-one interaction between teachers and girls will never be replaced, St Mary’s DSG sees laptop technology as another tool for education.

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Ordering process Ordering process

Standardisation for technical support
Please contact admissions and complete an order form.
Laptops are only ordered once payment has been received.
Payment direct to St Mary’s DSG can be made by cash, credit card or electronic funds transfer. Payment for a laptop MAY NOT be charged to the pupil’s account.

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Owning a School Laptop Benefits of owning a laptop purchased through the school

Standardisation for technical support
On-site support and maintenance is especially important for boarders.We have 2 full-time laptop technicians employed to deal with technical problems and queries. It is impossible for the school to support other laptops.

Better pricing and after-sales service from suppliers
The school can negotiate better pricing and service from laptop suppliers. We have an established relationship with our suppliers and other software suppliers which allows room for negotiations especially in terms of pricing.
A loan laptop is provided if your daughter's laptop is being repaired
If your daughter’s laptop has to be sent in for repairs, a loan laptop will be provided (subject to availability of one). Please note we do not supply a loan laptop if you did not purchase through the school programme.

Software
The school provides a complete software solution including application software and a variety of subject-related packages that are included in the original price of the machine.  The value of the software is over R6000.
Exceptional quality and after-sales service
We regularly investigate all laptop makes and models keeping quality and pricing in mind. We specifically choose laptops that could last for the entire period your daughter is at St Mary’s DSG. We have decided on an Acer laptop for 2015. We have tried several suppliers and the after-sales service of Acer is exceptionally reliable.

What will this laptop offer your daughter?
Fast filtered Internet Access
Email (internal & world-wide)
File Back-up and Storage
Network Printing
Virus Software Management
Wireless Network Access, in most places in the school and all classrooms
Backup and support from the St Mary's DSG IT department with 2 permanent IT technicians on-site
On-Site loan computers
3 years insurance (accidental damage & theft) – at an additional cost
All software is included

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Contact Contact

For additional information, please contact the Knowledge Centre Manager:
Lizelle Bothma
Tel: (012) 366-0539
lbothma@stmarys.pta.school.za


For payment information please contact the Accounts Department:
Erika Pretorius
Tel: (012) 366 0518
epretorius@stmarys.pta.school.za

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Damage and breakdowns Damage and breakdowns

St Mary’s DSG will have laptops available to loan to any girl who has purchased the St Mary’s DSG laptop bundle if her computer cannot be repaired that day. Please note this is subject to the availability of a loan laptop at the time of repair. Acer has a next business day warranty.

Loan laptops are not provided for damage to laptops due to negligence (this includes a cracked screen).

Insurance may be included in the purchase of the laptops through the school plan at R360 per term.  The insurance cost will be charged through the school account.  Parents still need to pay the insurance excess of minimum R1000 per claim or alternatively 10% of the claimed amount.  The insurance covers accidental damage and/or theft of the laptop.

Daily wear and tear is not covered by the insurance.

Parents have the option of including the laptop on their personal home insurance policy.  In this case, parents must arrange repair or replacement of the laptop either privately or through their insurance.

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If I currently own a Laptop If I currently own a laptop, do I need to purchase a new one through St Mary’s DSG?

Unfortunately you will be expected to purchase a new one.\

We have experienced endless problems in the past with laptops not purchased through the school.

For a variety of reasons, the school cannot undertake to service laptops which are not part of the school scheme. Configuration of the school scheme laptops is undertaken with a master disk prepared by us.  This disk enables the initial configuration utilities for our many printers, email, Internet and other services.  This automated system will not work with other makes or specifications of laptops.  These would have to be configured manually. In addition, we want to offer ongoing support to pupils and, again, this is only practical on machines with which we are familiar and where we know the software and hardware settings.

Standardisation of hardware and software is crucial if laptops are used as an integrated part of classroom instruction.  Research of laptop schools indicates that standardisation promotes consistency in the curriculum, easy on-campus repair, collaborative use of common software, easy updates and equality among girls.  Girls who use non-school laptops will not have access to on-campus repair, or to the loan laptops. We have also seen in the past how students are disadvantaged when using their own non-school laptops during intranet tests and exams as some of the machines are not capable of functioning in a professional environment due to software constraints.

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Apple VS Windows Apple VS Windows

Please note that we operate in a Windows environment and all students are required to work in the Windows environment.

Why Windows OS?
All our servers run in the windows environment. The Windows software is allowing us to run the department and the laptop programme without little to no difficulty.

Apple is certainly a more expensive option than purchasing a Windows machine. For the same money you spend on a mac you can buy a state of the art Windows machine. We are not averse to Apple and run a successful iPad programme in the Junior School. This programme however runs separately from the domain and the students only use Apple applications. In the senior school we run a Windows only environment. Students will be at a disadvantage if they use Apple. We do not have certified Apple Mac technicians and we will not be able to provide any support on these machines.

Regarding the use of Apple on our Windows domain the following areas are problematic when users own Apple MacBooks:
• We are unable to manage the user’s login to their machine or assist with any issues regarding logging onto the domain.
• Printers, mapped drives and settings cannot be distributed via Group Policy.
• Antivirus and updates cannot be managed and downloaded via the server as is true for Windows domain users.
• Application compatibility is questionable. The academic software used is not always compatible with Apple.
• Access to the intranet and intranet testing is an issue when accessed via Safari.

From an educational perspective it is certainly more beneficial for students to own a Windows machine as they will receive full support from our IT staff.
The IT department review new technologies each year and we alwys try to provide an option that will ensure the best value for money.

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Reporting Reporting

All reporting is done electronically and can be accessed via the St Mary’s DSG website with log-in details provided by the school.

This reporting entails:
Ongoing feedback of results during the term. Keep in mind that different subjects will have differing numbers of assessments. All assessments will be scored as percentages, but the weighting of these in final scores will differ.
New girls receive a mid-term comment report during their first term at St Mary’s DSG providing feedback on their adjusting to the new school.
End of term reports containing a mark, level and comment is issued online once a term.
Formal examinations take place twice a year during July and November. Results during the second and third term are a combination of the School Based Assessment during the year and the examinations at the end of each term.

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Parent Consultations Parent Consultations
Special parents’ evenings are held once per term for each grade, in order to allow parents to discuss their daughter’s progress with all her teachers. A prior appointment time must be made with each teacher on-line on the school website. Teachers are also available to speak to parents in the afternoons by prior appointment.]]>
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Matric Results Matric Results
Guide to matric results:
Pass requirements at the end of Grade 12/NSC

To qualify for further study at
Higher Certificate Level
40% or more in English 40% or more in 2 other subjects 30% or more in 3 subjects
To qualify for further study at
Diploma Level
40% or more in English 40% or more in 3 other subjects (not LO) 30% or more in 2 subjects
To qualify for further study at
Bachelor Degree Level
40% or more in English 50% or more in 4 Subjects
(one of which could be English but not LO)
30% or more in 2 subjects
The language requirement for further studies at a South African institution is 30% for either English or Afrikaans at First Additional Language Level.

History of Matric results at St Mary’s DSG from 2008 until now

Note:
Caution must be exercised in the interpretation of a school’s matric results.
• Schools have different admissions policies. St Mary’s DSG accepts girls who come from a wide spectrum of academic ability and only exclude those who will     clearly not cope.
• The distribution of talent from one year to another differs markedly.

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IEB Examination Examining Body
St Mary’s DSG writes the National Senior Certificate examination through the Independent Examination Board (IEB), an organisation that is highly respected both nationally and internationally. It is an assessment body that is accredited by Umalusi, the South Africa statutory body responsible for quality assurance in school assessment. The IEB assessment focuses on the fundamental knowledge that underpins the curricula but then emphasises a deeper understanding of subject knowledge, substantiation of own views and multiple ways of looking at issues.

www.IEB.co.za

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Class Sizes Small classes provide the opportunity for teachers to learn to know each student and their learning preferences. Some students demand individual attention because they are determined to excel. Other students demand individual attention because they struggle. Others are pleasant but quiet and not demanding at all.

These are the ones that can easily slip through the cracks in large classes. At St Mary’s DSG classes are restricted to 25 students per class (26 in exceptional circumstances). In the senior grades, classes are on average 15 students per class. St Mary’s DSG strives for optimal student learning and development through small classes where students are known by their teachers.

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School Day The academic timetable at St Mary’s DSG Senior School is based on a 10-day cycle. We make use of a roll-over timetable to minimise the impact of public/school holidays and the need to finish early for sport matches on the frequency of academic lessons.

The school day starts at 7:35 in the morning with gatherings with a spiritual, organisational, motivational or nurturing nature such as whole school and house assemblies, chapel and tutor group meetings. The academic day consists of six lessons per day and the duration of the lessons is either 60 or 50 minutes. Provision is made for break in between. The formal academic day ends at 13:50.

After lunch, afternoons are filled with academic support, clubs, Advanced Programme lessons, and music and sporting activities.

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Introduction

The education in which St Mary’s DSG believes is faith centred, holistic, relevant and rigorous. The academic curriculum forms only a part of the total curriculum, albeit the critical part. Preparing young ladies for the IEB Senior Certificate in Grade 12 is the first goal, and our matric results year after year speak to the quality of teaching, the engagement with the IEB on many levels, and the tradition of hard work amongst our students.

In tertiary institutions our “Old Girls” stand out in their preparedness for academic life. We are extremely proud of our academic traditions but more proud of the difference our “Daughters of the King” make in the lives of those around them as a result of their preparation for life. – The Revd Canon AW Paterson

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Non-Plagiarism Declaration Non-Plagiarism Declaration.       
This needs to be included in every task submitted.

Non-Plagiarism Declaration & Authenticity Statement

I, _____________________________ (Full name), hereby declare that this assignment is my own, original work and that I did not plagiarise in the following project in anyway:

SUBJECT:   _________________________________________

PROJECT TITLE:   ____________________________________

Where a secondary source (verbal, printed or electronic) has been used, I have carefully acknowledged and referenced it in accordance with St Mary’s DSG’s Plagiarism Policy.

I include a full reference list of all sources used as proof. I understand what plagiarism is, and accept the St Mary’s DSG’s Plagiarism Policy in this regard.

I have also not allowed anyone else to borrow or copy my work.

Date:   _____________________

Signature:   __________________


Plagiarism Report.
Learners should put the final electronic version of their task through plagiarism-checking software and staple the plagiarism report to their Research Report/Essay as an additional means of protection. Turnitin is recommended as an effective plagiarism checker.

Some other suggested plagiarism checkers are:
http://www.plagiarism-detect.com
http://www.plagiarismchecker.com
http://www.duplichecker.com 
http://searchenginereports.net

If more than 15% of a submission is plagiarised, teachers must check the report.to establish exactly what has been identified and take the necessary action. There may in fact not be 15% plagiarism.
(IEB Copyright © One Research Task Option 2015-16)
Available from: http://
http://docs.ieb.co.za (Accessed: 25 November 2015)

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Policy on Submission of Work POLICY ON SUBMISSION OF WORK

The meeting of deadlines is an important life skill and learners need to master the art of time management before embarking on
higher education or entering the work place.

The policy of St Mary’s DSG is thus:

  • Learners will be given assignment sheets detailing the requirements of the assignment and the due date.
  • No assignments are to be given to learners for completion over a mid-term break or school holiday.
  • Learners are to hand in their assignments directly to the educator. Electronic submissions must be receipted. The return of the assignment electronically should also be receipted.
  • Should the learner fail to hand in the work on time because of ill-health, a doctor’s certificate is to be provided.
  • Should the learner fail to hand in the work on time for reasons that are not legitimate there will be a penalty of 25% after the 1st day and 50% after the 2nd day deducted from the mark. Thereafter failure to submit the work will result in no marks awarded. (Weekends count as one day.)
  • The end of the day for submission purposes is the end of the academic school day which is 13H50.
  • Should the pupil know in advance that they will be absent when an item is due for submission, then the work should be submitted in advance of the due date.
  • It is the learner’s responsibility to hand in work immediately when she returns to school after an absence, even if she is not scheduled to attend the specific subject on the day of return.
  • Each teacher should submit a list of late work offenders to the Grade Heads on a regular basis.
  • Parents MUST be contacted after three late work offences albeit in different subjects, but may be contacted at any point.
  • Pupils sent to the Head after three offences.
  • A disciplinary hearing will be held after 5 late works.
  • Matrics will have no latitude at all. Late work will be reported to parents immediately. They will see the Head with the teacher, Grade Head and Vice-Principal Academics.

3) POLICY ON TESTS AND EXAMINATIONS MISSED THROUGH ABSENCE

  • Learners who miss an assessment (for example, a test or an examination) through ill-health are required to provide a doctor’s certificate confirming this.
  • Learners who miss a test through ill-health or other legitimate reasons will be expected to write the test with the educator on afternoon duty at the soonest opportunity available as consulted with the subject teacher. This consultation should take place on the day she returns to school.
  • Learners who miss an examination through ill-health or other legitimate reasons will be expected to reschedule the examination date with the Vice-Principal Academics on the date of return.


ACADEMIC CODE OF CONDUCT

I, ________________________________________________ hereby declare that I have read and understood the contents of the Academic Code of Conduct and shall make every effort to comply with it. I understand that failure to comply with its contents will result in disciplinary action.

Signed by Learner: ______________________ Witness: ________________________

Date:     __________________________

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Accommodation Accommodation
In exceptional circumstances the IEB allows accommodations (usually for extra time, sometimes spelling) in the Matric examination for pupils with either physical disabilities or a history of learning difficulties. The success of an application for such an accommodation is dependent on specific documentary evidence of prior support or intervention. This needs to have been collected over a number of years. It is important to let the Health and Wellness Centre know timeously if any such difficulties exist.
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Extra lesson schedule

Group Sessions
Extra lessons take place in the afternoon between 14:30 and 15:15. Some subjects, for example English, Mathematics and Physical Science, have scheduled group sessions for the different grades. Pupils are encouraged to make use of the group sessions taken by different teachers, as a different way of explanation by a teacher other than your own can be beneficial.

Individual Support
Pupils are welcome to arrange individual extra lessons with any of the teachers. The use of outside tutors is not encouraged at St Mary's DSG.

SENIOR SCHOOL: WEEKLY ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMME

TIME MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

AFRIKAANS, SEPEDI & FRENCH

14:30 - 15:15/30  

 Afrikaans
GRADE 8 to 12
Mev. Booysen

Afrikaans
GRADE 8 to 12
Mev. Le Roux
French and Sepedi
GRADE 8 to 12
Afrikaans
GRADE 8 to 12
Mev. Jorissen
French and Sepedi
GRADE 8 and 9 Peer
tutoring
 

ACCOUNTING & EMS

14:30 - 15:15/30 GRADE 8 to 12 (Per individual appointment)  

ENGLISH

14:30 - 15:15/30    
 
GRADE 8- GRADE 9
 
   GRADE 10, 11, 12 (Per individual appointment)

CONSUMER STUDIES AND TECHNOLOGY

14:30 ?] 15:15/30
GRADE 8 to 12 (Per individual appointment)
 

HISTORY

14:30 - 15:15/30  
GRADE 8, 9
GRADE 11
GRADE 12
GRADE 10

MATHEMATICS

14:30 - 15:15/30   GRADE 8 to 12
GRADE 8 to 12 (Per individual
appointment)
GRADE 8 to 12 (Per individual
appointment)
 

MATHS LITERACY

14:30 - 15:15/30     GRADE 10, 11, 12    

PHYSICAL SCIENCES

14:30 - 15:15/30   GRADE 11 and 12      
GRADE 8 to 10 (Per individual appointment)

VISUAL ARTS

14:30 - 15:15/30  GRADE 8 to 12
(Per appointment)
     GRADE 8 to 12
(Per appointment)
 

LIFE SCIENCES

14:30 - 15:15/30
GRADE 8 to 12 (Per individual appointment)

AP ENGLISH

17:15 – 18:45  GRADE 10, 11, 12        

AP MATHEMATICS

14:30 – 15:30        GRADE 10 and 12  GRADE 10 and 11
17:30 – 19:00    GRADE 12    GRADE 11  
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The Wisdom or not of extra lessons The wisdom or not of extra lessons

Trend:
Extra lessons have become a “roaring business” as can be seen by adverts placed all over the internet, on lamp posts, in your spam box and on shopping mall notice boards. It has become a “fashion statement” to have a tutor for this and a tutor for that. Girls suffer from FOMO (Fear of Missing Out).  What happened to the good old fashioned “buckle down and work?”

Who should attend extra lessons?
Those pupils who are finding difficulties in a subject, the underperformers who need help to pass.
Those pupils that are just short of achieving a possible distinction and need an extra push to reach their goal.
Those pupils who missed out on a lesson for a legitimate reason.

What should happen during an extra lesson?
Concepts are taught in the class and often practice homework is given. If the pupil still struggles with certain concepts after she has done her homework, she should approach her own teacher for help in an extra lesson. Your own teacher should know your short comings and will be the best person to help. Saying that, it sometimes is also good to have a concept explained by a different teacher at the same school, who might explain it from another angle.
No pupil should come to an extra lesson and say; “I do not understand anything!” That means she has not applied her mind to the concepts and did not try to do it independently first. Group extra lessons are there to practise more examples of difficult concepts to increase your confidence in the topic.

Disadvantages of extra lessons with tutors:
Tutors are expensive.
Often the standard of tutors is not known.
Where are these lessons taking place? Can you ensure your daughter’s safety?
Pupils “switch off” in class, thinking that the tutor will explain it anyway later.
The tutor does the homework or assignments for the pupil.
Tutors are often not experienced teachers and teach the pupil incorrect methods or practices.
The opportunity to learn to work independently is lost.
Pupils tend to give up quickly and they are not determined to solve a problem themselves.
Pupils are “spoon-fed”.
Pupils “play around” in class instead of doing the home work and making use of time available in class to ask their teacher when they struggle.

In summary, St Mary’s DSG is a very good private school with small classes and individual attention. We have good quality and focused teachers who undergo regular staff development and are prepared to walk the extra mile. Your child is exposed to proper building blocks from year to year. Ideally it should not be necessary for your child to attend extra lessons and definitely not on a regular basis but only when it is absolutely necessary. So if your child insists on regular extra lessons, ask yourself the following question: “Is my child making full use of resources available or is she simply taking the easier route and use the extra lessons as a “cop-out”!”

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Academic Integrity Policy 1) ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY

Rationale:
This policy is guided by the collective values of the school, but especially by:

• Commitment
• Responsibility
• Honesty
• Self-confidence

St Mary’s DSG is dedicated to providing a caring and supportive environment to every individual in the school community. Therefore, our aim is not only to instill academic integrity for the learner’s school career, but also to equip them with good research skills for life.
At both tertiary institutions and in the work place, dishonesty has severe consequences: subject and course failure, immediate expulsion or discharge, criminal prosecution and more. These consequences have long-lasting implications.
Learners are encouraged to strive to produce work that is both original and referenced. Dishonesty in academic terms means the following:

Blatant Academic Dishonesty:
 - The use of supportive information (i.e. crib notes, books, calculator, conversation, cellular telephone) during a test or examination.
 - Copying another person’s work, or getting help or providing help in a test or an examination.
 - Allowing another person to copy their work and hand it in as their own.
 - Handing in the work of another person as one’s own.
 - Revealing the test content to learners who have not done the test.
 - Correcting incorrect answers and changing marks during peer/self assessment.

Subtle Academic Dishonesty:
 - Working on any assignment collaboratively, when it was clearly indicated that work was intended to be completed individually.
 - Allowing other persons to use one’s assignment as reference when preparing their own.
 - Submitting work for credit more than once.
 - Altering a result (using false results) from research or in laboratory experiments.
 - Allowing others to copy work.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism – “to take and use another person’s thoughts, writing, inventions as one’s own.”[Sykes 1980:842]

Plagiarism has increasingly become a problem as a result of the Internet and the ease with which information is available. Plagiarism is a huge threat in academic writing and it is important to know exactly what to look out for. As can be seen by the above definition, it is much more than just direct ‘copy and paste’.

You are guilty of plagiarism if:
• You copy from another source without acknowledging the source.
• You let someone else write it for you.
• You submit someone else’s work as your own.
• You steal an idea or concept without acknowledging the source, and use it as your own.
(Indiana University ISS [Homepage]

Types of plagiarism

Word for word
This is the most direct form of plagiarism, unless it is in quotation marks, AND the source is acknowledged.

Mosaic
This is the process of using embedded keywords or apt phrases (catchphrases) from a source, without differentiating it from your own writing.

Paraphrasing
This is the process of substituting keywords in the text.

Summary of a single source
This is where the entire piece of work is based on a single source which is merely summarised.

Misinterpretation of source material
This is where information is taken out of context and loses its original meaning, or is adapted to suit the argument of the writer.
(Adapted from: Excom Publishers, 2011, p163)

When quoting or citing, learners should indicate the source in the text and acknowledge it fully in their list of references. For example:
• 'Johannesburg is a crime ridden city' (Jones).
• Smith argues that stem cell research is the way forward for tissue repair (1999).

No further referencing detail, such as foot notes, is expected by the IEB. Further detail that is subject specific may be expected of learners. 
(IEB Copyright © One Research Task Option 2015-16)
Available from:
http:// http://docs.ieb.co.za (Accessed: 25 November 2015)

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Awards Academic Awards

Academic Colours awarded at Awards assembly

Grade 8
Academic Standard
80% Average over the two examinations in Grade 8
Grade 9
Academic Standard
Junior Award

80% Average over the two examinations in Grade 9
80% Average over the four examinations in Grade 8 and 9 (with a sub-min of 78% in each)
Grade 10  
Academic Standard
Half Colours

75% (525) in an examination in Grade 10
75% (525) Avg over the two examinations in Grade 10 (with a sub-min of 73% (511) in each)
Grade 11
Academic Standard
Half Colours

Full Colours

Honours
70% (490) in an exam in Grade 11
70% (490) Avg over the two examinations in Grade 11 (with a sub-min of 68% (476) in each)
75% (525) Avg over the two examinations in Grade 11 (with a sub-min of 73% (511) in each)
80% (560) Avg over the two examinations in Grade 11 (with a sub-min of 78% (546) in each)
Grade 12
Half Colours
Full Colours
Honours
70% (490) Avg in the Mock examination
75% (525) Avg in the Mock examination
80% (560) Avg in the Mock examination
Olympiads, French DELF exams and EXPO’s
Top 100 Placing
80% in the DELF level A2 and 75% in DELF level B1
Top 3 placing at Regional Science Expo
Top 3 placing at National Science Expo
Academic Standard


Junior Award

Academic Prizes awarded at Prize giving

In Grades 8, 9 and 10, prizes are awarded to the girls who have come in the top six positions during the year.
In Grades 11 and 12, prizes are awarded to the top 3 positions, as well as subject prizes.

Merit certificates are given to those girls who achieved an average of 85% in Grades 8, 9, 80% in Grade 10 and 75% in Grades 11 and 12.

There are also special prizes – The Yvonne Charlton Progress Prizes – which are awarded in each grade to those girls whose efforts have resulted in the greatest progress in improving their marks from Term 1 to Term 2.

Grade 10: Currie/van Schalkwyk Middle School Art Prize 
Grade 11 and Matric Prizes

Subject Prizes: 

To the pupil with the highest promotion mark on the Term 2 report. (A sub-minimum of 70% is required.)

Grade 11 Subject Prizes 
Accounting
Advanced Programme Mathematics
Afrikaans
Business Studies
Consumer Studies
Dramatic Arts
English
French
Geography
History
Immigrant French
Information Technology
Life Orientation
Life Sciences
Mathematics
Mathematical Literacy
Music
Physical Science
Sepedi
Visual Art

Grade 12 Subject Prizes
ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE AWARDS
Geography     
History     
Social Sciences 
(For the best Social Sciences Investigative Research Task in Grade 12). 
Currie/van Schalkwyk Senior Art  
The Standard Bank Prize for Art  
Most Improved Artist   
Dramatic Arts    
Senior Drama
(The Dramatic Arts pupil with the highest IEB Practical Moderation Mark)   
Music      
Maisie Mortimer Singing Trophy 
(The Maisie Mortimer Singing Trophy is awarded to a learner who takes Voice as an instrument, is a member of either St Mary’s Singers or Chapel Choir, and has made an exceptional contribution to the vocal tradition in the school through her vocal abilities and leadership.)
Senior Music Floating Trophy 
(The Subject Music Floating Trophy is awarded to a Senior Subject Music learner who has not only maintained a high academic standard (80% or higher) in the subject throughout the year but has also participated actively in St Mary’s DSG Music events, as well as in Music Festivals and/ Competitions outside of school.)
Baillie Award for Cultural Excellence
(The recipient should be in Grade 10, 11, or 12; must have excelled in at least two of the following: Drama (acting or stagecraft), choir, musical instrument playing, public speaking, painting competitions, quizzes or any other cultural activity; should have received Cultural Colours).

MATHS AND COMMERCE AWARDS
Advanced Programme Mathematics 
Judith Brown Prize for Mathematics 
Mathematical Literacy   
Accounting     
The Standard Bank Prize for Business Studies
Price Waterhouse Coopers Award
(For the top Matric in the combined studies of Accounting and Business Studies)
 
SCIENCES AWARDS
Physical Science    
Dr Basson Science Award
(For the top Matric in the combined studies of Mathematics, Science and Life Sciences)   
Life Sciences     
Excellence in Life Sciences Practical Work
Information Technology   
Consumer Studies    
Outstanding Practical Work in Consumer Studies

LANGUAGE AND LIFE ORIENTATION AWARDS
Hugh Brown Prize for English   
The Standard Bank Prize for Afrikaans 
Sepedi      
French      
Immigrant French    
Life Orientation    
Old Girls' Essay Prize 
(One book prize for each winner (Junior - Grade 7 – 9 and Senior- Grades 10-12) as well as Gold, Silver, and Bronze and highly commended certificates.) 
Rowena Navickas Award for Original Verse
(This competition is open to all pupils from Grade 8 – 12.  Each pupil who enters is required to submit a minimum of two poems. There is one book prize for the winner, but several Highly Commended certificates may also be awarded.)

General Prizes:
The General Knowledge Prizes:    
(There are two prizes for this category – Junior (Grade 8 – 10) and Senior (Grade 11 and 12). The main criterion for this award is that the pupil must have achieved good results in the World Knowledge Olympiad which is a national Olympiad. Usually the top achievers of this Olympiad are the recipients of the prize. An additional consideration is if the pupil represented St Mary’s DSG by participating in any other general knowledge competition such as the Rotary Inter-Schools Quiz.)

Ciska Tempest Science Expo Award
(This prize is awarded to a Grade 8 or 9 pupil, for excellent work in the Science Expo. The minimum criterion is that the pupil must have achieved outstanding results at the Regional Science Expo. Projects that progress into further rounds of the Science Expo (National and International) would automatically be considered above regional achievements even if their marks at regional level are not as high. (This is because the Expo judges also consider originality, presentation and thoroughness before recommending competing at higher levels.) Should there be more than one project in contention for the prize then the final mark will be the deciding factor. Pupils are allowed to work in pairs for the Expo, so the prize can be shared between two pupils who worked together on a project.)

Roger and Pam Wickens Prize for Conservation
(This prize can be awarded to a pupil from any grade in the school.  The pupil must have made a concerted, ongoing effort in any ecological sphere that would benefit the indigenous fauna or flora in the local community or the wider context of South Africa. Furthering their knowledge of conservation issue(s) and creating an awareness of this (these) amongst the community would also be considered as conservation. The work in this sphere must be significantly greater than the basic syllabus requirements for any grade.)

Price Award for Originality and Enterprise
(This prize can be awarded to any pupil in the high school immaterial of grade. The pupil must have displayed initiative (in any field) that led to an extraordinary achievement. Any staff member can recommend a pupil for this award. The achievement can be measured in terms of (i) recognition from a body outside of the school structure, (ii) financial reward for, or recognition of, unique business/technology developments (this could include patents that will be viable in the future) or (iii) the assistance provided by the pupil to a charity, organization or needy individual that resulted in the long term improvement of that entity’s circumstances (this excludes the contributions made by the Débutantes’ programme).

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 16, Issue 2
St Mary's Matters Volume 16, Issue 2 - 4 March 2016

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 16, Issue 1
St Mary's Matters Volume 16, Issue 1 - 31 January 2016

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Matric Results 2015

29 December 2015

Dear St Mary’s DSG Community

Matric results 2015

I am delighted to announce that the matrics of 2015 have done exceptionally well in their National Senior Certificate Examinations. 

It is important to note that matric classes vary widely in ability and that comparisons year by year are unhelpful and invidious. Similarly, admissions policies of schools vary. At St Mary’s DSG, Pretoria, only those girls who will clearly not cope with the academic standard are refused entry. Whilst we remain a strongly academic school, we are certainly not a school for the academic elite alone. Comparisons between schools are again invidious.

All candidates passed the exam for the 26th year in a row. 96.6% of the candidates obtained a BD pass which enables them to apply for a university degree course. This compares very favourably with the national IEB rate of 85.26%. The remaining candidates obtained a D pass which enables them to apply for a diploma course. These candidates have all qualified to write supplementary exams and should they choose to do so could convert their results to a BD.

184 distinctions were obtained with the following obtaining 5 distinctions or more:

Mignon Kriel  Mignon is listed in the IEB “commendable” list. In the top 1% for Afrikaans, Business Studies and Life Orientation.
Elizabeth du Preez 8 Elizabeth is listed in the IEB “commendable” list. In the top 1% for Afrikaans.
Jana Malan 8 In the top 1% for Afrikaans, Life orientation and Physical Science.
Chanel Maas 7 In the top 1% for Life Orientation.
Khanya Papu 7 In the top 1% for Life Science and Physical Science.
Gabriella Kwant 6
Lexi Ligeti 6  
Kaylin Pather 6  
Catherine Uys 6  
Juju da Silva 5  
Alexia Katranas 5  
Reitumetse Malefane 5  
Oyindamola Oni 5  
Kendra Sinovich 5  

Tegan Schutte was in the top 1% for Afrikaans.

Divine Ile was in the top 1% for French 2nd Additional Language

These may change if any requests for re-marks are successful.

The distinctions per subject and a comparison with the national IEB distinction rate is found below:

Subject

Number of Distinctions

St Mary’s DSG %

IEB %

Accounting

9

29%

18.8%

Afrikaans

12

20.6%

11.8%

Business Studies

10

20.4%

13.3%

Consumer Studies

2

16.6%

9.5%

Drama

6

31.6%

38.6%

English

25

27.7%

15.5%

French 2nd Additional Language

4

23.5%

39%

Geography

5

22.7%

15.6%

History

10

41.6%

21%

Information Technology

4

36.4%

31.7%

Life Orientation

37

41.1%

33.8%

Life Science

13

34.2%

20.6%

Maths Literacy

8

33.3%

42.4%

Mathematics

13

18.5%

29.3%

Music

2

20%

29.3%

Physical Science

8

20%

16.6%

Sepedi

4

25%

5.7%

Visual Art

7

63.6%

29%

AP English

1

AP Maths

3

A very pleasing aspect of these results was that 93% of all results were above 50%. 60% of results were above 70%.

It is also important to note that 78% of our girls took Mathematics, whereas the national rate is 65%. Girls are encouraged to move to Maths Literacy only if it is in their very best interests to do so.

The Table below illustrates the difference between the St Mary’s DSG Average and the National Average per subject:

SUBJECT

St Mary’s DSG

IEB

Accounting

70.50%

62.57%

Afrikaans

66.55%

60.46%

Business Studies

68.64%

62.65%

Consumer Studies

66.08%

65.65%

Drama

75.74%

75.74%

English

71.89%

68.60%

French 2nd Additional Language

72.63%

72.67%

Geography

67.66%

64.81%

History

75.10%

67.97%

Information Technology

70.37%

68.91%

Life Science

73.02%

64.48%

Maths Literacy

75.43%

75.12%

Mathematics

64.15%

63.27%

Music

71.48%

71.48%

Physical Science

66.78%

60.46%

Sepedi

69.98%

71.32%

Visual Art

77.26%

70.65%

I must congratulate the class of 2015, and their teachers for these results.

I conclude with an excellent paragraph from the CEO of the IEB, Anne Oberholzer’s national press release which I wholeheartedly endorse.

“The 21st century citizen must not only be able to comprehend and empathise – they must have the courage to uphold the ‘common good’. This means challenging any attempt to unfairly discriminate against specific groups in our society or undermine the rights of individuals. It means holding people accountable for their commitments and their opinions. When we talk about educating young people, it means so much more than ensuring the achievement of good results in the NSC examinations or developing flawless technical know-how. It means providing young people with the power to think for themselves, to come to well-thought through opinions that can be defended as moral, rational and socially constructive. In the context of South Africa, in all that we have achieved and in the many challenges ahead and disparities that still exist in our country, this cannot be emphasized enough for our young people.”

With very best wishes for the New Year

The Revd Canon Angus Paterson

(Head of School)

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Subject Keys Grade 10-12 in 2016 Grade 10

Key 1

Key 2

Key 3

Key 4

Key 5

Key 6

Key 7

English

Afrikaans

Mathematics

Life Orientation

Physical Science

Physical Science

Life Sciences

Sepedi

Mathematical Literacy

Life Sciences

Accounting

Dramatic Arts

Immigrant French

Business Studies

Business Studies

Visual Art

Dramatic Arts

Consumer Studies

Accounting

Geography

History

French

Music

Information Technology

 

Grade 11

Key 1

Key 2

Key 3

Key 4

Key 5

Key 6

Key 7

English

Afrikaans

Mathematics

Life Orientation

Physical Science

Physical Science

Life Sciences

Sepedi

Mathematical Literacy

Life Sciences

Accounting

Dramatic Arts

Immigrant French

Business Studies

Business Studies

Visual Art

Dramatic Arts

Consumer Studies

Accounting

Geography

History

French

Music

Information Technology

 

Grade 12

 

Key 1

Key 2

Key 3

Key 4

Key 5

Key 6

Key 7

English

Afrikaans

Mathematics

Life Orientation

Physical Science

Physical Science

Life Sciences

Sepedi

Mathematical Literacy

Life Sciences

Accounting

Dramatic Arts

Immigrant French

Business Studies

Business Studies

Visual Art

Dramatic Arts

Consumer Studies

Accounting

Geography

History

French

Music

Information Technology

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Subject Choice for Grade 8 and Grade 9 in 2016 November 2015

Dear Prospective Grade 8 Zulu Speaking Parents

The Governing Body has recently approved the phasing in of isiZulu as a First Additional Language offering to Gr 8 and 9 pupils. This amends the subject choices sent to you slightly.

Our current (2015) language requirements are as follows:

  • English home language (compulsory for everyone)
  • A choice of Afrikaans/Sepedi/Immigrant French as a First additional Language (compulsory for everyone)
  • French second additional language (choice subject)

For 2016, your daughter has the option to take isiZulu as a First Additional language in the place of Afrikaans/Sepedi under the following conditions:

  • Lessons by an experienced Zulu teacher will be offered at school in the late afternoons twice a week for two hours. (Times to be confirmed.) There will be no additional costs. We intend for a fulltime teacher to be appointed in 2017.
  • In the mornings, during the First Additional Language lesson times, a venue will be made available where your daughter could work on her isiZulu homework and self-study under supervision.
  • Tests and examinations will take place during the morning timetable in conjunction with Sepedi assessments.
  • For your daughter to qualify for this option she must be an isiZulu home language speaker or have a demonstrated ability in languages.
  • This will enable the girls to take isiZulu for Matric.

The Subject choice information is therefore amended to incorporate isiZulu as a First Additional Language as follows:

 

SUBJECT CHOICES IN GRADE 8 AND 9

At St Mary’s DSG there are two subject choice selections that your daughter needs to make at the beginning of Grade 8 (AND continuing in Grade 9).

  • She has to select a specific First Additional Language.
  • She has to select two choice subjects.

Kindly consider the following carefully:

FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE OPTION

  • Please select a First Additional Language from Afrikaans, Sepedi, Zulu or Immigrant French. Last mentioned is only an option if your daughter qualifies as an immigrant candidate. (See details below)

·         The First Additional Language selection that your daughter makes will imply a five year commitment.

·         If your daughter intends to do Afrikaans, Sepedi or Zulu, her acceptance to the course will depend on her capability in this language.

·         If your country of origin is not South Africa and one of the conditions mentioned below applies, she may select Immigrant French as a Second language:

An immigrant candidate is:

(i)            A child or a dependant of a diplomatic representative of a foreign government accredited in South Africa; or

(ii)           A person who:

(a)        First enrolled at and entered a South African school in Grade 7 or a more senior grade. (Therefore if your daughter’s South African schooling started at Grade 6 or earlier, this option is not permitted and she is, consequently, limited to either Afrikaans or Sepedi as a First Additional Language), or

(b)        having begun her schooling at a school in South Africa, has attended school outside South Africa for two or more consecutive years after Grade 3 or its equivalent and before Grade 9 or its equivalent, and has subsequently returned to South Africa.

·         Immigrant French learners are required to submit an Immigrant Status Application form with registration. This form is available from the Admissions Secretary.

 

CHOICE SUBJECTS

Your daughter has to select two subjects from the following:

(i)            Art

(ii)           Drama

(iii)          French (Non-immigrant pupils only)

(iv)         Music*

*If Music is chosen, as a choice subject, the following requirements must be kept in mind:

·         In Grade 8 and 9, there are two music options available:

Option 1: Introduction to Subject Music

Option 2: Advanced Music

·          This option must be chosen if a student is interested in learning more about music, but does not currently play a musical instrument or plan to start playing a musical instrument.

·          The course will entail basic music theory (pre-Grade 1), music appreciation (from Classical to Rock) and basic keyboard skills.*

*This will be taught in group format.  It is essential for a better understanding of music theory. Learners will not be expected to have a piano or electronic keyboard at home.

·      This option must be chosen by students who have been taking instrumental lessons and wish to continue with their lessons, or students who are interested in starting to play an instrument.

·      The course will entail music theory (Grade 1 and 2), music appreciation (from Classical to Rock), aural skills and practical music.

·      Practical music lessons are taken in the afternoons, at extra cost to the parent.

·      It is expected that a student receives at least 1 hour of practical music lesson per week.

·      It is expected that a student will play an external practical exam (ABRSM, UNISA or TCL) once a year.

 

Kindly note the following:

·      Practical tuition is offered in Piano, Organ, Flute, Recorder, Clarinet, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone, Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass, Drumkit, Contemporary Vocal Training, Classical Vocal Training, Trumpet and Trombone.

·      All group lessons are taught during the morning as part of the academic programme.

·      Accompaniment session costs for orchestral instruments that require piano accompaniment (rehearsals and performances) are to be absorbed by the parents for students in Grade 8 and 9.

·      Grade 10 candidates wishing to continue with Subject Music (to Matric) must already have passed the Grade 3 practical examination AND have a theoretical qualification equal to Grade 3.

·      Practical lesson costs (limited to one instrument) are absorbed by the school for Subject Music students in Grades 10, 11 and 12. Any additional instrumental lessons are to be paid for by the parent.

·      Accompaniment session costs for orchestral instruments that require piano accompaniment (rehearsals and performances) are to be absorbed by the school for Subject Music students in Grade 10, 11 and 12.  Please note that this would be limited to one instrument

·      Practical music lessons are also offered as a non-academic, extra-mural activity. Details and application forms are available from the Music Centre Manager in the Performing Arts Centre.

 

In order to facilitate class list arrangements and timetabling for 2016 prior to the start of the new academic year, we require you to indicate the three subject options of your choice on the attached sheet and return it to the Admissions Secretary, Mrs. Seipato, no later than 20 NOVEMBER 2015.

Please do not hesitate to contact us, should you require additional information.

Yours sincerely                                                                                                                                                                      

MRS. J.MILLER                                                                                                                                                                            VICE-PRINCIPAL: ACADEMICS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PLEASE RETURN TO ST MARY’S DSG BY 20 NOVEMBER 2015

GRADE 8/9 SUBJECT CHOICE 2016


Name of Learner: ……………………………………………………………………………………………..

 

FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE OPTION

Kindly tick the box of your choice

Afrikaans

Sepedi

Zulu

Immigrant French

 

CHOICE SUBJECTS

Kindly tick two appropriate boxes

Art

Drama

French Second Additional Language (Non-immigrant pupils only)

Introduction to Subject Music

Advanced Subject Music

 

If Advanced Music is selected please complete accordingly:

Instrument

Institution / School (UNISA / ABRSM / TCL / OTHER)

Last music grade completed (practical)

Last theory exam passed

Signature: ……………………………………..Date: .…………….………………

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 8
St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 8 - 6 November 2015

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 7 St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 7 - 30 September 2015]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=254705 St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 6 St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 6 - 7 August 2015
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St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 5
St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 5 - 26 June 2015

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 4 St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 4 - 29 May 2015]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=188561 St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 3 St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 3 - 2 April 2015]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=163702 St Mary's Matters - Volume 15, Issue 1 St Mary's Matters Volume 15, Issue 1 - 30 January 2015]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=143500 Matric Results 2014 2014 Matric Results

100% pass 25 years in a row.

99% BD pass (university endorsement). This is the highest for a long time. IEB has 85.45% BD pass overall.

138 distinctions from 80 candidates.

Those with 5 or more distinctions are:

 Corine de Koker 9
Megan Tarantal 8 IEB Outstanding list. Well done Megan!
Charlene Lau 8
Kearebetswe Malele 7
Bianca Stead 6
Maritsa Kyriacou 5
Danielle Lawther 5
Angel Lie 5
Oska Olsen 5
Marit van Schlichting 5

Well done Class of 2014. BORN TO FLY. ]]>
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St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 16 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 16 - November 2014]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=133824 St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 15 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 15 - September 2014]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=133821 Application Form Clearance Certificate - (71 KB)
Application Form - (700KB)
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Combined Fee Schedule 2018 Combined Fee Schedule 2018 - (486KB)
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St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 14 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 14 - 31 July 2014]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=117764 St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 13 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 13 - 26 June 2014 - (15 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=111830 St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 12 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 12 - 30 May 2014 - (16 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=111736 Criteria for special prizes and trophies The Maisie Mortimer Singing Trophy:

The Maisie Mortimer Singing Trophy is awarded to a learner who takes Voice as an instrument, is a member of either St Mary’s Singers or Chapel Choir, and has made an exceptional contribution to the vocal tradition in the school through her vocal abilities and leadership.

The Senior Music Floating Trophy:

The Subject Music Floating Trophy is awarded to a Senior Subject Music learner who has not only maintained a high academic standard (80% or higher) in the subject throughout the year but has also participated actively in DSG Music events, as well as in Music Festivals and/ Competitions outside of school.

Old Girls’ essay competition:

The Old Girls provide the essay topics and mark the essays. They give one book prize for each winner (Junior - Grade 7 – 9 and Senior- Grades 10-12) as well as Gold, Silver, Bronze and highly commended certificates.                                        

The Rowena Navickas Award for Original verse      

This competition is open to all pupils from Grade 8 – 12 and needs to be launched via a notice in Assembly. Each pupil who enters is required to submit a minimum of two poems.

There is one book prize for the winner, but several Highly Commended certificates (printed in-house) may also be awarded.

The Senior Drama Prize:

The Dramatic Arts pupil with the highest IEB Practical Moderation Mark

The General Knowledge Prizes:                                               

There are two prizes for this category – Junior (Grade 8 – 10) and Senior (Grade 11 & 12). The main criterion for this award is that the pupil must have achieved good results in the World Knowledge Olympiad which is a national Olympiad. Usually the top achievers of this Olympiad are the recipients of the prize. An additional consideration is if the pupil represented St Mary’s by participating in any other general knowledge competition such as the Rotary Inter-schools Quiz.

The Dr Basson Science Award (for the top Matric in the combined studies of Math, Science and Life Sciences)          .

The Price Waterhouse Coopers Award (for the top Matric in the combined studies of Accounting and Business Studies).

The Social Sciences Prize for the best Social Sciences Investigative Research Task.

Ciska Tempest Science Expo Award

This prize is awarded to a Grade 8 or 9 pupil for excellent work in the Science Expo. The minimum criterion is that the pupil must have achieved outstanding results at the Regional Science Expo. Projects that progress into further rounds of the Science Expo (National & International) would automatically be considered above regional achievements even if their marks at regional level are not as high. (This is because the Expo judges also consider originality, presentation and thoroughness before recommending competing at higher levels.) Should there be more than one project in contention for the prize then the final mark will be the deciding factor. Pupils are allowed to work in pairs for the Expo, so the prize can be shared between two pupils that worked together on a project.

Roger and Pam Wickens Prize for Conservation

This prize can be awarded to a pupil from any grade in the school.  The pupil must have made a concerted, ongoing effort in any ecological sphere that would benefit the indigenous fauna or flora in the local community or the wider context of South Africa. Furthering their knowledge of conservation issue(s) and creating an awareness of this (these) amongst the community would also be considered as conservation. The work in this sphere must be significantly greater than the basic syllabus requirements for any grade.

Price Award for Originality and Enterprise

This prize can be awarded to any pupil in the high school immaterial of grade. The pupil must have displayed initiative (in any field) that led to an extraordinary achievement. Any staff member can recommend a pupil for this award. The achievement can be measured in terms of (i) recognition from a body outside of the school structure, (ii) financial reward for, or recognition of, unique business/technology developments (this could include patents that will be viable in the future) or (iii) the assistance provided by the pupil to a charity, organization or needy individual that resulted in the long term improvement of that entity’s circumstances (this excludes the contributions made by the Debutants’ programme).

The Baillie Award for Cultural Excellence

The following are guidelines for the award:

The recipient

1             should be in Grade 10, 11, or 12;

2             must have excelled in at least two of the following: Drama (acting or stagecraft), choir, musical instrument playing, public speaking, painting competitions, quizzes or any other cultural activity;

3             should have received Cultural Colours

Service to the school awards (for service in various spheres of school life)

Head of St Mary’s Singers

Head of Chapel Choir

Head of the Orchestra

Sacristan Awards

Technical Monitors and Library Monitors

The Serena Stevens Good Fellowship Award (nominated by her peers)

This is awarded to someone in the Matric class who has displayed loyalty, friendship and trust towards her peers, staff and school throughout her career at St Mary’s DSG.

Special presentation to girls who have been at DSG for 13 years – their whole school career from Grade 0 to Matric:

SPORTS WOMAN – BEST ALL ROUNDER OF THE YEAR

The following route is followed to select the Sports Woman – Best All Rounder of the Year. This trophy is handed out at the Senior School Prize Giving.

1             A list of candidates with all their achievements is compiled by the Sports Manager with input from the staff involved in the different sports.

2             The Sports Manager and Sports Organizers then have a meeting to discuss the award.

3             The result of the above meeting is then forwarded by the Manager to the Awards Committee for final approval.

The criteria for the Sports Woman – Best All Rounder of the Year award are as follows:

  • The award will go to the Best All Rounder.

i)             The number of sports the athlete participates in will be taken into account.

ii)            The level of participation in each sport will be taken into account.

  • The award can only be awarded to a person who participates in sports that is offered at St Mary’s DSG.
  • Loyalty, sportsmanship, availability, attendance at practices, functions or meetings, team spirit, behaviour in class (academic)  etc, must be of the highest order before a pupil can receive this award:  these factors cannot, however, serve as the reason for an award where performance criteria are not met.

The Bishop Michael Nuttall Courtesy Cup

This is awarded to someone in the Matric class who has shown courtesy at all times towards her peers, staff and school throughout her career at DSG

(Voted for by staff)

The Ratcliffe House Trophy

(House Shield)

Each year, girls collect Merit marks for their houses. These are given for academic effort and success in many other fields. In addition, the Houses score marks for winning Inter-House sporting events, plays, quizzes, music and public speaking.

CSMV AWARDS

A small medallion in silver and enamel (blue for the Senior School award, brown for the Junior School award) which may be worn with school uniform as a pendant.

Girls who receive the Junior School award will be entitled to wear it in the Senior School for their Grade 8 year only.  

Girls in Grades 11 and 12 in the Senior School are eligible for the award.

This is the highest award a girl can receive at St Mary's.  It is intended to provide recognition for a girl who participates wholeheartedly in many different spheres of school life, whose attainments are highly commendable and whose character displays admirable qualities.

Mechanics of the award

Separate meetings of the staffs of the Junior and Senior schools will be convened during the last term of each year in order to make the CSMV awards.  Names of candidates must be displayed on the staff room notice board at least seven days before the meeting and must be sponsored by two members of staff. The granting of an award to any individual shall require the approval of the Head of the School.

Criteria for the award

Nominees for the award must gain majority approval from a meeting of the full staff of the respective schools in the first four of the following criteria, and in at least one of the remaining criteria:

1.2.1   Academic application

1.2.2   Conduct

1.2.3   Courtesy

1.2.4   Commitment and involvement in sport and other Co-curricular activities

1.2.5     Service to the school and others

1.2.6     Initiative

1.2.7     Inter-personal relationships

In making the award, consideration must be given to the previous two years of a pupil's school life, unless the pupil has been at St Mary's for less than that time.  Pupils must have been at the school for at least one year.

The Disciplinary Committee may deprive a girl of the CSMV Award in a case of serious misconduct, or if it is felt that for a reasonable period of time the standard of her school life has fallen below that which was recognised by the presentation of the award.

THE INDICTA AWARD

Indicta is an adjective in Latin for: untold, unnamed, unsung

This Prize is to recognise all the Unsung heroes of the school, in one girl. It recognises that many a matric has given her all, has lived the faith and values of the school. By recognising one girl it is acknowledged that the richness of the school extends far beyond the normal assessment of excellence to that of depth of character and commitment.

The PRINCIPAL’S AWARD

The Principal’s award is given in recognition to a Matric girl who has stood out amongst the others in going the extra mile in all that she does.

VICE HEAD GIRL’S AWARD       

HEAD GIRL’S AWARD     

DUX AWARD           (Cross Presented in a box)

The Dux Award is based on the following criteria:

The pupil with the highest promotion mark average on the Grade 12 Term 2 report.

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Awards awarded at prize giving In Grades 8, 9 and 10, prizes are awarded to the girls who have come in the top six positions during the year.

In Grades 11 and 12, prizes are awarded to the top 3 positions, as well as subject prizes.

Merit certificates are given to those girls who achieved an average of 85% in Grades 8, 9, 80% in Grade 10 and 75% in Grades 11 and 12.

There are also special prizes – The Yvonne Charlton Progress Prizes – which are awarded in each grade to those girls whose efforts have resulted in the greatest progress in improving their marks from Term 1 to Term 2.

Grade 10: Currie/van Schalkwyk Middle School Art Prize 

Grade 11 and Matric Prizes

Subject Prizes:

To the pupil with the highest promotion mark on the Term 2 report.

A sub-minimum of 70% is required.

Afrikaans

Accounting

History

Mathematics

Mathematical Literacy

Life Sciences

Business Studies

Music

Advanced Programme Mathematics

Physical Science

English

Geography

Information Technology

French

Immigrant French

Visual Art

Consumer Studies

Sepedi

Dramatic Arts

Life Orientation                   

 

ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE AWARDS

Geography                                                   

History                                                           

Social Sciences                                          

Currie/van Schalkwyk Senior Art             

The Standard Bank Prize for Art              

Most Improved Artist                                   

Dramatic Arts                                               

Senior Drama                                              

Music                                                            

Maisie Mortimer Singing Trophy              

Senior Music Floating Trophy                  

Baillie Award for Cultural Excellence

 

MATHS AND COMMERCE AWARDS

Advanced Programme Mathematics       

Judith Brown Prize for Mathematics       

Mathematical Literacy                                

Accounting                                                  

The Standard Bank Prize for Business Studies

Price Waterhouse Coopers Award          

           

SCIENCES AWARDS

Physical Science                                        

Dr Basson Science Award                        

Life Sciences                                                           

Excellence in Life Sciences Practical Work

Information Technology                            

Consumer Studies                                     

Outstanding Practical Work in Consumer Studies

 

LANGUAGE AND LIFE ORIENTATION AWARDS

Hugh Brown Prize for English                             

The Standard Bank Prize for Afrikaans  

Sepedi                                                                      

French                                                                      

Immigrant French                                       

Life Orientation                                           

Old Girls' Essay Prize                                             

Rowena Navickas Award for Original Verse

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The Filia Award for sports / cultural activities which are not part of the school curriculum This will be a Special Award for outside sports and cultural activities e.g. dance, karate, sailing etc.

General criteria 1, 4 and 5 in Section B of the Awards Criteria will also apply.

The award must be for a recognised sport or activity and the recipient must be selected for a provincial A team or national team.

In the case of cultural activity, the recipient’s achievements will all be taken into account.

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Cultural Awards Cultural awards may be given for any cultural activity offered by the school.  At present, these are the following:  Music, Art, Drama and Public Speaking. Participation in school-based activities in a particular field is a prerequisite for an award, e.g. Inter-House Competitions, Concerts and Productions.  If achievements are all in one discipline, the award will be specific to that field.

Special Achievement Award:

High level of performance in Inter-House Cultural Competition (Drama, Music, Public Speaking) and any other unlisted cultural category.

Cultural Standard:

Impressive level of performance in one field of culture in one year.

Special Cultural Standard:

Excellent level of performance in one field of culture in one year.

Outstanding Cultural Standard:

Superior level of performance in one field of culture in one year.

Half Colours

Two to four standards, one of which must be earned in Grades 10 to 12, will entitle a pupil to Half Colours.  However, Full Colours or Honours cannot be earned through accumulative standards.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half Colours.

X2 Special Cultural Standards 

X3 Outstanding Cultural Standards 

X4 Cultural Standards

  Junior Award (Grades 8-9)

Half Colours (Grades 10-12)

 Junior Award:  Girls gaining two to four standards in Grades 8 to 9, or achieve an outstanding level of performance in one field of culture in one year, will receive a Junior Award.
 Full Colours  Winner on National level (only individual instrumentalists)
 Honours  Winner on International level (only individual instrumentalists)

Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

Music  

Special Award

  • The certificates below may be awarded or withheld at the discretion of the adjudicating panel.
  • Inter-House Music Competition: Best Choir Accompanist.
  • Inter-House Music Competition: Best Choir Conductor.
  • Inter-House Music Competition: Best Choir Choreographer. (No external assistance is allowed).

Cultural Standard

  • Two or more A+s or an A++ in an acknowledged Eisteddfod e.g. Pretoria Eisteddfod, Centurion Arts Festival, Pro Arte Arts Festival, or any other eisteddfod of the same standard. (The candidate may not perform her chosen repertoire in more than one Eisteddfod.)
  • University of Pretoria Youth Choir
  • Jacaranda Children’s Choir
  • Tshwane Youth Orchestra
  • Pretoria Youth Philharmonic Orchestra
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Practical
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Theory
  • TCL Rock School and TCL Rock and Pop Grade 7 Practical

Special Cultural Standard:

  • Trophy winner of a particular category or section in an acknowledged Eisteddfod, e.g. Pretoria Eisteddfod, Centurion Arts Festival, Pro Arte Arts Festival, or any other eisteddfod of the same standard. (The candidate may not perform her chosen repertoire in more than one Eisteddfod.)
  • Philip Moore or any other recognised National / Regional  Music Competition: Participant in Round 1
  • ATKV Applous Choir Competition: National Participation
  • TCL Rock School and Rock and Pop Grade 7 Practical Merit.
  • TCL Rock School and Rock and Pop Grade 8 Practical.
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Practical Merit
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Theory Merit
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Theory
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Practical
  • UNISA Roll of Honour / High Scorers’ Concert of any of the three examination boards’ Grade 5 Practical

Outstanding Cultural Standard:

  • Philip Moore or any other recognised National / Regional  Music Competition: Participant in Round 2 (semi-finalist)
  • ARTSCAPE Competition: Finalist in Round 1
  • ATKV Musiq: Participant in Round 1
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Theory Merit
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Practical Merit
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Theory Distinction
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 5 Practical Distinction
  • TCL Rock School and Rock & Pop Grade 7 Practical Distinction
  • TCL Rock School and Rock & Pop Grade 8 Practical Merit

Half Colours

  • Participation as soloist in Concerto Festivals with either the Johannesburg Symphony Orchestra, the Randburg Symphony Orchestra or an equivalent orchestra
  • Philip Moore Music Competition: Second Prize
  • ARTSCAPE Competition: Finalist in Round 2
  • ATKV Musiq: Participant in Round 2
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Practical Distinction
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 7 Practical
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 6 Theory Distinction
  • Representing the St Mary’s DSG Orchestra, St Mary’s Singers or the Chapel Choir for 3 years from Grade 10
  • ATKV Applous Choir Competition National Participation, or other national competition
  • ATKV Applous Choir Competition Category Winners
  • TCL Rock School and Rock & Pop Grade 8 Practical Distinction

Full Colours

  • Philip Moore or any other recognised National / Regional  Music Competition: First Prize
  • Hugo Lambrechts Music Festival: Invitation to participate as soloist
  • ARTSCAPE Competition: Finalist in Round 3 and/or Category Runner-up
  • ATKV Musiq: Participant in Round 3
  • Sinfonia Juventi Youth Orchestra
  • ATKV Applous Choir Competition: overall winners
  • UNISA Roll of Honour / High Scorers Concert of any of the three examination boards’ Grade 6 Practical
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 7 Practical Merit
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 8 Practical

Honours

  • ARTSCAPE Competition: Finalist in Final Round and/ Category Winner
  • ATKV Musiq: Category Winner
  • National Youth Symphony Orchestra
  • National Youth Choir
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 7 Practical Distinction
  • UNISA Roll of Honour / High Scorers’ Concert of any of the three examination boards’ Grade 7 Practical
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 7 Theory
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 8 Practical Merit

Marian Award

  • ATKV Musiq: Overall Winner
  • Other International representation in Instrumental or Vocal Field (Motivation to be supplied)
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 8 Practical Distinction or any level which exceeds the Honours criteria
  • ABRSM, UNISA or TCL Grade 8 Theory or any level which exceeds the Honours criteria
  • Invitation to take part in the UNISA Bursary Concert

Public Speaking  
Cultural Standard
  • Winner of Inter-House Public Speaking in each Grade, after consultation with the Inter-House Public Speaking Co-ordinator
  • Group members who obtain an A+ at the Pretoria Public Speaking Festival
  • Individual Speakers (English/Afrikaans/Bilingual) who obtain an A+ at the Pretoria Public Speaking Festival
  • United Nations Debate – winner
Half Colours / Junior Award
  • Winner of Gauteng Regional Competition (Group/Individual)
  • Winner of any of the above (mentioned under Standards) for 2 years in a row
Full Colours
  • Winner of the National Competition (only individual speakers)

Honours

  • Winner of the International Competition (only individual speakers)
 Marian Award   A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

Drama For any girl from the school, who has a proven record of cultural or drama involvement at the school, participating in school productions, Eisteddfods or Trinity College examinations.

Cultural Standard:

Eisteddfods:

  • National Eisteddfod (Individual or Groups of up to 5 people):
    • Two or more Diplomas in two or more items.
    • Pretoria and Pierneef Theatre Eisteddfod: One A+ and one A++ category winner in two or more items; two or more A++ certificates in two or more items
    • Performance at the Tshwane leg of National Award Competition.
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Supporting Actress
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Actress in a cameo role
  • Inter-House Dance Competition: Best group performance

(The above awards will be subject to the standard of performance.)

Trinity College and LAMDA examinations: above 80%.

Special Cultural Standard

  • National Eisteddfod: Performance at Regional level.
  • Pretoria and Pierneef Theatre Eisteddfods: three or more category winner certificates
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best actress
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Actress in a male part
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Director(s) award in House Play Competition
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Choreographer (Physical Theatre)
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Artistic Director(s)
  • Inter-House Play Competition: Best Play Script
  • Inter-House Dance Competition: Best Choreographer
  • An acclaimed lead(s) in major school production.
 Outstanding Cultural Standard
  •  Superior level of performance in drama in one year not covered below and recommended by the Awards Committee or staff member.

Half Colours / Junior Award:

  • National Eisteddfod:  Performance at quarter finals.
  • Pretoria or Pierneef Theatre Eisteddfod: Floating Trophy – handed to the overall best performer in a grade for a specific section.
  • Acclaimed lead in major school production for two years.

Full Colours:

  • National Eisteddfod:  Performance at the semi-final.
  • Pretoria or Pierneef Theatre Eisteddfod: Floating Trophy – handed to the overall best performer in a grade for two specific sections.
  • In the opinion of the Awards Committee, any learner who has an approved record and displayed meritorious participation in Drama practices over a 3-year period.  (She has to apply for full colours in writing on a standardised application form).

Honours:

  • National Eisteddfod:  Performance at the final of the National Eisteddfod Academy Awards.
  • Pretoria or Pierneef Theatre Eisteddfod:  Floating Trophy – handed to the overall best performer in all sections.
  • In the opinion of the Awards Committee, any learner who has received Full Colours already, has an approved record and displayed outstanding participation in Drama practices over a 3-year period.  (She has to apply for Honours in writing on a standardised application form).
 Marian Award:  A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

 

Visual Art

 

Special Achievement Certificate

(Open to: Grade 8-12

Can be awarded to students NOT taking Art as a subject.)

  • High level of achievement in any of the following :
    Inter House Art Competition/ Inter House Art Activity / Eco Schools Art Drive/ Eco School Market
  • Design for: school based programmes, posters or other marketing campaigns in school.
  • Winner in any Inter House Art Competition or external Art Competition winner.

Cultural Standard

(Open to Grade 8-12 Art Students only)

  • Achievement of above 80% for a resolved practical Artwork/Body of artworks which have been externally moderated and exhibited.
  • Certificate of recognition from any National/International Art Competition.

Junior Award

(Open to Grade 8-9 Art Students only)
  • 4 x Cultural Standards (accumulated over the Grade 8 and 9 year).
Half Colours
  • 4x Cultural Standards or Junior Award plus 1 Cultural Standard

Colours and Honours to be developed

 

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Sport Awards The Awards Committee reserves the right to approve an award to an athlete, whose standard of play was of the highest quality for the school, but was left out of a provincial team by the specific Association, for various reasons.

The Awards Committee reserves the right to approve an award to an athlete, whose standard of play was of the highest quality for the school, but was left out of a provincial team by the specific Association, for various reasons.

Basketball

Basketball follows a Biannual programme as prescribed by the National Schools Basketball Federation and it consists of the following:

 

Year 1:       Individual Selections

1     Trials are held over a period of time where players are invited back to the next round of trials to select a District Team (D4)

2     The District (D4) team along with the other District teams attend Tshwane Games where a Regional team is selected. The Regional team then participate in the Gauteng Games. 

3     At the Gauteng games a team selected to represent Gauteng at the National games.

4     The maximum of 12 players per team is selected in any of the above tournaments. (U18 A, U17 A, U16 A, U15A & U14A)

5     At the National championships a South African team is selected.

 

Year 2:  Team Participation:

  1. A tournament is organised by District 4 office to determine the top teams in each age group.
  2. The winner of the District 4 games represents D4 at the Tshwane Games.
  3. The winner of the Tshwane Games will represent Tshwane Region at the Gauteng Games.
  4. The winner of the Gauteng Championships will represent Gauteng at the National Championships in their respective age groups.
  5. The maximum of 12 players per team is selected in any of the above tournaments. (U18 A, U17 A, U16 A, U15A & U14A)

Special Achievement Certificate

  1. Awarded to players who win other leagues than the A-league (i.e. the U16 B or U14 B-league)
  2. Awarded to players who are selected for D4
Sport Standard: 1
  1. Awarded to players who are selected for All Stars at the Pretoria Schools Basketball League.
  2. Awarded to players of a team who have achieved first place in the Pretoria Schools Basketball League in the U14 – Open age group and has played in 75% of the matches.
Special Sport Standard: 2
  1. Awarded to players who have been selected as the MVP in the Pretoria Schools Basketball League.
  2. Awarded to a St Mary’s DSG U16 or Open team that has won at the Gauteng Championships.
  3. Awarded to players who have been selected as an ALL STAR at the National Championships.
Outstanding Sport Standard: 3
  1. Awarded to players who have been selected as MVP at the SA Championships.

[Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.]

Junior Award
  1. Awarded to a pupil in the U14 or U15 age group who performs at a level whereby she would be regarded as a leading member of the under-age 'A' team in the strongest schools in the province (Tshwane or Gauteng), or who represents the under-age  Provincial 'A' team (Tshwane or Gauteng).
  2. Awarded to a St Mary’s DSG team that has won the Gauteng U14 or U15 Team Championships.
Half Colours

-       Selected for the Tshwane Region U16 - U18 team

-       Playing for the Open ‘A’ team for two years running.

-       Awarded to a St Mary’s DSG player who has won the Gauteng U16 or U18 Team Championships.

Full Colours

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows

i)     Playing for the Tshwane ‘A’ or Gauteng 'A' team at senior schools level (U16/Open).

Sports Excellence
  1. Awarded and displayed by players who

i)             Have been selected for a South African Training Squad

ii)            Have been selected for a South African Team but did not participate in an official match.

Honours
Awarded and displayed upon representing a National 'A' team.
 Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

   
Equestrian
Sport Standard

A rider is eligible for a sports standard if they have been selected for, and participate in:

1.    Being placed 1st in a SANESA qualifier in any discipline, excluding level 0 and 1 in all disciplines. (There must be a minimum of 3 competitors).

2.    The Gauteng North A or B Team for the SANESA Schools League national competition in the following disciplines and at the following levels:

      o Dressage Level 2 (Jnr Novice)

      o Show jumping Level 2/3 (80/90cms)

      o Equitation Level 4 (90cms)

o   Prix Caprilli Level 3/5 (Novice & Intermediate)

o   Eventing Level 3 (80cms)

3.    A rider who has been selected as a ‘reserve’ rider for Gauteng North, but does not compete.

4.    The equestrian team winning their SANESA Category.

[Four standards will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.] 

Half Colours

A rider is eligible for half colours if they have been selected for, and participate in:

The Gauteng North A or B Team for the SANESA Schools League provincial competition in the following disciplines and at the following levels:

o Dressage Level 3 (Jnr Elementary)

o Show jumping Level 4/5 (100/110cms)

o Equitation Level 6 (100cms)

o  Prix Caprilli Level 5 (Intermediate)

o  Eventing Level 5 (80cms)

(If the rider is unable to compete due to their horse’s lameness, illness or death, a vet certificate needs to be submitted to ensure the rider may still receive the award.)
Full Colours

A rider is eligible for full colours if they have been selected for, and participate in:

The Gauteng North A or B Team for the SANESA Schools League provincial competition in the following disciplines and at the following levels:

o Dressage Level 5/6/7 (SAEA Elementary Medium/Medium/Advanced Tests)

o Show jumping Level 6/7 (120/130cms)

o Eventing Level 6/7 (90cms/100cms) (SAEA Novice Test)

o Equitation Level 7 (110cms) (SAEA Open test)

(If the rider is unable to compete due to their horse’s lameness, illness or death, a vet certificate needs to be submitted to ensure the rider may still receive the award.)

Sports Excellence

The rider must have been awarded South African National Colours by the SAEF and is unable to compete in the competition i.e. is a reserve in the team.

Honours

The rider must have been selected to represent Gauteng at the SANESA National Championships at the following levels:

o Dressage Level 6/7 (Jnr Medium /Jnr Advanced)

o Show jumping Level 6/7 (120/130cms)

o Eventing Level 6/7 (90cms/100cms)

o Equitation Level 7 (110cms) 

For all other disciplines not mentioned above; rider will need to be competing at the highest level/Level 7.

South African National Colours

The rider must have been awarded South African National Colours by the SAEF and needs to compete in the international event.

 Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

   
Hockey

The following route is followed by Hockey to select their teams:
1 School teams are invited to trials whereafter individual players are invited back to the next set of trials on a weekly basis over a period of a month.
2 The Northern Gauteng Hockey teams are selected from the preceding trials.
3 U18 A & B team participate at IPT and the C & D teams participate at Regional Tournament
4 U16 & U15 A & B teams participate at IPT and the C & D teams participate at Regional Tournament
5 U14 A, B, C & D teams are selected
6 A maximum of 16 players per team is selected.
7 No Gauteng Hockey team is selected.
8 The South African Team is selected at the Inter Provincial Tournament. (IPT)

Junior Awards Awarded to a pupil who represents the Province in the U14A or U15A team.
1st team uniform Awarded and worn as soon as selected for 3 matches for the 1st team (it is retained, even if the player is dropped after 3 matches).
Special Achievement Certificates

Awarded to players who win other leagues than the A-league (i.e. the U16 B or U14 B-league).

Sport Standard 1

Awarded if the team wins the “A” league and the player has played in 75% of the matches

  1. Awarded to players who represent Northern Gauteng  “C & D” teams
  2. Awarded to players of an A team which has achieved second place in the ‘A’  league and the player has played in 75% of the matches
[Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.]

Special Sport Standard 2
  1. Awarded to players of an A team who have achieved first place in the ‘A’ league team matches and the player has played in 75% of the matches.
Outstanding Sport Standard 3 
  1. Awarded to A team players who have made it to the second round of ‘Stadsbeker’ league playoffs and the player has played in 75% of the matches.
 Half Colours

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows:

  1. Playing for the Open ‘A’ team 3 years running
  2. Playing for the Northern Gauteng B team
Full Colours

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows

  1. Playing for the Northern Gauteng 'A' team at senior schools level (U16/Open)
Sports Excellence 

Awarded and displayed by players who

  1. Have been selected for a South African Training Squad
  2. Have been selected for a South African Team but did not participate in an official match.
Honours 

Awarded and displayed upon representing a National 'A' team

 Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

   
Netball


Route for trials:

  1. Trials are held over a period of time where players are invited back to the next round of trials to select a District Team (D4)
  2. The District (D4) team along with the other District teams attend a final round of trials. At these trials the final names are selected to represent the Tshwane team at Gauteng trials. This is equivalent to Northern Gauteng or Tshwane team.
  3. At the Gauteng trials several rounds are played and a selection of the Gauteng team is made. It is this team that represents the province at the national championships in a specific age-group.
  4. The maximum of 12 players per team is selected in any of the above tournaments. (U18 A & B, U17 A, U16 A, U15A & U14A)
  5. At the National championships a South African team is selected.

Special Achievement

Award
  1. Awarded to players who win other leagues than the A-league (i.e. the U16 B or U14 B-league)
  2. Awarded to players of and age-group “A” team who achieve a 3rd or 4th position in their D13 league pool.
  3. Awarded to players of the U19 “B” team who finish 2nd in their D13 league pool 
Sport Standard: 1
  1. Awarded to a player from any age group who was selected for and represents the school at the second round of district trials.
  2. Awarded to players of an age group “A” team who has achieved second place in their D13 league pool and the player has played in 75% of the matches
  3. Awarded to players of the U19 “B” team who finish first in the D13 league pool.

[Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.]

Special Sport

Standard: 2
  1. Awarded to players of the U14 – U19 “A” team who have achieved first place in D13 League pool and the player has played in 75% of the matches.
  2. Awarded to players of the U19 “B” team who have achieved an overall top three finish in the D13 league.
Outstanding Sport Standard: 3 
  1. Awarded to players of the U14 – U19 “A” team which has played in the finals of the D13 district playoffs and the player has played in 75% of the matches.
Half Colours 
  1. Playing for the U19 ‘A’ team for three years
  2. Awarded to a pupil in the U16, U17, U18 age group who is selected for the final district team and represents this team at Gauteng trials.
Junior Award
  1. Awarded to a pupil in the U14 or U15 age group who is selected for the second round of Gauteng trials.

Full colours

 

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows

  1. Selected for the second of Gauteng trials (U16, U17, U18)
Sports Excellence

Awarded and displayed by players who

  1. Have been selected for a South African Training Squad
  2. Have been selected for a South African Team but did not participate in an official match.
Honours Awarded and displayed upon representing a National 'A' team. 
 Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

   
Squash


Route followed for Squash trials:

  1. Players participate in the Northern Gauteng Closed and Open Championships where they are ranked according to strength.
  2. Players are required to enter a specific number of graded tournaments where they are ranked according to strength.
  3. The Northern Gauteng team is then selected according to the Northern Gauteng and SA ranking of the player.
  4. Teams are selected for the U14, U16 and U19 age groups. An A and B-team is selected in each age group and each team consist of 5 players and 1 reserve. All players plus the reserve play in the IPT.
  5. The players participate in the Inter Provincial Tournament where they can be selected for the SA Team.
Junior Awards
Awarded to a pupil in an age-group other than the U16A/U19A who performs at a level whereby she would be regarded as a leading member of the under-age 'A' team in the strongest schools in the Province, or who represents the under-age Provincial 'A' team.
1st team uniform Awarded and worn as soon as selected for 3 matches for the 1st team (it is retained, even if the player is dropped after 3 matches). 
Special Achievement Certificates 

Awarded to players who won other leagues than the A and B-league (i.e. the C, D, E, F league). The league is not played in age groups but according to strength. 

Sport Standard 1  Awarded to players who won the B-league and the player has played in 75% of the matches. A-Teams from other schools enter into the B-league. 

Special Sport Standard:  2 

Awarded if the team wins the “A” league and the player has played in 75% of the matches

[Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.]

Half Colours 

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows:

  1. Playing for the Open ‘A’ team 3 years running
  2. Playing for the Provincial B team 
Full Colours

Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows:

  1. the Northern Gauteng 'A' team at senior schools level (U16 / U19) 
Sports Excellence 

Awarded and displayed by the following:

  1. The top 10 ranked squash players in each age group receive a SA Ranking certificate indicating that they are part of the SA Team but they do not participate in any matches.
  2. Players who have been selected for a South African Training Squad
  3. Players who have been selected for a South African Team but did not participate in an official match.  
Honours 
Awarded and displayed upon representing a National 'A' team. 
 Marian Award

A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

   

Swimming

Junior Awards

Awarded for the following:

i)             Awarded to a pupil in an age-group other than the U/16-U/18 who qualified for SA Senior National Championships and/or SA Youth National Championship.

i)             Awarded to a pupil in an age-group other than the U/16-U/18 who has been selected for Gauteng Team (SA Junior Nationals; SA School Championships; SA Youth National Championships).

Northern Tigers Swimming selects a junior team for interprovincial once-off competitions against other provinces throughout the season

Swimmers 19 and under, who have achieved one SA National qualifying standard will be considered a SA Elite Youth Qualifier, for results purposes.

Special Achievement Certificates 

Awarded for the following:

i)  Winning a silver or bronze medal at Inter-High A-Gala.

ii) Winning a gold medal at the Inter-High B/C-Gala.

Sport Standard 1 

Awarded as follows:

i)             Winning the Inter-High C-Gala.

ii)            Winning a gold medal at Inter-High A-Gala (One Sport Standard for each Gold Medal)

iii)           Qualified for a NTS Age Group Level 2 time.

iv)           Winning the  Victrix Ludorum at Inter-House Gala

[Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.]

Special Sport Standard 2:  

Awarded as follows:

i) Winning the Inter-High B-Gala

ii) Qualified for a NTS Age group Level 3 time

Outstanding Sport Standard 3:  

Awarded as follows:

i) Winning the Victrix Ludorm at Inter-High B Gala

ii) Winning the Inter-High A-Gala a

Half Colours 

Awarded as follows:

i) Representing St Mary’s DSG at Inter-High A-Gala for 3 years.

ii) Selected for Gauteng Team (SA Junior Nationals; SA School Championships; SA Youth National Championships).

Full Colours 

Awarded as follows:

i) Qualified for a SA Junior National Age Group time (SANJ).

ii) Winning the Victrix Ludorm at Inter-High A-Gala

Sports Excellence 

Awarded as follows:

Awarded and displayed upon representing a South African Team in an official Gala.

Honours 

Awarded as follows:

i) Qualified for SA Senior National Championships.

ii) Selected for SA Elite Youth Championships

iii) Selected for a South African Team but did not participate in an official Gala.

 Marian Award

Awarded as follows:

Winning a gold medal at SA Senior National Championships

CRITERIA FOR SWIMMING QUALIFYING TIMES FOR

SPORTS STANDARD

National age-group level 2 (ualifying Times)

 

U/14

U/15 & U/16

U/17& Open

50m Freestyle

33.74

32.58

N/A

100m Freestyle

1:17.49

1:14.76

N/A

200m Freestyle

2:48.03

2:42.11

N/A

50m Backstroke

41.12

39.70

N/A

100m Backstroke

1:28.19

1:25.15

N/A

200m Backstroke

3:09.72

3:03.18

N/A

50m Breaststroke

44:00

43.89

N/A

100m Breaststroke

1:39.31

1:35.89

N/A

200m Breaststroke

3:32.99

3:25.65

N/A

50m Butterfly

37.96

36.65

N/A

100m Butterfly

1:25.11

1:22.18

N/A

200m IM

3:13.37

3:06.70

N/A

National age-group level 3 (Qualifying Times)

 

U/14

U/15& U/16 & OPEN

50m Freestyle

N/A

N/A

100m Freestyle

1:09.03

1:07.12

200m Freestyle

2:30.28

2:25.55

400m Freestyle

5:16.67

5:06.70

50m Backstroke

N/A

N/A

100m Backstroke

1:19.07

1:16.63

200m Backstroke

2:50.09

2:44.86

50m Breaststroke

N/A

N/A

100m Breaststroke

1:29.04

1:26.30

200m Breaststroke

3:10.96

3:05.80

50m Butterfly

N/A

N/A

100m Butterfly

1:16.31

1:13.96

200m IM

2:52.03

2:46.70

SA Junior National Age Group Qualifying times

 

U/14

U/15

U/16

U/17 & OPEN

50m Freestyle

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

100m Freestyle

1:04.94

1:03.30

1:02.80

1:02.21

200m Freestyle

2:20.81

2:17.26

2:16.08

2:14.90

400m Freestyle

4:56.73

4:49.25

4:46.75

4:44.26

800m Freestyle

10:14.02

9:50.92

9:50.92

9:50.92

50m Backstroke

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

100m Backstroke

1:14.20

1:12.38

1:11.77

1:11.16

200m Backstroke

2:39.62

2:35.70

2:34.39

2:33.08

50m Breaststroke

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

100m Breaststroke

1:24.24

1:22.18

1:21.50

1:20.81

200m Breaststroke

3:00.67

2:56.27

2:54.80

2:53.33

50m Butterfly

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

100m Butterfly

1:12.20

1:10.44

1:09.85

1:09.26

200m Butterfly

2:37.74

2:33.45

2:33.45

2:33.45

200m IM

2:40.03

2:36.03

2:34.70

2:33.36

400m IM

5:38.10

5:26.83

5:26.83

5:26.83

SA Senior National Championship Qualifying times

 

WOMEN

50m Freestyle

27.54

100m Freestyle

59.48

200m Freestyle

2:08.98

400m Freestyle

4:31.79

800m Freestyle

9:20.09

1500m Freestyle

17:29.47

50m Backstroke

31.76

100m Backstroke

1:08.12

200m Backstroke

2:26.54

50m Breaststroke

35.11

100m Breaststroke

1:16.71

200m Breaststroke

2:44.52

50m Butterfly

29.32

100m Butterfly

1:05.74

200m Butterfly

2:24.42

200m IM

2:25.36

400m IM

5:07.11

SA Youth National Championship Qualifying times

 

WOMEN

50m Freestyle

28.48

100m Freestyle

1:02.97

200m Freestyle

2:14.90

400m Freestyle

4:44.26

800m Freestyle

9:45.78

1500m Freestyle

18:17.61

50m Backstroke

N/A

100m Backstroke

1:11.16

200m Backstroke

2:33.08

50m Breaststroke

N/A

100m Breaststroke

1:18.76

200m Breaststroke

2:48.92

50m Butterfly

N/A

100m Butterfly

1:08.68

200m Butterfly

2:30.87

200m IM

2:33.36

400m IM

5:24.01

Please note:

  1. The above times are long course times, 50m pool.
  2. Team swimmers must swim a qualifying time three times:  at the Inter-high A-Gala, and at two Official galas for instance the Gauteng High Schools Trials, where electronic times are taken or swim the qualifying time once and participate at the relevant level gala.

Tennis 


 The following route is used by Tennis to select their teams:

  1. Players participate in the Northern Gauteng Championships where they are ranked according to strength.
  2. Players enter and participate in several other graded tournaments where they are ranked according to the SA ranking list. They receive SATA rankings.
  3. The players attend Northern Gauteng squad training sessions where after the team is selected according to Northern Gauteng and SATA rankings.
  4. Northern Gauteng selects an U19 and U15 A and B-team and each team consist of 6 players.
  5. The players participate in the Inter Provincial Tournament where they can be selected for the SA Team.
Junior Awards   Awarded to a pupil in an age-group other than the U16A / U19A who performs at a level whereby she would be regarded as a leading member of the under-age 'A' team in the strongest schools in the Province, or who represents the under-age Provincial 'A' team.
1st team uniform   Awarded and worn as soon as selected for 3 matches for the 1st team (it is retained, even if the player is dropped after 3 matches).
Special Achievement Certificates 

 Awarded if the U15 B-team wins the B-section of their league and the player has played in 75% of the matches.

Sport Standard 1 

 Awarded if the team wins the U15 “A” league and the player has played in 75% of the matches.

 Awarded if the Senior B-team wins the U19 “B” league (Grade 9 – 12) in Term 1 and the player has played in 75% of the matches.

 Awarded if the A and B team win the U19 combined A/B league (Grade 8 – 12) in Term 3 and the player has played in 75% of the matches.

Special Sport Standard 2 

 Awarded if the team wins the U18 “A” league and the player has played in 75% of the matches.
Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.  A girl gaining four standards in Grade 8 – 9 will receive a Junior Award.  One additional standard in Grades 10 to 12 will be sufficient to convert the Junior Award to Half-Colours.

Half Colours

 Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows:

i) Playing for the Open ‘A’ team in the A-section of the league for 3 years running, provided that the player has played in 75% of the league matches and attended at least 75% of the training sessions. Players are only eligible to play for the Open A team from Grade 9.
ii) Playing for the Provincial U16 / U19 B team

Full Colours 

 Awarded and displayed upon representing the school as follows:

i) Playing for the Northern Gauteng 'A' team at senior schools level (U16 / U19).
ii) Playing for the Open A team in the A-section of the league for 4 years running, provided that the player has played in 75% of the league matches and attended at least 75% of the training sessions. Players are only eligible to play for the Open A team from Grade 9

Sports Excellence

 Awarded and displayed by players who

i) Have been selected for a South African Training Squad.

ii) Have been selected for a South African team but did not participate in an official match.

 Honours  Awarded and displayed upon representing a National 'A' team.
 Marian Award
 A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.
   
   

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Academic Awards Academic Standards

 

Awarded to a girl who receives

  • a top 100 placing in a nationally-recognised Olympiad
  • a top 3 placing in the Regional Science Expo
  • 80% in the DELF level A2 or 75% in the DELF level B1
  • 80% Average over the two examinations in Grade 8
  • 80% Average over the two examinations in Grade 9
  • 75% (525) in an exam in Grade 10
  • 70% (490) in an exam in Grade 11
  • 80% in DELF level A2 or 75% in DELF level B1

 Four standards – one of which must be earned in Grade 10 to 12 - will entitle a pupil to half-colours.

 

Junior Awards

Awarded to a pupil at the end of Grade 9 who achieves an average of 80% over the four examinations in Grade 8 and 9 (with a sub-minimum of 78% in each).

Awarded to a top 3 placing in the National Science Expo


Half Colours

Awarded to a pupil at the end of Grade 10 or 11, or in September of the Grade 12 year who achieves the following:

  • Pupils in Grade 10 – an average of 75% (525/700) over the two examinations in Grade 10 (with a sub-minimum of 73% in each)
  • Pupils in Grade 11 – an average of 70% (490/700) over the two examinations in Grade 11(with a sub-minimum of 68% in each)
  • Pupils in Grade 12 – an average of 70% (490/700) in the Mock Matric examination.
Full Colours
  • Awarded to a pupil at the end of Grade 11 if she has scored an average of 75 %( 525/700) over the two consecutive examinations in Grade 11.  (Sub-minimum 73%).
  • Awarded to a pupil in Grade 12 if she has scored an average of       75 % (525/700) in the Mock Matric examination.
Honours
  • Awarded to a pupil who scores an average of 80% (560/700) over two consecutive examinations in Grade 11. (Sub-minimum 78%).
  • Awarded to a pupil in Grade 12 who has scored an average of 80% (560/700) in the Mock Matric examination.
 Marian Award

 A Marian Award is the highest award at the school and will be decided by the Awards Committee.

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Policy: Extra-Mural Theory Lessons It is the aim of the Music Department at St Mary’s DSG to enable every Music pupil to attain a standard in Music Theory equivalent to that of the ABRSM Grade 5.  Once this has been achieved a Music pupil would not only possess a sound theoretical knowledge of Music, but will also be able to enter for Practical Examinations up to Grade 8 as this is the minimum theoretical requirement of ABRSM for Practical grades 6 and higher. Extra-mural Group Theory Lessons are therefore compulsory for all Music pupils.  However, there are few instances where pupils are exempt from taking these classes:

  1. Subject Music Pupils.
  2. Girls who can provide written proof that they are taking lessons outside of school and can provide the DSG Music Department with the name and number of their teacher outside of school.
  3. Girls who have already completed a Grade 5 Theory Examination through UNISA, ABRSM or TCL and can present a certificate to substantiate this achievement.
  4. Girls who are in Grade 12 in school.

School Grade 1 pupils. (Theory lessons only start in Grade 2 of school.)

  • Most pupils taking guitar and drum lessons normally only start lessons in Senior School, and are therefore only required to complete Music Theory Examinations up to a Grade 3 level.  They still maintain the option to carry on with Music Theory, should they wish to do so.
  • Pupils are enrolled for the relevant Royal Schools of Music Examination, Trinity College of London and UNISA examinations.  However, all pupils (except those who qualify for exemption) are required to write the Internal Theory Examination in October/November of each year, as this will form part of their Theory mark for Term 3.
  • As with practical lessons, a full term’s notice in writing is required at termination of lessons.
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Policy: Extra-Mural Theory Lessons It is the aim of the Music Department at St Mary’s DSG to enable every Music pupil to attain a standard in Music Theory equivalent to that of the ABRSM Grade 5.  Once this has been achieved a Music pupil would not only possess a sound theoretical knowledge of Music, but will also be able to enter for Practical Examinations up to Grade 8 as this is the minimum theoretical requirement of ABRSM for Practical grades 6 and higher. Extra-mural Group Theory Lessons are therefore compulsory for all Music pupils.  However, there are few instances where pupils are exempt from taking these classes:

  1. Subject Music Pupils.
  2. Girls who can provide written proof that they are taking lessons outside of school and can provide the DSG Music Department with the name and number of their teacher outside of school.
  3. Girls who have already completed a Grade 5 Theory Examination through UNISA, ABRSM or TCL and can present a certificate to substantiate this achievement.
  4. Girls who are in Grade 12 in school.

School Grade 1 pupils. (Theory lessons only start in Grade 2 of school.)

  • Most pupils taking guitar and drum lessons normally only start lessons in Senior School, and are therefore only required to complete Music Theory Examinations up to a Grade 3 level.  They still maintain the option to carry on with Music Theory, should they wish to do so.
  • Pupils are enrolled for the relevant Royal Schools of Music Examination, Trinity College of London and UNISA examinations.  However, all pupils (except those who qualify for exemption) are required to write the Internal Theory Examination in October/November of each year, as this will form part of their Theory mark for Term 3.
  • As with practical lessons, a full term’s notice in writing is required at termination of lessons.
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St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 11 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 11 - 10 April 2014 - (2.54 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=96106 St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 10
St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 10 - 17 March 2014 - (16 MB)

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Weekend Exeats and Visitors Boarders may go home every weekend if they so choose, except for the 1st weekend of the 1st term which is a closed weekend for all boarders.

Boarders may go home on Friday after their afternoon commitments and should be back in boarding by Sunday evening 19:00.

Exeat Requests

The Director of Boarding deals directly with requests for exeats from boarding.   If the request also involves missing school time, a separate request to be absent from school is to be made directly to the Deputy Principal, Mrs Miller, via the main reception.

Exeats with Parents during the Week

St Mary’s DSG Boarding recognizes the right of access by parents to their child at any time.   Prior notification by parents would be appreciated, giving the boarding staff plenty of time to check school commitments or activities.   Boarders are to ensure that their prep commitments are met before taking exeats during the week.   Return times for outings with parents during the school week is 21:00.  The right to access by parents can be further qualified to extend to Grandparents and older brothers or sisters.   Special negotiation for an extension beyond these immediate relatives could be to an aunt or uncle, a special family friend or neighbor.   The latter is specifically designed to accommodate long distance boarders who have little opportunity of connection with family or friends.

Approved Host and Visitors List

At the beginning of each year, all parents are requested to supply a fully completed and signed Approved Hosts and Visitors List.  When nominating persons on your daughter’s visiting/leave lists, it will be assumed that no further permission will be sought from you when these people visit or request leave for our daughter.  (If you wish to be notified, please do not enter names on the list).  With the exception of siblings, people under 21 years of age cannot be placed on the overnight/weekend/afternoon/tea leave list or sign out or collect girls.  Students may only visit, or receive visits from, people on this approved list.  Students will only be permitted overnight and weekend leave into the care of a person who has the maturity of years (i.e. wisdom and experience) like that of a parent.

Visitors

Flexibility in times is acceptable with visits from family members.  In the case of visits from friends, visits are generally permitted during the week between 15:00 and 17:00 for a maximum period of one hour.  Boarders must introduce their visitors to the staff members on duty, in the office, on their arrival and report again when the visitor is leaving.  The area to meet visitors is on the front lawn area.  Boarders must be visible at all times.  Public displays of affection are inappropriate at the school.

Responsibility for boarders on leave

In authorizing persons as approved Hosts, parents acknowledge that the responsibility for supervision and care of the boarder while on exeat from the boarding house is transferred from the Boarding House to the approved Host.  Persons taking on the role as host for boarders need to be made aware by parents of their responsibilities.  Parents approving of their daughters visiting homes of Approved Hosts are to confirm their confidence in the suitability of the carer, both morally and legally by making direct contact with the proposed hosts, thus assuring themselves that their daughters are in suitable care.

End of Term Exeats

The School does not support early departure at the end of term.  A boarders’ early departure will not be approved except in an emergency.  Please apply to the Deputy Head of School in advance if possible.  Repeated early departures will be referred to the Head of School.

Weekend Exeats are arranged as follows:

·         Requests are to be submitted weekly to the Boarding office on a Pink Exeat form (whether going out or staying in) no later than Wednesday 21:00.

·         The Director of Boarding processes and checks permissions.   Outstanding permissions are to be emailed, faxed or sms’ed to the Boarding Manager before Friday morning 09:00.

·         No boarder may leave until her weekend exeat has been granted.

·         All those collecting boarders are to announce themselves to the boarding office prior to pick up and sign the girl out.  Please take a Host Slip with you for her return.

·         Departure and arrival times for normal exeats are:  Departure Friday between 14:00 and 20:00, Saturday after 10:00.  Arrival Saturday between 09:00 and 20:00 and Sunday between 10:00 an 19:00.

Shopping

·         Boarders may go shopping Monday to Friday between 14:00 and 17:00 provided that they have no afternoon commitments and over the weekend throughout the day.

·         Boarders are expected to wear full school uniform during the week on outings.  Over weekends the girls may wear civvies, but must ensure that they are clean and neat, in good repair and worn with modesty.

·         Boarders may only go to the Hillcrest Boulevard for the maximum time allowed below:

o   Grade 12         a total of 3 hours a week        (Monday to Thursday)

o   Grade 11         a total of 2½ hours a week     (Monday to Thursday)

o   Grade 10         a total of 2 hours a week        (Monday to Thursday)

o   Grade 9           a total of 1½ hours a week     (Monday to Thursday)

o   Grade 8           a total of 1 hour a week         (Monday to Thursday)

·         Grade 8 boarders must be in a group of at least three boarders.  Grade 9 – 12 boarders must be at least two boarders.

·         Boarders exceeding their allowed time will not be allowed out the following one week (Monday to Sunday – if staying in – no outings) and will receive a demerit.

Weekday Exeats with Parents

If a parent comes and takes a Boarder out during the week, extra time will be allowed.  However, the parent must accompany the boarder to the office when signing out.

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Sample Daily Routine Weekdays                                                  

06:00               Wake-up                              

06:30 – 07:20  SAN

06:15 – 06:50  Breakfast                                                

07:15               Boarders leave for school                                              

07:25               Line up and Registration

07:30 – 13:35  School

10:55 – 11:25  School break time

13:35 – 14:10  Lunch

14:00 – 14:30  SAN

14:10 – 17:50  Prep, afternoon activities, watch TV, relax, etc.

14:30 – 17:30  First Supervised Prep session

15:15 – 16:15  Afternoon juice / tea served in boarder courtyard

15:30 – 17:00  Laundry collection

16:00 – 19:00  SAN

18:00 – 18:20  Supper (Formal) – Session 1

18:30 – 18:50  Supper (Formal) – Session 2

19:00 – 20:00  Silence in Dormitories

18:45 – 21:00  Second supervised Prep session

19:15 – 20:00  Coffee break downstairs in the Refectory for everyone

20:30               The outside doors are locked, all boarders must be inside

21:15               All Boarders should be upstairs

21:00               Silence for Grade 8

21:30               Silence throughout the Boarding House (Grade 9 – 12)

21:15               Lights out for Grade 8s

21:45               Lights out for Grade 9s

22:30               Lights out for Grade 10s

22:45               Lights out for Grade 11s

23:00               Lights out for Grade 12s

Saturdays

08:20               Wake-up

08:30 – 09:30  Breakfast

13:00 – 14:00  Lunch

17:45 – 18:30  Supper

19:00               DVD’s or recreation

22:45               Prepare for bed

Sundays

09:20               Wake-up

09:30 – 10:30  Brunch Breakfast

11:00 – 15:00  Recreation

15:00 – 15:30  Afternoon Snack

17:45 – 18:30  Supper

19:15 – 20:00  Chapel

21:15               Silence (All bed times ¼ hr earlier

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Student Care

The spiritual well-being of all the boarders is of utmost importance.  The Boarding Manager, Nursing Sisters, Counsellors and Chaplain, as well as all members of the boarding staff, are only too pleased to talk to any boarder and / or their parents.

In times of personal need boarders are encouraged to contact any of the above for advice, support and encouragement.  The Counsellors, Chaplain and Nursing Sisters are directly accessible to students during the day and through the boarding staff at night and on weekends.

Parents who have particular concerns about their daughters can discuss these with the above staff at any time.  Counseling is available through the Director of Boarding, the Nursing Sisters or the Counselling Centre.

For girls to develop a sense of belonging, it is necessary for them to have shared experiences with other in the boarding house.  These experiences occur in both a structured environment and more importantly in the events of everyday boarding life.  It is for this very reason that it is important for girls to spend time in the Boarding House relating to others rather than taking exeats at every available time or be away in their cubicle playing on a computer.  Activities are regularly planned on weekends and social activities are also regularly conducted with the boys’ schools.

While we do not expect all boarders to be the best of friends, we expect everyone to show respect for others in all that they do and say.  Rules are necessary to make it possible for the Boarding House to run smoothly and to ensure that the lives of the girls will be happy and comfortable.

Dormitory Leaders, House Mistresses and the Director of Boarding will respond to and deal with unhealthy dormitory and boarding situations.  If the need arises, the Director of Boarding, Mrs Mbandlwa, and then the Head of School, Father Paterson, will become involved with individuals who are incapable of or unwilling to adhere to the boarding and school’s expectations mentioned above.

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Boarding Contact Details BOARDING CONTACT DETAILS AND OFFICE HOURS

 

Boarding House Postal Address:

St Mary’s DSG, Boarding House

P O Box 11379

Hatfield, Pretoria, 0028

 

Tel: 0027 (0)12 - 366 0509    Cell: 0027 (0)72 922 5488

Email:  boarding@stmarys.pta.school.za

 

Director: Boarding

Ms Pumla Mbandlwa

Tel: (w) 0027 (0)12 - 366 0511      Cell: 0027 (0)73 009 5397

Email:  pmbandlwa@stmarys.pta.school.za

 

Boarding Staff:

Nursing Sister  Sr Lizl  084 729 3767 lduplessis@stmarys.pta.school.za
Nursing Sister   Sr Annika  082 214 2470 ascholtz@stmarys.pta.school.za
       
       

House Mistress
House Mistress 

 Miss Witham
 Mrs P Pinker
 
072 431 2113
082 855 4568


dwitham@stmary.pta.school.za
ppinker@stmary.pta.school.za

House Mistress   Mrs Chantel Venter  072 464 7179 cventer@stmarys.pta.school.za
House Mistress   Mrs R Keys 074 147 2777 rkeys@stmarys.pta.school.za
Office Assistants   Miss L Jiyane  012 366 0567 ljiyane@stmarys.pta.school.za
   Mrs A Lotter  012 366 0509  alotter@stmarys.pta.school.za
Catering Manger   Miss Genis   012 366 0526 dgenis@stmarys.pta.school.za
       
Other Staff:      
Stooge   Miss Davies    
Stooge  Miss Snyman    
Stooge   Miss van Dou    
Stooge  Miss Marquardt    
Stooge   Miss Smith    
       
Chaplain   Fr Leonard   012 366 0500  lnyakale@stmarys.pta.school.za
School Shop   Mrs Lindeque  084 553 0720   shop@stmarys.pta.school.za

The boarding house is open from 07:00 – 21:30.  Director: Boarding is available from 07:00 – 16:00 and is then on call thereafter.

 

Other important email addresses

boardercouncil@stmarys.pta.school.za         Boarder Council

foodcouncil@stmarys.pta.school.za               Food Council

The Boarder Council is made up of two representatives from each grade.  The committee meets bi-termly with the Boarding Manager.  Any suggestions or complaints must be fed through to the grade representatives two days before the date on the calendar.

 

Who to see about?

General Boarding Issues  Ms Pumla Mbandlwa (Director: Boarding)
Theft   Boarding Office / House Mistress / Ms Pumla Mbandlwa
Repairs and Maintenance   House Mistress on Duty
Medical / Illness  Sister Lizl / Sister Annika
Recreational ideas  Stooges
Food  Food Council / Miss Genis (Catering Manager)
Bad Behaviour   Ms Pumla Mbandlwa  / House Mistress on duty
Hygene Issues   Sister Lizl / Sr Annika
Airport Transfer   Miss Jiyane (Boarding Assistant)
General Transport   Miss Jiyane / Ms Pumla Mbandlwa

 

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Communication Reports

Subject reports, supported by the Director of Boarding and staff, are an essential summary of the term.  These are available as per school calendar.

Social Events

We try and schedule one social event per term for boarder families.  Where possible, it is recommended that you attend.  These events are usually on the same day as a Parents / Teacher meeting, providing the opportunity for you to meet your daughter’s teachers and discuss her progress, as well as to meet her friends and their parents.

Cell Phones

Cell phones give opportunity for greater ease in communication.  Boarders may have their cell phones but conditions apply.  Should a boarder be found, not adhering to the rules applying to cell phones, it will be confiscated for a period of one week (SIM card included).

The security of the cell phone is the responsibility of the boarder.

Cell phones may be used during the following times:

Monday – Friday – after school until evening silence.   Not during school times, afternoon activities, prep, meal times etc.  On weekends boarders may use their cell phones throughout the day, except during meal times and after evening silence.

Boarders are required to inform the Boarding Office of the cell number, make and model of any mobile phone brought to the boarding house.   Airtime is available for purchase from the Boarding Office on a Debit Card System.

All new grade 08s may not make use of any telephones for the first two weeks of term.  This is to assist with the settling process and to encourage the girls to follow the correct channels.  Parents are more than welcome to call the Director of Boarding to enquire about their daughter’s well-being.

Email

All boarders have an email address and have Internet access through the School Network.  All Boarding Houses have wireless networks easily accessible to students as well as networked printers.  All boarders have access to computers for emailing.  Your daughters email address will be: initial surname@stmarys.pta.school.za;

eg Pumla Mbandlwa    -   pmbandlwa@stmarys.pta.school.za

 

Parent / School communications

Parents are always welcome to visit school, but should contact the office in advance to ensure that the boarder and any member(s) of staff the parents may wish to see are available.   If parents wish to see the Headmaster, Fr Paterson, they should make an appointment with his secretary, Mrs Pippa Marais.

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Living Away From Home Homesickness

It is not at all unusual during the early stages of a boarder’s stay to experience a degree of homesickness.  This is a perfectly natural response to the loss of security and emotional support that home life represents for most young people.   Parents also often experience emotional upset that results from the absence of their child.   As boarders develop friendships and become familiar with the surroundings and routine of boarding, this feeling of insecurity and emotional confusion passes.  In some cases it will recur, particularly if the student is worried or concerned about circumstances at home.

In the early stages of adjustment, keeping busy at school or sport, or at any of the activities that are on offer, can be helpful and boarders will be encouraged to become involved.   Parents who are concerned about their daughters are encouraged to make contact with the Boarding Manager.

In the early stages of settling in, parents are encouraged to limit contact with their child.  Surprisingly, contact with home can make matters more difficult for some girls.   They need to be reassured of parental love and support but excessive contact with home can often be counterproductive.  Therefore we encourage parents to:

·         Expect that homesickness is a passing phase of a girl’s adjustment to boarding life.

·         Make contact with the Boarding Manager if there are concerns.

·         Encourage your daughters to seek support from boarding staff.

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Mission Statement MISSION STATEMENT

Boarding at St Mary’s DSG provides a safe, caring atmosphere ideal for both intellectual and emotional growth.

The aim is to foster a lively, happy community which operates from a stable base where the feeling of belonging to a large family is important.  Boarders learn how to live, to work and to play in a community environment, sharing experiences with people of their own age who originate from many different countries and cultural backgrounds.

GENERAL OVERVIEW OF BOARDING LIFE

Boarding is an integral part of life at the school.  The boarding house is located on top of the main school building.  Boarders enjoy an excellent standard of accommodation, readily available educational and sporting facilities and the chance to enjoy all the opportunities of school life to the full.  Perhaps the most important of these opportunities is the time spent building friendships, which will hopefully endure throughout their time at the school and their lives beyond it.

Following are the nine principles upon which boarding at St Mary’s DSG is based.

  1. The development of the whole person and the communication of values are vital.
  2. Being an open and trusting school, boarding is based upon mutual respect for all its members.
  3. Each boarder has the right to be able to work, play and relax free from abuse, intimidation, harassment, teasing and bullying.
  4. There is equality of opportunity and respect for all boarders, regardless of ethnicity, culture, gender or disability.
  5. Each boarder and each member of staff is to be treated as an individual and with respect by other pupils and by staff.
  6. Although living together, staff and boarders acknowledge the right of each other to privacy.
  7. Each boarder has the right to extend her intellectual growth in an atmosphere of positive encouragement and in conditions that are conducive to learning.
  8. All boarders should be able to develop physically, spiritually, intellectual, morally and socially.
  9. Despite the distance separating boarders from their families, links with parents are seen as an indispensable part of the support and development of boarders.
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Welcome to St Mary's DSG Boarding

pumla2Welcome and thank you for choosing boarding at St Mary’s DSG.  We look forward to a long and happy association with you.  Good boarding schools are like extended families and enjoy very close connections with the boarders and their family relatives.  At St Mary’s DSG, we believe that boarding should complement, not replace family life.  Therefore, we are as friendly and approachable as we can be.  Our boarding environment contains a strong system of care.

The School has a long and proud tradition of boarding and we seek to uphold those values of respect, understanding, community, friendship, participation and balance.  Every boarder at St Mary’s DSG is regarded as an important individual who is supported and encouraged in her own efforts to achieve for full potential

We aim to make the girls feel comfortable about their boarding choice.  Boarding is a difficult step for many families, but it is important for you to know that we do understand most of the difficulties and the sense of loss in those initial weeks.  We are available to support your daughter throughout her stay in our care.

My approach is to be contactable at all times.  This includes my cell phone with me at all times, even next to my bed at night.  In case of an emergency, there is a house mistress on call overnight on each side of the boarding house and there is always a Nursing Sister on call.

Boarding develops many valuable life skills.  It encourages a sense of independence at it also enables girls to engage confidently with a very wide range of people.  Boarders make friends for life and they develop many wonderful personal attributes through community living.

Good, contemporary boarding schools such as St Mary’s DSG are judged by the strong and open relationship between boarders, staff and parents.  Our boarders are also encouraged to make decisions and to grow as confident, trusted and capable individuals.

Most importantly, Christian values underpin our boarding philosophy.  The welfare of our boarders is paramount and boarding staff liaise closely with the School Chaplain, School Counsellors, Nursing Sisters, Parents and, as appropriate, the Head and Deputy Heads of the School.

St Mary’s DSG is a happy, welcoming community and we have boarders from many parts of the country and Africa.  We also have boarders from as far as America.  This provides a culturally diverse mix and allows for girls to make friends with a wide range of people.

The value of a St Mary’s DSG boarding experience is that it encourages girls to make decisions and become confident, trusted, happy and capable young women.

Please remember, we are always available through email and on the other end of a phone.  These important phone numbers are listed on page 6 of this handbook.

Wishing you a very happy stay.

Ms Pumla Mbandlwa

Director of Boarding

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HOW TO GO ABOUT IT HOW TO GO ABOUT IT

Download the forms below, complete and fax to the Boarding office on: 086 624 0451 at least 24-48 hours before required date.

Boarding Application - (150KB)

Exeat Permission - ()

Visitors Permission - ()


 

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Staff Email Addresses Staff List 2018 - Term 3

Senior School - Academic

Name   

Title

E-mail Address

Paterson, Angus Fr

Head of School

frpaterson@stmarys.pta.school.za

Miller, Jomari Mrs

Vice-Principal Academics

jmiller@stmarys.pta.school.za

Neser, Marinda Mrs

Vice-Principal Student Affairs

mneser@stmarys.pta.school.za

Beukes, Tienie Mrs

Subject Head: History

tbeukes@stmarys.pta.school.za

Booysen, Martie Mrs

Teacher: Afrikaans

mbooysen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Botha, Isabel Miss

Subject Head: Science,

ibotha@stmarys.pta.school.za

Brown, Jacqueline Ms

Subject Head: Geography; Head of Grade 12

jbrown@stmarys.pta.school.za

de Villiers, Christa Mrs

Subject Head: Life Orientation; Career Counsellor

cdevilliers@stmarys.pta.school.za

Downard, Carinne Miss

Teacher: English

cdownard@stmarys.pta.school.za

Druce, Helen Mrs

Teacher: French

hdruce@stmarys.pta.school.za

Eiselen, Jane Mrs

Subject Head: Mathematics; Learning Area Head: Mathematics and Business Subjects

jeiselen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Erasmus, Surina Mrs

Subject Head: Business Studies

serasmus@stmarys.pta.school.za

Fineberg, Brenda Mrs

Subject Head: Life Sciences; Learning Area Head: Science & Technology;

Head of Grade 8

bfineberg@stmarys.pta.school.za

Grobler, Stefaan Mr

Teacher: Accounting

sgrobler@stmarys.pta.school.za

Govender, Sabashnee Mrs

Learning Technologies Facilitator

sgovender@stmarys.pta.school.za

Hans, Nozuko Mrs

Teacher: Life Sciences

nhans@stmarys.pta.school.za

Jenkins, Thea Mrs

Laboratory Technician

tjenkins@stmarys.pta.school.za

Jorissen, Margaretha Mrs

Teacher: Afrikaans

mjorissen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Kladis, Konstadina Mrs

Teacher: Mathematics

kkladis@stmarys.pta.school.za

Knight, Jane Mrs

Subject Head: Art; Learning Area Head: Art and Social Sciences

jknight@stmarys.pta.school.za

Knoetze, Louis Mr

Teacher: History and Life Orientation

lknoetze@stmarys.pta.school.za

Koppeschaar, Ingrid Ms

Teacher: Subject Music

ikoppeschaar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Labuschagne, Marika Mrs

Teacher: Science

mlabuschagne@stmarys.pta.school.za

Le Roux, Hannelie Mrs

Head of Department: Afrikaans

hleroux@stmarys.pta.school.za

Le Roux, Lizelle Mrs

Head of Mathematical Literacy

lleroux@stmarys.pta.school.za

Maruma, Cathrine Mrs

Laboratory Cleaner and Assistant

cmaruma@stmarys.pta.school.za

Msomi, Mdu Mr

Teacher: Zulu

mmsomi@stmarys.pta.school.za

Narsai, Rohini Mrs

Teacher: Mathematics; Head of Grade 9

rnarsai@stmarys.pta.school.za

Nel, Olga Mrs

Teacher: English

onel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Oosthuizen, Gillian Mrs

Teacher: English/ Drama

goosthuizen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Phahlane, Daisy Mrs

Teacher: Sepedi

dphahlane@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pieterse, Aurelia Miss

Teacher: Business Studies

apieterse@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pollard, Lizel Mrs

Subject Head: EMS and Accounting;

Head of Grade 11

lpollard@stmarys.pta.school.za

Potgieter, Christo Mr

Subject Head: Drama

cpotgieter@stmarys.pta.school.za

Rautenbach, Clara Ms

Teacher: Life Orientation; Hockey Organiser

crautenbach@stmarys.pta.school.za

Schoonraad, Inamari Ms

Drama Intern

ischoonraad@stmarys.pta.school.za

Singh, Youveshni Mrs

Subject Head: English; Learning Area  Head, Languages and LO

ysingh@stmarys.pta.school.za                 

Stedall, Carol Mrs

Subject Head: Consumer Studies and Technology; IEB Liaison

cstedall@stmarys.pta.school.za

Stone, Sharon Mrs

Teacher: Mathematics

sstone@stmarys.pta.school.za

van den Berg, Mandy Mrs

Teacher: Mathematics

avandenberg@stmarys.pta.school.za

van Rooyen-Enslin, Kona Mrs

Subject Head: French

kvanrooyen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Van Wyk, Tian Mr

Teacher: Life Science

tvwyk@stmarys.pta.school.za

Vonkeman, Inka Mrs

Teacher: English

ivonkeman@stmarys.pta.school.za

Vorster, Melinda Mrs

Teacher: Art and Technology

mvorster@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ward, Bronwyn Mrs

Teacher: Physical and Natural Science;

 Head of Grade 10

bward@stmarys.pta.school.za

Watson, Ashleigh Miss

Teacher: English and Life Orientation

awatson@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pastoral Care

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Nyakale, Leonard Fr

Chaplain

lnyakale@stmarys.pta.school.za

Marais, Riandie Mrs

Part-time Educational Psychologist

rmarais@stmarys.pta.school.za

King, Lesley Miss

Part-time Educational Psychologist

lking@stmarys.pta.school.za

Lowes,  Timothy Fr

Chaplain Assistant

tlowes@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pienaar, Marthé Mrs

Educational Psychologist

mpienaar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Junior School - Academic

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Johnstone, Gina Mrs

Junior School Principal

gjohnstone@stmarys.pta.school.za

Barnes, Elinore Mrs

Aftercare Assistant

elbarnes@stmarys.pta.school.za

Blake, Claire Mrs

Teacher: Grade 4

cblake@stmarys.pta.school.za

Brandt, Juliet, Mrs

Teacher: Grade 7 English & Geography

jbrandt@stmarys.pta.school.za

Calitz, Dale Mr

Teacher: Intersen Phase

dcalitz@stmarys.pta.school.za

Collins, Yolanda Mrs

Learning Support

ycollins@stmarys.pta.school.za

Dlamini, Wonder Mr

Teacher: Zulu

wdlamini@stmarys.pta.school.za

Dube, Lorraine Mrs

Aftercare Assistant

ldube@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ewart-Phipps, Therese Mrs

Head of Grade 4; Outreach Coordinator;

HOD LO; Head of Grade 4

tphipps@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ferreira, Christine Miss

Intern: Foundation Phase; Squash Organiser

squash@stmarys.pta.school.za

Frigyik, Kirsty Miss

Teacher: Foundation Phase

kfrigyik@stmarys.pta.school.za

Hussein, Melanie Mrs

Teacher: Grade 3

mhussein@stmarys.pta.school.za

Jacobs, Janine Ms

Teacher: PE

jjacobs@stmarys.pta.school.za

Joseph, Hildegard Mrs

HOD Music  & Culture

hjoseph@stmarys.pta.school.za

Kjonstad, Kristy Miss

Teacher: Grade 4

kkjonstad@stmarys.pta.school.za

Kriel, Carna Ms

Head of Intersen Phase, Teacher : Mathematics

ckriel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Maccombel, Elizabeth Miss

Aftercare Assistant

emaccombel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Makhafola, Idah Miss

Teacher: Sepedi

imakhafola@stmarys.pta.school.za

Makhene, Pearl Miss

Teacher: Intersen Phase

pmakhene@stmarys.pta.school.za

Manganye, Nomsa Mrs

Assistant Teacher: Grade 0

nmanganye2@stmarys.pta.school.za

Masengi, Neli Miss

Teacher: Sepedi & LO

nmasengi@stmarys.pta.school.za

Masimula, Doreen Mrs

Aftercare Supervisor

dmasimula@stmarys.pta.school.za

Matos, Karen Mrs

Teacher: Foundation Phase

kmatos@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mavukane, Hlamalani Miss

ISASA Intersen Phase Intern

hmavukane@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mkhabela, Tshwarelo Miss

ISASA Foundation Phase Intern

tmakhabela@stmarys.pta.school.za

Molver, Tarryn Mrs

Head of Grade 3

treinecke@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mtongana, Sipokazi Miss

Teacher: Intersen Phase

smtongana@stmarys.pta.school.za

Nagy, Justine Miss

Teacher: Intersen Phase

jnagy@stmarys.pta.school.za

Nel, Candace Mrs

Teacher: Intersen Phase

cnel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ntuli, Bathabile Mrs

ISASA Foundation Phase Intern & Stooge

bzwane@stmarys.pta.school.za

Page, Gwen Mrs

Teacher: Foundation Phase

gpage@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pienaar, Fiona Mrs

Head of Grade 0

fpienaar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Ranger, Megan Miss

Teacher: Intersen Phase

mranger@stmarys.pta.school.za

Rasmeni, Thelma Ms

Assistant Teacher: Grade 0

trasmeni@stmarys.pta.school.za

Scherag, Bernadette Miss

Teacher: Physical Education

bscherag@stmarys.pta.school.za

Sikhosana, Boipelo Mrs

Teacher : Art : Grade 6

bsikhosana@stmarys.pta.school.za

Tansell, Cathy Mrs

Teacher: Foundation Phase : IT

ctansell@stmarys.pta.school.za

Turvey, Nerine Mrs

Teacher: Foundation Phase

nturvey@stmarys.pta.school.za

Snyman, Karin Mrs

Afrikaans Teacher

ksnyman@stmarys.pta.school.za

Tefo, Lerato Miss

Teacher Assistant: Grade 0

ltefo@stmarys.pta.school.za

Underhay, Louise Mrs

Teacher: Foundation Phase

lunderhay@stmarys.pta.school.za

van der Merwe, Janenne Mrs

Teacher: Afrikaans (Grade 3,5-6); Head of Languages;

Head of 1st Additional Languages

jvandermerwe@stmarys.pta.school.za

van der Walt, Sophia Mrs

Afrikaans and History Teacher

svanderwalt@stmarys.pta.school.za

Van Staden, Jennifer Mrs

Teacher: English and History; Head of Grade 5

jvanstaden@stmarys.pta.school.za

Van Wyk, Astrid Mrs

Teacher: IT Intersen Phase

avanwyk@stmarys.pta.school.za

Wentzel, Jaime-Lee Miss

Locum Teacher

jwentzel@stmarys.pta.school.za

Whitelaw, Louise Mrs

Head of Academics, Teacher: Mathematics

lwhitelaw@stmarys.pta.school.za

Wöcke, Gillian Mrs

Head of DARE/Learner Support

gwocke@stmarys.pta.school.za

Knowledge Centre & IT

Name

Title

E-mail Address      

Bothma, Lizelle Ms

IT Manager, Subject Head: Information Technology

lbothma@stmarys.pta.school.za

Jadrijevic, Fiona Mrs

Information and Innovation Hub Facilitator

fjadrijevic@stmarys.pta.school.za

Motaung, Lucy Miss

Information and Innovation Hub Assistant

lmotaung@stmarys.pta.school.za

Viljoen, Chris Mr

IT Technician

chris@stmarys.pta.school.za

Welman, Marina Ms

IT Technician

marina@stmarys.pta.school.za

Sport

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Vos du Toit, Melinda Mrs

Director of Sport

mvosdutoit@stmarys.pta.school.za

Botha, Carli Miss

Swimming and Netball Organiser

cbotha@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mothiba, Neo Mr

Head of Junior School PE and Basketball Coordinator

nkmothiba@stmarys.pta.school.za

Myburgh, Wikus Mr

Head of Tennis

tennis@stmarys.pta.school.za

Malan, Isabel Miss

Sport Intern

imalan@stmarys.pta.school.za

Finance, HR and Marketing

Name

Title

E-mail Address

van der Westhuizen, Karen Mrs

Business Manager

kvanderwesthuizen@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mahlungu, Olga Miss

Deputy Bursar

bursar.assistant@stmarys.pta.school.za

Calitz, Sarnel Mrs

Deputy Bursar

deputybursar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Broughton, Deanne Mrs

Marketing Manager

deanne@stmarys.pta.school.za

Cockrell, Gerda Mrs

Debtors Clerk : Junior School

debtorsjnr@stmarys.pta.school.za

De Jong, Charmaine Mrs

HR Manager

hrdsg@stmarys.pta.school.za

Victor, Caroline Mrs

HR Manager

hrdsg@stmarys.pta.school.za

Long, Elly Mrs

Bookkeeper/Creditors Clerk

elong@stmarys.pta.school.za

Pretorius, Erika Mrs

Bookkeeper/Creditors Clerk

creditors@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mabulu, Zanele Miss

Debtors Clerk : Senior School

debtorssnr@stmarys.pta.school.za

 

Music

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Burger, Celia Mrs

Director of Music

ceburger@stmarys.pta.school.za

Botes, Jannien Ms

Music Teacher: Piano

 

Burdukova-Kemp, Polina Ms

Music Teacher: Cello

 

Coetzee, Mardonét Ms

Music Teacher: Music Theory

 

de Villiers, Helena Mrs

Accompaniment: Piano

 

Erwee, Elri Miss

Music Teacher: Voice

 

Kemp,Rina Mrs

Music Teacher: Piano

 

Koppeschaar, Ingrid Ms

Teacher: Subject Music

ikoppeschaar@stmarys.pta.school.za

Kriegler, Cecilia Mrs

Music Teacher: Violin/ Double Bass

 

Nel, Simone Ms

Music Teacher: Clarinet/Saxophone

 

Nel, Chrismari Ms

Music Teacher: Piano & Music Theory

 

Nöthling, Riana Ms

Music Teacher: Piano

 

Ndlovu, Mbuso Mr

Conductor:  Choir/Afrika Phenduka

 

Pieterse, Etienne Mr

Music Teacher: Guitar

 

Rabie, Nelmarie Mrs

Music Teacher: Voice

 

Rabie, Christiaan Mr

Music Teacher: Sound & Recording

 

Rossouw, JP Mr

Music Teacher: Jazz Guitar

 

Stimie, Irma Mrs

Music Teacher: Flute/Recorder

 

Swart, Riëtte Mrs

Music Teacher: Piano

 

Swart, Marguerite Ms

Music Teacher: Percussion

 

Tiran, Ilse Mrs

Music Teacher: Piano

 

Tolsma, Pierre Mr

Music Teacher: Flute

 

Wohlitz, Hester Mrs

Music Teacher: Violin/ Viola

 

Secretarial & Administrative Staff

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Boucher, Tarina Miss

Admin Assistant

tboucher@stmarys.pta.school.za

Hancock, Una Mrs

Performing Arts Administrator

uhancock@stmarys.pta.school.za

Maponya, Priscitta Ms

Reprographer

priscita@stmarys.pta.school.za

Jiyane, Lelo Miss

Boarding: Admin Assistant

ljiyankabele@stmarys.pta.school.za

Masunyane, Nono Ms

Senior School Admissions  Secretary

snradmissions@stmarys.pta.school.za

Marais, Pippa Mrs

Head’s PA

pmarais@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mndau, Celia Mrs

Junior School Assistant Secretary

cmndau@stmarys.pta.school.za

Roelofse, Retha Mrs

PA to the Junior School Principal

rroelofse@stmarys.pta.school.za

Sharp, Julianne Miss

Senior School Receptionist

reception@stmarys.pta.school.za

Boarding House

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Mbandlwa, Pumla Ms

Director: Boarding

pmbandlwa@stmarys.pta.shool.za

Davies, Andrea Miss

Annexe House Mistress

adavies@stmarys.pta.school.za

du Plessis, Lizl Sr

Nursing Sister

lduplessis@stmarys.pta.school.za

Breytenbach, Inge Mrs

Boarding House Mistress

ibreytenbach@stmarys.pta.school.za

Keys, Robyn Mrs

Boarding House Mistress

rkeys@stmarys.pta.school.za

Lötter, Annalie Mrs

Boarding Office Assistant

alotter@stmarys.pta.school.za

Marquardt, Kayla Miss

Stooge

kayla.marquardt@gmail.com

Pinker, Pippa Mrs

Boarding House Mistress

ppinker@stmarys.pta.school.za

Scholtz, Annika Mrs

Nursing Sister

ascholtz@stmarys.pta.school.za

Smith, Nadine Miss

Stooge

nadinesmith0@gmail.com

Snyman, Ciska Miss

Stooge

snymanciska@icloud.com

van Dou, Angelica  Miss

Stooge

avandou@stmarys.pta.school.za

Venter, Chantel Mrs

Boarding House Mistress

cventer@stmarys.pta.school.za

Witham, Dorothy Miss

Boarding House Mistress

dwitham@stmarys.pta.school.za

Drivers

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Maruma, Johannes Mr

Driver

jmaruma@stmarys.pta.school.za

Shika, Solly Mr

Driver

sshika@stmarys.pta.school.za

Catering

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Genis, Dalene Ms

Catering Manager

dgenis@stmarys.pta.school.za

Makuwa, Antonet Miss

Day Matron and Laundry Manager

laundry@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mazibuko, Eunice Mrs

Assistant Catering Manager

emazibuko@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mogorosi, Benedict Mr

Chef

bmogorosi@stmarys.pta.school.za

Mtshweni, Portia Miss

Laundry Supervisor

laundry@stmarys.pta.school.za

Nnawe, Lady Mrs

Assistant Catering Manager

lnnawe@stmarys.pta.school.za

Vorster, Nico Mr

Chef

nvorster@stmarys.pta.school.za

Estates

Name

Title

E-mail Address

de Beer, Roland Mr

Estates Manager

rdebeer@stmarys.pta.school.za

Maubane, Isaac Mr

Assistant Estates Manager

imaubane@stmarys.pta.school.za

Seanego, Isrom Mr

Security Supervisor

iseanego@stmarys.pta.co.za

Bokaba, Sam Mr

Assistant Supervisor (Security)

sbokaba@stmaryspta.co.za

 

Uniform Shop

Name

Title

E-mail Address

Lindeque, Henna Mrs

Uniform shop

hlindeque@stmarys.pta.school.za

 

 

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 14, Issue 9 St Mary's Matters Volume 14, Issue 9 - 19 February 2014 - (16 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=95366 Music St Mary’s DSG in Pretoria: a place filled with a rich music culture

2014

 

Music, as with all other disciplines at St Mary's Diocesan School for Girls (DSG) in Pretoria, has always formed an integral part of the cultivation and nurturing of each individual learner at the school.  Not only does music at DSG assist in creating and developing basic skills taught through practice and performance, but also creates opportunities that are akin to the increasing awareness of analytical-creative thinking, co-ordination, self-discipline, fine motor control, and numerous other principles associated with holistic education.  Coupled to the high standards in music tuition, both individually and in group context by well–trained teachers, music education at St Mary’s aspires to instil confidence, pride and commitment in our students through their respective musical endeavours. Additionally, we guide and mentor all those involved to find joy and fulfilment in the art of music.

The Music Department at St Mary’s DSG is housed in the Performing Arts Centre (PAC).  This facility is set apart from the main school buildings and provides an environment that is conducive to numerous cultural activities. It has its own beautiful Concert Hall with a sprung floor, large teaching rooms and twelve practice rooms that are available to all the learners involved in music at the school.  Here we offer a great variety of instrumental tuition, ranging from piano to guitar and from reeds and woodwinds to drums and percussions, as well as vocal training.  All these aspects are taught by highly-qualified and experienced teachers from the surrounding areas.

Our Extra-mural Programme offers a wide variety of musical instruction in practically every instrumental category, ranging from the traditional to orchestral and contemporary, as well as Music Theory lessons. Twenty-six staff members fulfil the task of teaching close to 300 students on a daily basis during and after school hours.

St Mary’s DSG is proud to have a young and vibrant chamber orchestra in which pupils from different levels of playing proficiency can participate in terms of group music performance.  They rehearse and perform under the accomplished baton of Mrs Celia Burger. These young musicians boast with a repertoire spanning different style periods and arrangements to suit the specific combination of instruments found in a typical school orchestra.  Our Music Department also creates a performing platform for smaller groups such as the budding string ensembles.

Phenduka is an African Music Club that was launched at the beginning of 2002.  The Music Department had been privileged to acquire the professional assistance of Mr Mbuso Ndlovu, a distinguished scholar in African music. The girls find this form of musical expression especially exciting, and one is continually astounded at their enthusiasm for this relatively-new art form, especially because it allows free reign for individual eurhythmics and vocal expression.

DSG’s choral tradition is faithfully upheld and driven by no less than three choirs: the Junior School Choir, the St Mary’s Singers, and the Chapel Choir.  Our choirs regularly tour both nationally and internationally.  In August 2004 a combined choir was invited to participate in the 20th Zimriya World Assembly of Choirs in Israel.  The St Mary’s Singers, under the leadership of Mr Christo Burger, have also had successful tours to the USA, Thailand, and Singapore. 

The Chapel Choir, conducted by Mr Mbuso Ndlovu, which mainly consists of the boarders of the school, primarily sings during the Divine Services that are conducted during the week and on Sundays.  The choir is in high demand for performances around Pretoria and it has been invited to perform at the Voortrekker Monument, the Union Buildings, as well as at various church denominations.

The PAC also boasts a well-equipped Music Technology and Recording Studio with all the latest software and sound equipment that are available for use to all pupils and teachers, as well as for the general public at a nominal fee. Mr Jozua Loots, a qualified recording engineer, manages this facility on campus and is also in charge of the recording club that meets weekly.

Several annual events and opportunities for study and performance are devised during the course of the year:

  • Senior School Recitals
  • Junior School Recitals
  • Internal Practical Examinations (Term 1-3)
  • Grades 8-12 Subject Music Recitals (Term 1-3)
  • Arts & Culture Soirées
  • Music Open Day (Term 1)
  • Combined Junior & Senior School Concerts
  • Various Choir Festivals (Term 2)
  • Inter-house Music Competition (Term 3)

Every year our pupils successfully complete the ABRSM, TCL and UNISA Practical and Theoretical Examinations in their instruments of choice. The participating learners approach these activities with the deserved seriousness, and on the whole a high pass rate is achieved consistently.

The proud music tradition that had been established by those pioneering nuns and dedicated teachers over the many years since the commencement of St Mary’s DSG, is still as vibrant as ever; in fact, this beautiful and enriching tradition has actually grown and blossomed to new heights of excellence, popularity and enjoyment. The rest of the school has always taken full cognizance of this fact, and they actively support and succour the musical activities in every respect.

Theo van Wyk

Music Centre Manager

Music Staff List - 2014

Contract & Application form - Music 2014 - (39 KB)

Policy-Accompaniment Lessons - (55 KB)

Policy-Number of Lessons per term - (48 KB)

Policy-Theory Lessons - (50 KB)

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Afrikaans Afrikaans@dsg

Purpose of the language curriculum:

To enable learners to acquire knowledge, to express their identity, feelings and ideas, to interact with others and to manage their world.

Course Outline

Broaden and deepen language competencies so that learners are able to listen, speak, read/view and write/present with confidence that forms a basis for life-long learning.

  • Use language appropriately and accurately in real-life contexts.
  • Express and justify their own ideas, views and emotions confidently in order to become independent and analytical thinkers.
  • Listen, speak, write and present the language with confidence and enjoyment.
  • Use the language and their imagination to find out more about themselves and the world around them.
  • Use language to access and manage information for learning across the curriculum.
  • Use language as a tool for critical and creative thinking.

Overview of language skills and content:

·         Listening and Speaking

·         Reading and Viewing

·         Writing and Presenting

·         Language

 MEANS OF ASSESSMENT

Paper I                                

2½ hours

[100]

Paper II                             

2½ hours

[100]

Continuous assessment:    

Portfolio 

[100]

Oral

 

[100]

CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT

Continuous assessment is invaluable for assessing skills and knowledge that cannot be assessed by written examination papers.

Each Grade 12-learner will be required to represent his/her assignments in a folder for assessment by the IEB for moderation purposes by 31 September each year.

The portfolio will consist of five sections:

1.      Section A: Two pieces of extended writing of 250-350 words

2.      Section B: Common Assessment Task (CAT)

3.      Section C: Literature (3rd Genre )

4.      Section D: Tests

5.      Section E: Preparatory examination

 An External Examiner controls the oral IEB mark, which counts as almost a quarter of their final IEB Afrikaans symbol. The oral therefore plays an integral part in the subject.   Grade 8-12 learners have to read articles as well as Afrikaans books in their own time. They build up a reading file and this is presented to the external Oral Examiner.

Special Events

 Annually we take part in the following:

·         Afrikaans Olympiad

·         Pretoria Eisteddfod

·         National Eisteddfod 

·         The Van Huyssteens Oratorical Festival

Digital concert 2013!

The highlight in the learning area this year was the digital concert of 2013. The following lines from the poem Susan Boyle written by Kobus Grobler best describe the hidden talents that came to life at the digital concert of 2013:

“hoe jy jare se troeteltalent

aan die hele wêreld skenk”

This event created an opportunity for students under the guidance of the teachers to showcase their creativity in their respective classes. It included an e-news report of the matric farewell, adverts, poems, role play, and much more. The learners with their different languages, cultures and backgrounds came together to present one concert, living out the motto of the matriculants this year: We are one!

Pit-production: Prescribed book and poems

Professional Intelligent Theatre (PIT), a company based on vision, passion and pure positivity, send a group of professional actors to schools to present a tailor made performance of Afrikaans prescribed works. Performances are extremely energetic and are directed and choreographed by visionary directors.

Recent Achievements and Awards

21 out of 70 Grade 12 pupils passed with a distinction in Afrikaans in 2013. All of the girls passed Afrikaans. 

AFRIKAANS EXPO

Third position nationally - Corine de Koker

AFRIKAANS OLYMPIAD

SENIOR SECTION GRADE 10-12

Top 20 in the province

Olsen O.

De Koker C.

Maas C.

Kriel M

Top 100 National

Olsen O.

De Koker C.

Maas C.

Kriel M

 80% +

Grade 10

Kriel M.

Maas C.

Maritz ND

Grade 11

De Koker C.

Lawther D.S.

Olsen O.

Grade 12

Annandale M.

Snyman R.

Verster E.

JUNIOR SECTION GRADE 8-9

Second position nationally – Marieke De Koker

80%+

De Koker M.

Howell M.

What do we read?

Willem Poprok - Derick van der Walt

Sweef en ander verhale – Adinda Vermaak en Marieta Nel

Perfek – Jaco Jacobs

Liefde laat jou Rice Krispies anders proe -Tania Brink

Lien se lankstaanskoene - Derick van der Walt

Poems

Film Study

Hoofmeisie- Morné Du Toit

Lien se lankstaanskoene-Andre Odendaal

Paljas - Chris Barnard

Wolwedans in die Skemer – Leon Van Nierop

ONDERHOUD MET CARINA STANDER –VISUELE KUNSTENAAR, BEELDHOUER, DIGTER, VERHAALSKRYWER EN JOERNALIS

 

Ontmoet Carina…

 

Carina Stander is ‘n visuele kunstenaar beeldhouer, digter, verhaalskrywer en joernalis eie aan ons land en het onlangs ongelooflike werke geskep en baie pryse en eer verdien. Ons is almal baie trots op haar, maar ook nuuskierig en wil graag meer van haar weet. Kom ons vind uit.

Corine :

Goeiemiddag! Dit is ‘n voorreg om jou uiteindelik te ontmoet! Ongelukking is ons tyd baie beperk, so laat ons sommer dadelik wegval.  Kom ons begin by die begin. Waarvandaan kom jy?  Waar is jy gebore? 

Carina: 

Op ‘n plaas in die Waterberge in Limpopo.

Corine: 

Wat het jy na skool gaan doen? 

Carina: 

Ek het my Honneursgraad in Beeldende Kuns aan die Universiteit van Pretoria verwerf. Daarna  het ek vir ‘n paar jaar as ‘n beeldhouer in Cambridge gaan werk en toe is ek daarna Skotse Hooglande toe.

Corine:

Sjoe, dit klink opwindend! Wat doen jy op die oomblik? 

Carina:

Ek doen nog steeds beeldhouwerk en neem aan talle groep- en solo-uitstallings deel. Ek is ook ‘n vryskutjoernalis  vir ‘n aantal nasionale tydskrifte en koerante.

Corine:

Ek het ‘n bietjie navorsing gedoen en uitgevind jy was twee maal Artikelskrywer van die Jaar by die Media 24-tydskrif en Leef, en dat jy in 2011 ‘n finalis vir die ATKV-Mediaveertjie was!  Welgedaan! Vertel my bietjie van jou skryfkant.

Carina: 

Ek het al van kleins af gekryf en toe na skool my meestersgraad in Kreatiewe Skryfwerk aan die Universiteit van Kaapstad gaan doen. My digdebuut wat ek daarna geskryf het was op die kortlys vir die Universiteit van Johannesburg se debuutprys en het in die Groot  Verseboek verskyn. Ek publiseer nou in versamelbundels en van my kortverhale, gedigte en my roman is voorgeskryf vir skole.

Corine:

Sjoe! Maar jy het baie bereik! Ons Afrikaners is trots op jou dat jy ons taal nog lewendig hou. So gepraat van tale, ek hoor jou werk word vertaal en tot in musiek omskep!

Carina:

Ja, dis reg. Ek het ook die Goue Pen van Cordis Trust gekry en ‘n navorsingsbeurs ontvang om ‘n tweede roman te skryf.

Corine: 

Baie geluk! Om mee af te sluit:  waar en saam met wie woon jy nou?

Carina:

Ek woon al sedert 2008 saam met my man en twee seuns in Tsitsikamma, maar ons hou daarvan om rond te reis.

Corine: 

Dis lekker! Ongelukkig is ons tyd nou om. Dit was lekker om met jou te gesels en om meer van jou te leer. Baie dankie vir die voorreg!

Carina:

Ag, dis ‘n groot plesier! Dankie aan julle! Sonder mense is daar niemand om voor te skryf nie!

CORINE DE KOKER

Grade 11

National Afrikaans Ekspo - Bronze

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Social Networking Policy
Social Networking Policy - (66KB)

 

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Matric Results 2013 The matric results have once again shown St Mary’s DSG, Pretoria, to be a school of the highest academic standing. Once again, all pupils passed the exam, but more importantly 95% of the students qualified for university entrance to degree courses (BD) and 5% for diploma courses (D). Some of these may change with supplementary exams. The overall BD success rate for the national IEB cohort was 85% which places St Mary’s well above the norm, as it should be.

214 subject distinctions were earned in the full spectrum of subjects offered by the school. If one takes into account the fact that 40 marks were either 78% or 79%, the quality of these results is confirmed as one of the best results ever in the history of the school. (Indeed 231 results were above 70%, 57% of all results.) We must not be too distracted by distinctions however, and must remember that for some girls, the results that they did achieve, even without distinctions, were for them very significant mile stones indeed.

Emily Rose Miller was our top achiever being ranked in the “outstanding “ category by the IEB. She obtained 9 distinctions.

Other successes were:

Melany Codling                 9 distinctions

Heidi Burger                       8 distinctions

Courtenay Gerber           8 distinctions

Melissa Maxwell              8 distinctions

Philippa Cornwell             8 distinctions

Naa Buxton Tetteh          7 distinctions

Nicole Abreu                      6 distinctions

Ashlin McGarrigle            6 distinctions

Meghan Annandale        5 distinctions

Stellar Frisby                      5 distinctions

Letang Matlala                  5 distinctions

Wako Sefara                      5 distinctions

Jessica Slabbert                5 distinctions

Beryl Torthe                       5 distinctions

Emma Verster                   5 distinctions

Anneta Wamona              5 distinctions

 

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 9

St Marys's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 9- 2 December 2013

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 8

St Marys's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 8- 15 November 2013

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JUNIOR SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION JUNIOR SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The Junior School girls participate in formal PE lessons from grade 1-7. Girls have two lessons a week.

Strong emphasis is put on swimming, especially in the Foundation Phase. The Intersen Phase girls participate in synchronized swimming and life saving. During the second term, the emphasis is on ball skills, and girls are also introduced to ball sports which are not part of the afternoon sports programme, like cricket, softball, rugby and handball. Athletics also forms part of the PE curriculum and from Grade 1, girls are introduced to various events like long jump, high jump and hurdles.

JUNIOR SCHOOL AFTERNOON SPORTS PROGRAMME

The emphasis in the Junior School is on participation and being exposed to a wide variety of sporting activities. The following sports are offered:

1.    Athletics

Grade 0-7 girls all participate in the annual Sports Day, while the athletics team from Grade 1-7 participates in various Inter-School meetings.

2.    Basketball

Grade 1-7 girls are introduced to basketball. The Grade 6-7 girls also participate in friendly matches.

3.    Biathlon/Biathle

Girls participate in these sports during PE and the Inter-House competitions. A small group also participates in the Gauteng North league competitions and SA Championships.

4.    Cross Country

All girls participate in a House race, varying between 1and 3 km. The Cross Country team participates in various Inter-Schools meetings.

5.    Hockey

Girls play in the Inter-House matches, festivals and league matches. St Mary’s DSG hosts an annual festival in which 100 teams participate. Many St Mary’s DSG girls are selected every year for the provincial teams. The U11-U13 girls also go on a yearly sports tour during the April holidays.

6.    Netball

Girls play in the Inter-House matches, festivals and league matches. The U11-U13 girls also go on an annual sports tour during the April holidays.

7.    Swimming

St Mary’s DSG is known for its depth in swimming, and currently has 4 teams entered in the league. The A-team has won the A-league Inter-Primary gala 8 years in a row, and also participates in the Summer Splash festival in Johannesburg. The B and C teams are very competitive in their respective Inter-primary galas. The St Mary’sDSG swimmers also participate in the Midmar Mile every year and are not only a force to be reckoned with in numbers, but also in strength, winning the 2011and 2012 Primary Schools section.

8.    Squash

St Mary’s DSG has 4 squash courts and a professional squash coach. Girls can participate in squash from grade 2, and take part in festivals, league matches and provincial tournaments.

9.    Tennis

St Mary’s DSG participates in mini-tennis, in the U11 and U13 league. The girls can also play year- round non- competitive tennis.

10. Triathlon

This is a relatively new sport, but saw 50 girls competing in the 2nd year. St Mary’s DSG participates in the BSG/ Energade triathlon series, and won the schools division in 2011 and 2012. Some girls also participate at a provincial level.

The Junior School sports season is divided into five seasons.

Season 1

January- March

Grade 1-3

Swimming, Basketball, Squash

Grade 4-7

Swimming, Tennis, Squash and Dance Club

Season 2

March-June

Grade 1-3

Hockey and Netball

Grade 4-7

Hockey, Netball, Squash, Tennis

Season 3

June-August

Grade 1-3

Athletics, Squash, Tennis, Dance Club

Grade 4-7

Athletics, Basketball, Squash, Tennis

Season 4

September

Grade 1-3

Athletics, Swimming, Tennis, Squash, Dance Club

Grade 4-7

Athletics, Basketball, Swimming, Squash, Tennis

Season 5

 October-December

Grade 1-3

Swimming, Basketball, Tennis, Squash, Dance Club

Grade 4-7

Swimming, Basketball, Tennis, Squash, Dance Club

The Junior School Physical Education lessons link with the afternoon sports programme. All Grade 1-7 girls have two physical education lessons a week, during which the sport skills of that particular season are focussed on.

A minimum of three teachers are involved in every physical education lesson. This makes it possible for enrichment and re-inforcement to take place.

SPORT @ DSG

Sport and physical education is seen as an activity of personal expression, a physical experience necessitating mental effort, with a strong emotional component enabling individuals to express themselves physically, experience the pleasure of play, self-development, personal development and self-actualisation. It is about testing oneself, learning, allowing the competitive spirit to flourish in the pursuance of individual excellence and about winning. It makes a significant contribution by teaching values, fair play, teamwork and co-operation. It can enhance preparation for a lifetime of well being, being active and being involved, teaching self-discipline, self-respect, respect for others and competitive skills and behaviours.

Sport in all its many forms has a great deal to offer children and young people. Apart from the joy of physical activity in itself, it gives them the chance to develop a sense of self-worth, a knowledge of their own abilities, an opportunity to work in cooperation with others and an understanding of competition. Sport offers the chance to experiment with physical and emotional boundaries in a healthy and safe environment. In short, it gives children and young people the chance to develop some of the skills needed for living in our society.

The International Charter of Physical Education and Sport, produced by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), states that one of the essential conditions for achieving human rights should be freedom "to develop and preserve his or her physical, intellectual and moral powers, and that access to physical education and sport should consequently be assured and guaranteed for all human beings."

Aims

· To develop the physical, intellectual and moral powers of the learners and thereby improve the quality of life at all levels,

· To ensure a more effective contribution to the calculation of fundamental human values underlying the full development of people,

· To ensure that children and young people find enjoyment and lasting satisfaction through participating in physical activity,

· To encourage children and young people to adopt a fit and healthy lifestyle by making sports participation attractive, safe and enjoyable,

·To create opportunities for every learner to participate in sport at all different levels from Grade 0 – 12 from recreational to SA level,

· And, to make adults aware that children play to satisfy themselves and not necessarily to satisfy adults and their ambition.

Physical Education

Physical Education classes form part of the official morning and Life Orientation school programme. It is offered from Grade 0 – 10.

Sports Offered:

Athletics

u8-u18

Inter-House competitions

Basketball

u8-u18

Biathlon

u9-u18

Hockey

u8-u18

u8-u9 Mini Hockey

Netbll

u8-u18

u8-u9 Mini Netball

Squash

u9-u18

u9 Mini Squash

Swimming

u8-u18

Tennis

u8-u18

U8-u9 Mini Tennis

Individuals who do not want to participate at a competitive level can do Cross-Country, Squash, Swimming and Tennis as a module throughout the year.

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School Assessment Policy
School Assessment Policy - ()

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Assessment Policy http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=65612 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 7 St Marys's Matters - Volume 13, Issue - 4 October 2013

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 6 St Marys's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 6 - 2 August 2013 ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=65487 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 5 St Marys's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 5 - 28 June 2013]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=65445 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 4 St Mary's Matters - Issue 4 Vol 13 - 31 May 2013 ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=65444 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 3 St Mary's Matters - Issue 3 Vol 13 - 12 April 2013]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=50168 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 2 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13 - Issue 2 - 12 March 2013 - (1.8 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=45730 St Mary's Matters - Volume 13, Issue 1 St Mary's Matters - Issue 1 Vol 13 - 8 February 2013]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=16706 Matric Results 2012  

I am extremely proud to release the 2012 matric results to the community.

All of our 98 candidates passed the exam, with 94 (97.5%) achieving a ‘BD’ (Bachelor Degree) result.  The National Average for candidates writing the IEB exam was an 83.6% BD result.  4 candidates obtained a ‘D’ (Diploma) result.

There were 216 distinctions obtained – certainly the best ever at an average of 2.2 per pupil. These were obtained across the board in every subject, as listed on the accompanying page. 39 subject results were within 2% of a distinction.

Martine du Preez achieved 9 distinctions.

The 2012 Dux Scholar, Naledi Mahlase, achieved 8 distinctions, as did Cordelle Annor.

Cassandra Erdis and Daryl Ilsley received 7 distinctions.

The 2012 Head Girl, Mikhalya Bader, achieved 6 distinctions, as did Hikhensile Shibambo and Kendall Smit.

Cecily Claassen, Chanel du Toit, Liza Foot, Antonia Michael, Tiisetso Mohapi, Botlhale Mosoane, Lusanda Nogxina, Ditshwanelo Shinners, Simphiwe Sigaba and Ashleigh Trotter all received 5 distinctions.

Only 64 of the 728 subject results recorded had marks below 50%.

These results confirm the reputation and tradition of St Mary’s DSG in Pretoria for academic excellence. Our “Daughters of the King” have once again responded to the challenge and are to be warmly congratulated.

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 10 St Mary's Matters - Issue 10 Vol 12 - 30 November 2012]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=5466 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 9 St Mary's Matters - Issue 9 Vol 12 - 5 November 2012]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=5463 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 8 St Mary's Matters - Issue 8 Vol 12 - 5 October 2012]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=5462 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 7 http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=5460 Culture ]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=5457 Welcome from the Head Girl Welcome to St Mary’s DSG


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Senior School Policy on Bullying Senior School Policy on Bullying - (167kb)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4303 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 6 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 6 - (378kb)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4301 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 5 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 5 - (1MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4294 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 4 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 3 - ()]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4288 Academic Integrity Policy Academic Integrity Policy - ()]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4286 Policy on submission of work Policy on submission of work - ()]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4284 Academic support


The DSG motto says “If she believes in herself, she will fly”. In order to develop self confidence in pupils, staff at St Mary’s provide academic support for all pupils.

Pupils are encouraged to become responsible, independent learners. They should be self-motivated and have sufficient self discipline to reach their goal. In order to achieve this goal pupils should:

  • Be attentive in class in order to benefit from the input from the teacher.
  • Make use of any “free” periods without being supervised.
  • Ensure that they have a personal “time-plan” in operation.
  • Begin revising for examinations well beforehand.

An academic support programme is in operation in order to help pupils who require extra practice in certain subjects or who have missed school. Teachers are available in the afternoon with the times varying between subject departments.

Accounting

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

Afrikaans:

Mrs Sujee:

·         Every Tuesday 14h15-15h00

Mrs M. Jorissen:

·         Every Monday and Tuesday 14h15-15h00

Mrs. L. Ferreira:

By arrangement

Business Studies

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

Consumer Studies:

Tuesday – Thursday afternoons, by arrangement with the teacher involved.

Dramatic Arts: 

Rehearsal time when pupils are preparing for a production and by arrangement.

English:

The computer laboratory has an enrichment programme: “Readers are Leaders” installed on the system to encourage students to improve their reading and comprehension skills.

Extra lessons are arranged for pupils who have a specific need to improve class performance. Pupils may request to attend extra lessons by arrangement with the teacher involved.

French:

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

Geography:                                    

By appointment.

 During exam times, an afternoon schedule is set.

History:

All grades: Monday 14:30 – 15:30

 Gr 11 & 12: Tuesdays 14:15 – 15:15

Information Technology: 

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

Life Orientation

Mrs de Villiers is available by appointment until 16h45 most weekdays.  Appointment lists are available on the pin board outside the office door.

Life Sciences:

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

Music:

Thursdays from 14:15-15:00 or as per arrangement with specific/individual teachers.

Mathematics:

1.     All teachers in the Mathematics Department provide extra tuition on request.  Each educator will give assistance to learners from her register Mathematics class by appointment.

2.     The Mathematics Department has a library of Compu-Maths DVDs.  All girls are invited to use these DVDs, but as they are reference DVDs they may not be removed from the school.  Girls are required to bring their own laptops when using this facility, which is available in all the Maths classrooms.

3.     All learners finding Mathematics more challenging must attend weekly extra Maths class one afternoon each week (by grade) with a dedicated Maths teacher, who will recap that week’s work, in order to improve the girls understanding and confidence in the subject.  This programme runs every Monday or Tuesday from 2.15 – 3.15pm.  These classes are compulsory for invited girls.

Sepedi:                                           

Monday – Thursday afternoons

Physical Science: 

Extra classes grade 12

Tuesday/Thursday 13:55 – 14:55 – Ms. Botha

Grade 11 –   13:25-13:55; 14:15-14:55 – Mrs. Ward

Grade 10 – Monday 16:00 – 17:00

Every second Wednesday 14:00 – 14:55

Friday – 14:00 – 14: 55 – Mrs.Labuschagne

If more help is needed, by appointment.

Technology:           

Tuesday – Thursday afternoons, by arrangement with the teacher involved.

Visual Arts:

By arrangement with the teacher involved.

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Grade 5 Grade 5 is a wonderful time in a girl’s life. It is a time when they are filled with a new kind of confidence and a determination to succeed in all they do. It is a time when they leave their childhood behind, to head towards their teenage years.  As teachers, we use this transition to teach them many skills for their busy lives, incorporating them into their academic work.

 

The girls have a Grade 5 garden, used for science projects, planning skills and group work – it is also a place to gather their thoughts and gives them a sense of belonging.  They plan a 3-course banquet, and learn to organise celebrations, hypothesise, prove and evaluate in their Science Expo, prepare speeches to present to large groups of people, design packaging for the flap jacks that they cook in class, study famous characters, travel around South Africa in the past and present and do research using various technologies.

 

We have various outings and a 3-day camp at the beginning of the year. Various visitors share their expertise with us, covering many areas of their school lives.

 

By the end of the year, they have become young, independent teens, with a happy sense of self-worth, and enough confidence to carry them through the next phase of their school life.

 

Maths in Grade 5

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Grade 1 Learning to read and write - the starting point of formal schooling. Wearing uniforms and having their own stationery, what an exciting start. The Grade 1’s learn about the school – how St. Mary’s DSG started and what an amazing and fun place it is now. The Grade 1’s get introduced to a variety of sports and different cultural activities.

Our themes range from: Transport ( bike rides on the field) to Pets, which includes the good work of the Guide Dog Association of South Africa. We decorate box construction bedrooms when we discuss Homes. Then we discover South African wild animals and go to the Zoo. Fruit and Vegetables show our culinary skills at making delicious fruit salads. The Grade 6’s help us do our own Dinosaur projects. The Sea gets us in the mood for our approaching Christmas holidays.

We go out each week to art, music and drama, and computers with specialist teachers. Reading Room books and library books are an extension to class reading and eagerly swopped. We do assembly for the Junior school in the second and third terms, so are fully active in our chapel services. F2T groups run by “their” Grade 7 ensures the girls feel included in all fun activities and areas of the school.

By the end of Grade 1, the girls have progressed from writing words to simple stories; from reading words to books; from attempted spelling, to applied spelling. Using fingers to add and subtract becomes quick mental maths. And learning is just an extension of fun in a year of enormous growth and development!

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Grade 3 Grade 3 is an exciting year in the life of a St Mary’s DSG girl. They are the “big girls” in the Foundation Phase. There are more responsibilities that come with this position. The girls are given turns to be Foundation Phase monitors. They help to ensure that the girls in the Foundation Phase are cared for and that the school values are upheld at all times.

In Grade 3 the girls go on camp. This is their first camp which they go on without any parents. They are away for one night and have the time of their lives!

Near the end of the Grade 3 year there is great excitement as the girls earn their pen licenses. This is awarded on merit and takes a lot of diligence on the girl’s part to earn.

During the year we learn about food and we become connoisseurs of weird and wonderfully flavoured foods. We become inventors and scientists. The sky is the limit! We draw closer to our beautiful world by learning about the waterbirds in our country and ways in which we can conserve our fragile earth. We scare the living daylights out of staff and girls when we come to school in our pirates clobber! Then we take off into the solar system and surround ourselves with the planets before returning to Earth and heading off to camp!

It is a busy year in which the girls mature considerably and become independent thinkers ready to face the new and exciting realms of the Intersen Phase.

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Grade 4  Our goal in Grade 4 is to engender ‘Happy, fulfilled girls!’  It is the beginning of the intersen phase and is an exciting adventure into early adulthood.  The girls are encouraged to get to know themselves through their experiences here at St Mary’s DSG. We endeavour to stimulate the girls in a happy environment where the teachers are passionate about meeting each one at their point of need. We are serious about girls’ education and strive to ensure that St Mary’s girls have well-developed self esteem. 

In Grade 4 we have a class teacher system leading on from the foundation phase.  The class teachers teach Mathematics, English, Natural Science and Social Science.  Afrikaans, Art, Sepedi, Media Studies, Class Music and Physical Education are subjects taught by specialist teachers.  Our classroom programme is designed firstly to allow for a smooth transition into the intersen phase, and secondly  to build a firm foundation, to stand the girls in good stead, and allow them to move forward with confidence.

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Grade 6 Grade 6 is the year in which St Mary's DSG girls become little ladies. They grow and mature and are given tasks which enable them to think creatively, intelligently and “out of the box”.  The highlight of Grade 6 is the week away at Camp Upendi. For many girls, and moms, this is the first time they are away from home for a week. The camp is excellent as is the food. The activities are vast and varied and the girls are kept so busy that they rarely have time to be homesick.  The sciences are merged and are reflected in the activities.

Grade 6 is also the year when the girls go on numerous educational outings.  They go to the Pretoria Museum, Scienza and the Mapungubwe exhibition, the Botanical Gardens or Margaret Roberts, and the Pretoria Zoo. The most exciting event of the English curriculum is the Medieval Banquet where the girls are transported back in time. They spend the day dancing, eating and entertaining the king and queen with sonnets, musical items and with acrobatic jesters. A royally good time is had by all.

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Information Technology Every girl from Grade 0 to Grade 7 at St Mary’s DSG Junior School attends Computer Literacy Lessons for 1 hour per week.  In addition, Grade 4, 5 and 6 pupils have an hour in the Computer Lab dedicated to Language and half an hour to improve their Mathematical skills.  They are then encouraged to use these skills at home to complete an on- line Maths programme, Mathletics. Teachers from Grade 1 – 7 set work for their girls to complete on line which has led to a great interest in Maths. We also run Junior and Senior Computer Clubs in the afternoons and the computer lab is also used for extra lessons. Most classrooms are equipped with Smartboards and additional computers.  Information Technology is used extensively at St Mary’s DSG Junior School and our girls learn computers skills which they will take with them through life.

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English is Alive at St Mary's DSG Our English Department works closely together, focusing on the needs of all the children, making sure that the grasp of the Language in the Junior School, is in place.

Reading for Meaning is at the core of our teaching, and with the importance of this in mind, all classes visit the Library, where a love of reading is fostered.   This is also evident in class reading that takes place.

In addition, paired reading with parents is ongoing, once a term, for all Grades.

“Readers are Leaders” is part of the morning timetable, and here the Grade 5 – 6 are able to hone their skills.

The Department runs a Speech Festival;  Literacy week, with visiting booksellers and storytellers being part of the programme;  “Hooked on Books” is one of the highlights of  the year, where inspiration to read is engendered through the dramatisation of various book episodes.

Public speaking and Choral Verse happens regularly, culminating in an Interhouse Competition, and Drama productions offer further opportunity to enhance  reading for meaning, memory skills and interpretation of text.

Michelle Savage

HOD : Intersen Phase

February 2012

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Aftercare

Aftercare at St Mary’s DSG is offered from after school until 18:00  everyday.  Mrs Masimula, Mrs Barnes and Ms Thokoa are the full-time supervisors looking after the girls and are assisted by the Foundation Phase assistants in the early part of the afternoon.  Supervised homework is offered during the afternoon to accommodate the girls involved in their extra-curricular activities.  There are various indoor and outdoor activities for the girls to enjoy when homework and extra-curricular activities are finished.  Girls are signed in when they arrive at Aftercare and are signed out by the person collecting them.  All girls are welcome at Aftercare as there is no additional cost.

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Sepedi As part of the curriculum the girls in Grades 5 and 6 visited Lesedi Cultural Village in North West to learn more about the culture. They enjoyed themselves a lot, and learnt a lot of things. The Grades 7s visited Willem Prinsloo Agricultural Museum to learn about transport and farming in the olden days. They were overwhelmed at what they have saw, learned and experienced.

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Values Programme in the Junior School 2012
Values Programme in the Junior School 2012 - (17.6 KB)
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Maths in Grade 6 and 7 Maths in grade 6 and 7 Maths is not always a ‘stay in your seat quiet lesson’. Infact, at times, it is completely the opposite! There are many different fun ways for students to learn and study mathematical concepts. Using math-based games or themed activities are just a few methods we use frequently in our Maths classes . We often relate our Maths lessons to everday life. We also find ways to apply the learned concepts outside of the classroom by involving the girls in activities such as mathematical matching games, banking activities, measurement around our beautiful school and also take them back in time to discover how early ancient cultures used Mathematics. Our lessons are active, engaging and fun!

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 3 St Mary's Matters March - (2.5 MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4249 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 2 St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 2 - (1.34MB)]]> http://www.stmarys.pta.school.za/pebble.asp?relid=4235 Matric Results 2011 Congratulations to the class of 2011

 

·         81 candidates

 

·         100% pass rate for the 22nd year in a row

 

·         141 distinctions

 

·         79 learners (97.5%) qualified for Bachelor Degree Studies. The National Average for candidates writing the IEB exam was an 81% BD result

 

·         2 learners qualified for Diploma Studies

 

Special mention:

 

·         2011 Dux Scholar, Sarah Adam, achieved the highest aggregate with 8 distinctions. She was ranked in the top 1% nationally in History, English and Life Orientation

 

·    Nicola Gawler achieved 9 distinctions, and the 2011 Head Girl, Endri Olsen achieved 8 distinctions. Endri was rated in the IEB “Commendable” list. For this Endri was ranked in the top 5% of all students in 5 subjects.

 

·       Clara de Jongh, Lizelle Maas, Suzanne Mouton and Boiketlo Mphahlele got 6 distinctions. Suzanne was also rated in the “Commendable” list of the IEB.

 

·       Natalie Collis, Erna Freyer, Kathleen Gauton and Lerusha Naidoo achieved 5 distinctions each.

 

·       Endri Olsen, Annyke Loots and Suzanne Mouton were ranked in the top 1% for Afrikaans. Clara de Jongh and Suzanne Mouton were ranked in the top 1% for Business Studies. Lerusha Naidoo and Kathleen Gauton were ranked in the top 1% for History. Dineo Mnisi was ranked in the top 1% for Sepedi.

·       The school’s averages were in every subject the same as or higher than the IEB average.

 

·       Only 35 of the 563 subject results recorded had marks below 50%.

 

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Accounting accounting@dsg

  

Mission Statement 

Give a man a fish

And you feed him for a day.

Teach a man to fish

And you feed him for a lifetime.

 

Introduction 

Accounting is a subject that has developed over a long period of time.  As trade developed in the world, so too did the need to have some means of payment for goods, other than bartering one commodity for another.  Something of value was needed as a means of exchange = MONEY!

 

 Accounting is relevant to our everyday activities, as we all use money to purchase goods and services.  We all need a plan or budget and we all need to understand financial reports.

 

Preamble 

What is Accounting?

 

In the early days, it developed because there was a need to keep a record of transactions entered into between people.  More recently it has developed to a high degree of sophistication in determining the efficiency and value of complex companies.

 

You may reason that the computer normally handles the recording processes for you, but in order to understand what the computer is doing, it is necessary to perform the processes manually first.

 

Curriculum Outline 

Grades 8 and 9:

 

1.       Money and Banking

2.       Investments and savings

3.       Cash and credit purchases

4.       The Economic cycle

5.       Labour relations and laws

6.       Public relations, social and environmental responsibility

7.       Entrepreneurship

8.       Informal and Formal Sector

9.       Forms of ownership

10.     Finances of a small business:

·         Service undertaking

·         Retailer

 

 

Grade 10:

 

  • Measure the performance of a business
  • What is the difference between formal and informal bookkeeping systems?
  • The recording of cash and credit transactions
  • The need and calculation of VAT
  • Why is computerised accounting important?
  • Why is there a big difference between what my employer told me I am going to get, and what I am actually paid?-Calculation of salaries and wages.
  • Understanding and preparing of financial statements
  • Managerial Accounting
  • Internal control and ethics
  • Manufacturing business

 

 Grade 11

 

  • Is my bank statement telling the truth?
  • Do I make a profit or a loss when I get rid of my old car? Asset disposal
  • If I open my own small business, should I make use of the periodic inventory system?
  • What if my best friend and I want to start a business together? Partnerships.
  • How does a budget assist me in making sure I have enough money when I need it?
  • How do I record the unfinished products of my factory?
  • If I am the treasurer of my tennis club, what is expected of me?

 

 Grade 12:

 

  • Do I understand how a company operates?  What are shares and dividends?
  • How do you keep the records of a closed corporation?
  • How can I use my cash budget to the business’ benefit?
  • Do my debtors pay me on time?
  • How much is my stock worth and which valuation method id the best for my business?
  • My business is making a profit but is it worthwhile, or should I investigate another investment?

 

Skills taught in Accounting

 

In an article written by Pfaff in New Jersey USA early in 1970, the high school course is to enhance the ability of a student to understand his economic environment and to conceptualize the terminology found on financial statements.   Accounting and EMS are life skills.   In studying Accounting and doing EMS activities, other benefits may also be derived, such as:

  • Learning how to think clearly and logically in order to make decisions
  • Self discipline - if you do not handle your money in a disciplined manner your financial position could deteriorate and you could end up bankrupt
  • Accuracy - if you are not accurate in, for example, determining cost prices, you are going to make a loss in your business
  • Learning to be analytical - you have to analyse your results to make decisions regarding the future of your own finances
  • Communication skills
  • Role play
  • Numerical skills
  • Peer assessment
  • Brainstorming.

 

 Practicals, assignments and projects

 

Grade 8:

EMS

·         Entrepreneurs market

·         Brochure

·         Budget

·         Business Plan

Grade 9:

EMS

·         Banango Traders a business simulation.

·         Intranet quiz on Accounting concepts

Grade 10: 

·         Pastel Grade 10

·         Presentation

·         Research Assignment

Grade 11: 

  • Evaluate a partnership and presenting the findings by means of a Power Point presentation.
  • Pastel Grade 11  

Grade 12: 

  • Project on Analysis and Interpretation of a Public Companies statements.
  • Pastel Grade 12

 

Assessment and Examinations 

Tests and examinations are being set with the aim of evaluating insight, encouraging expression of opinions by pupils and requiring analysis and interpretation of information.  The underlying aim is to assist all pupils in achieving their maximum potential, by providing a challenge to pupils at all levels of ability. The pupils write 2 papers in the Accounting examination. Paper I focuses on the application of skills and Paper II focuses on problem solving and analysis. The end-of-year examinations contribute 75% of the year mark.

 

Many of the Accounting and EMS activities are assessed by means of a portfolio or collection of work, for example: projects; presentations; simulations; case studies; debate. The portfolio constitutes 25% of the year mark.

Enrichment and Special events

  • Virtually no bookkeeping process is done by hand these days.  Therefore it is important to be able to make use of an Accounting computer package. The pupils are familiarised with the Pastel School Package in Grade 10, 11 and 12. Pastel issues a certificate to those candidates that passed the exam with merit.
  • An Entrepreneurs' Market will be held in the second term.(Grade 8)
  • JSE /Liberty Life Investment Challenge (Grade 11)

 

Career Paths and Opportunities

  • Actuary/ Insurance Broker
  • Agricultural Economist
  • Banker/ Financial Manager / Broker
  • Business Economist / Business Manager
  • Chartered Accountant
  • Econometrician
  • Economist
  • Investment Analyst
  • Internal Auditor
  • Information Manager / Programmer / System Analyst
  • Legal Advisor
  • Marketing Manager
  • Personnel Manager
  • Industrial Psychologist
  • Sports Manager / Recreation Manager
  • Statistician
  • Tax Consultant
  • Tourism Manager / Hotel Manager

 

General 

If your daughter is intending to follow any B Com university course, it is in her own interest to have Accounting as a Matric subject.  The failure rate for first year students without Accounting is exceptionally high.

 

This learning area introduces many practical aspects of finances.  Even if you study a course totally different, for instance, medicine, you still need to be able to handle and understand your finances.

 

Accounting and EMS enable women to have their own business at home by keeping someone else's books.  This is very convenient when you have small children.  Knowledge of accountancy protects you in a society like ours where fraud flourishes.

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English Mission Statement

English is both the foundation and cornerstone of effective communication. It is within this framework that every facet of communication is made possible both academically and socially.

At St Mary’s DSG it is our aim to equip our girls with the necessary skills to communicate in a number of interesting and relevant fields. We also strive to instil a love and enjoyment of the English language. The girls are taught a critical awareness of various texts, how language is manipulated to alter style and meaning and they are exposed to a wide variety of multi-media. Furthermore, with excellent English skills, pupils may compete with confidence for world-wide career opportunities.

Curriculum Outline

The curriculum is based on the Department of Education Subject Assessment Guidelines to reflect the learning areas of:

·         Learning Outcome 1: LISTENING AND SPEAKING

The learner is able to listen and speak for a variety of purposes, audiences and contexts.

·         Learning Outcome 2: READING AND VIEWING

The learner is able to read and view for understanding and to evaluate critically and respond to a wide range of texts.

·         Learning Outcome 3: WRITING AND PRESENTING

The learner is able to write and present for a wide range of purposes and audiences using conventions and formats appropriate to diverse contexts.

·         Learning Outcome 4: LANGUAGE STRUCTURE AND USAGE

The learner is able to use language structures and conventions appropriately and effectively.

These skills are taught in an integrated manner with emphasis on the application of the skills and the development of insight and higher order cognitive processes.

Language includes: comprehension and language techniques. There is an emphasis on recognition of appropriate tone, style and register in different types of writing in order to teach better communication skills. Language in the visual and written media is also emphasised.

Literature includes: plays, novels and poetry, both international and South African.  A holistic approach is used in the teaching of the various genres linking the relevant themes to the experiences of the learner.  The use of drama and multi-media is of huge benefit in this regard.  It is our wish that a love and appreciation of the linguistic and artistic beauty of literature will be instilled in learners as well as to develop a passion for reading that will enrich the girls’ lives far beyond their school years.

Original writing incorporates various types of transactional writing as well as essay and poetry writing. The learners are encouraged to express themselves creatively whilst developing an individual style and “voice”.

Oral work includes: dramatic presentations, media presentations, prepared and unprepared speeches, reading, debating, conversational skills and listening comprehensions. We aim to develop the girls’ confidence and communicative abilities.

Visual literacy encompasses the study of a variety of films and visual media to enable learners to view with discrimination and to understand film technology and techniques. A critical approach to the viewing of films is a life skill. The girls are also exposed to various other forms of audio-visual material such as radio and television, advertising as well as propaganda techniques.

Homework, Assignments and Projects

Homework is set on a regular basis in order to supplement and extend classroom work. Each girl has a home reader in addition to the literature being studied in class.  Projects are set within the different grades and will reflect different aspects of language use, media and literature study.  It is intended that research and presentation skills be acquired and that learners realize the joy and satisfaction of discovering information for themselves. The girls are given tasks and tests in order to learn, improve and reinforce their skills.

Syllabus Content

Visual Literacy

Over the past ten years the visual literacy component of the English syllabus has grown in importance. The emphasis on audio-visual media has been extended to include television, film study, radio and the use of the internet. The use of the laptops, SmartBoards and Data Projectors has greatly enhanced the teaching of the Visual Literacy.  There is a focus on how the media manipulates language and the visual medium. From Grade 8 through to Grade 12, learners are taught to become perceptive and discriminating viewers - something that will undoubtedly stand them in good stead throughout their lives.

In Grade 8, learners are introduced to visual literacy through drawings and photographs. They are exposed to film study at a very basic level and are introduced to basic film techniques.  From Grade 9 onwards they begin to study full-length films and become familiar with film techniques and terminology.

The current visual literacy syllabus is composed of the following films: Fly Away Home, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Atonement, Dead Poets Society, Twelfth Night and Shakespeare in Love. Several other films, chosen for their value as study tools, are available and can be used as extra material especially when studying Shakespeare.

Textbooks

All learners are required to have a copy of "English Handbook and Study Guide" by Lutrin and Pincus. This will serve as a reference book until matric.  The Grades 8-11 learners study poetry from a variety of anthologies.  The Grade 12 poems are prescribed by the IEB from the anthology Clusters.

Grades 8-12 are issued with poetry packs which include copies of all the poems they will be analysing, poetry questions and notes on poetry terminology.  The poetry is also placed on the school Intranet so that learners may work electronically.

Literature study involves the important process of immersing the learner in the greatest novels and plays of the English-speaking world. At the same time, cognisance must be taken of patterns of human behaviour relevant to the life of a teenager. A careful blend of both has led us to classical and modern literature for both class and home reading, as follows:

Grade 8

Back Home, Romeo and Juliet, Millions, Through a Glass Darkly, The Windsinger, One More River and short stories.

Grade 9

To Sir With Love, Down Street, The Pearl, The Snow Goose, To Kill A Mockingbird, Short Stories of Our Time, An Inspector Calls, White Fang, The Outsiders, Rebecca, Saving Francesca and Much Ado About Nothing.

Grade 10

The Syringa Tree, The Merchant of Venice, Cry the Beloved Country and short stories.

 Grade 11

In Grade 11, the girls are given a chance to make a choice between novels. They are given a choice of four novels:  I heard an Owl Call my Name, The Great Gatsby, The Kite Runner or Lord of the Flies.  Macbeth is the Shakespeare this year.  Their film study is Shakespeare in Love, Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night.

Grade 12

This is dictated by the IEB syllabus which currently consists of : King Henry V, The Scarlet Letter and The Crucible (4th Genre)

Career Paths and Opportunities

English is an important component of the entrance requirements for tertiary education.  The most obvious career paths for students of English are those careers where effective communication is vital:

Journalism
Drama
Teaching
Advertising
Public Relations
Television and Radio

Special Events

The school runs many extra-curricular activities that help reinforce and develop the English skills learned in the classroom. During the course of the year, a number of exciting events take place in the English Department:

·         Term 1:

-English Olympiad course and examination run by The Grahamstown Foundation and SACEE

-Pretoria Public Speaking Contest  

-Old Girls Essay Competition    

-The writer’s club submit pieces of writing to enter into the English Alive Anthology (SACEE)

·         Term 2:

-The Inter-House Public Speaking Contest

-Debaters challenge other schools

-An evening in which items from the English and language classrooms are presented

-Poetry week  and The Rowena Navikas Poetry Competition

         Term 3:

-Participation in the Highveld English Festival

-Interpretive Reading evening

In addition to these activities, there are opportunities to visit the theatre as well as visits to the school by theatre groups who perform plays and poetry collages on subjects relevant to the syllabus.

Extra Opportunities for Involvement

English Olympiad

DSG scholars have always attained excellent results in the English Olympiad examination. The Olympiad is a self-study examination, set by the Grahamstown Foundation. Although the girls have access to enrichment tutorials in which the material is discussed, they are encouraged to engage in independent study for the Olympiad.

 

Public Speaking Contests and Debating

Pupils are encouraged to enter the annual  Pretoria Schools Festivals. During the second term of the year, DSG runs an Inter-House Public Speaking contest that helps to promote the learners’ communication skills and creativity, as well as their confidence.  A Debating Club helps promote the girls’ speaking skills and interactive workshops with other schools take place regularly. Festivals and Workshops that are offered by various Oratorical Groups will be entered for continued enrichment.

 

The Gavel Club

The Gavel Club at the St Mary’s Diocesan School for Girls, Pretoria, is a public speaking club which follows the format of Toastmasters International. Every meeting takes place once a month on a Monday evening and is presented as a supper meeting.
The aim of The Gavel Club is for the learners to acquire the skills of presenting prepared and impromptu speeches according to a prescribed theme in a congenial atmosphere. The learners also learn to evaluate one another’s performances and make constructive suggestions for improvements.

Each meeting has a prescribed theme, which blends the light-hearted with the more serious aspects of public speaking. The club is open only to the Grade 11 and 12 learners and requires a one-year commitment.

 

Interpretive Reading

This activity entails honing of the skill of reading aloud for entertainment. Pupils are required to introduce and then read a piece of prose for the duration of 8 minutes. The texts chosen for reading are to be of literary merit.

 

Film Fanatics

The aim of the club is for learners to appreciate and critically analyse film.  Learners are introduced to different genres of film such as adventure, comedy, crime mystery, fantasy and documentaries.  Each term, a selection of approximately five genres is carefully made and learners are invited to offer criticisms after viewing a film. At every viewing session, there is a treat in which to indulge.

Film Fanatics is a club which gives learners an opportunity to exercise and refine their skills as a film critic, like our greatly admired Barry Ronge. 

ADVANCED PROGRAMME ENGLISH

We are delighted to be presenting Advanced Programme English to girls in Grade 11 and 12. Exploring advanced levels of Poetry as well as a variety of Novels and a Number of Films, the course challenges and inspires both the pupils and the staff involved.

Staff

Head of Department:

Mrs Youveshni Singh

BA (University of Natal - Durban)

HDipEd (University of Natal – Durban)

BEd (Hons) University of Natal – Durban)

Mrs Olga Nel

BA (University of Witwatersrand)

HDipEd (University of Witwatersrand)

BA (Hons) English Language and Literature (University of South Africa)

Mrs Inka Vonkeman

BA (University of Potchefstroom)

HDipEd (University of Pretoria)

BEd (Hons) (University of South Africa)

ACE English (University of South Africa)

 

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St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 1
St Mary's Matters - Volume 12, Issue 1 - (818kb)

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Life Orientation life orientation

@ dsg

   

The greatest challenge in Life Orientation lies in creating an environment that will inspire the students to embrace the holistic unfolding of who they are on an intellectual, physical, personal, social, spiritual and emotional level and to explore and discover the way these facets work together and the need for continuous personal growth.


(de Villiers & Lemmer on Van Rensburg; Van den Horst & McDonald 2003:99)


Life Orientation as a Learning Area

  • Life Orientation is the study of the self in relation to others and to society on a personal, social, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, physical motor growth and development of learners.

  • Life Orientation guides and prepares learners for life, its responsibilities and possibilities – it equips learners to solve problems and make informed decisions and choices.

  • Life Orientation is an inter-disciplinary subject that draws on integrated knowledge, values and skills imbedded in various Career and Study Fields.

  • Physical Education is also included as part of Life Orientation. This is aimed at equipping students with the necessary skills to maintain a healthy lifestyle through participation in physical activities and to allow them to adopt sport and physical recreation as a lifetime commitment. Physical Education also runs hand in hand with sport at DSG, as it is imperative that the coaches and learners use the tools in Physical Education to improve the standard of school sport.

Focus Areas covered in Grade 8 – 9 (CAPS) include:

Development of the self in society

  •  Decision making regarding personal health, self assertion and peer pressure

  •  Decision making regarding community and environmental health

Health, social and environmental responsibility

·          Commitment to and understanding of constitutional rights and responsibilities

  •  Develop and enforce an understanding of diverse cultures and religions

Constitutional rights and responsibilities

  •  Intra and Inter Personal Relationships

  •  Acquisition of life skills to achieve and extend personal potential

  •  Develop skills to effectively respond to challenges of her world

Physical Education  

  •  Promotion of body awareness

  •  Promotion of movement and physical development

World of work

  •  Rights and responsibilities in the workplace

  •  Reflect on and makes subject choices for Grade 10 to 12

  •  Researches study and career possibilities

Life Orientation from Gr 10 – 11 (CAPS)

   "It's like, the Science of being a human, and that's hard!”


(Candace Gawler, Gr 11 W, St. Mary's DSG, 2007).

The elevation of Life Orientation to that of a compulsory subject provides the opportunity to implement a new, but exciting and dynamic programme.  Our Aim is to enhance the learners' perspective on life and society as well as their role and responsibilities towards the self and society.

Focus Areas covered in the FET Phase

(Gr 10 - 11: CAPS)

In Grade 10, the Life orientation curriculum is divided into the following 6 Topics:

  • Development of the self in society

  • Social and environmental responsibility

  • Democracy and Human Rights

  • Careers and career choices

  • Study Skills

  • Physical Education

(Grade 12)

LO1 - Personal well-being:

  • Development of personal identity, self-development and building lasting relationships with self, family and peers

  • Various and diverse influences in society that impact on the well-being of self and others

  • Development of life skills to cope with stress, crisis situations and personal challenges that impact on lasting relationships with self, family and peers

  • Gender equity and the impact of gender specific challenges

LO2 - Citizenship Education:

  •  Active participation in the exploration of human rights issues in our immediate, national and international communities

  •  Open discussion and investigation of current social issues i.e. discrimination, economic and social justice, sustainable living etc.

  • Diversity i.e. Gender, Religion, Culture, Ethnicity etc.

  • Democratic participation as guaranteed by the Constitution and Bill of Rights

LO3 - Recreation and Physical Activity:

  •  Nutrition and building a healthy and balanced life-style

  •  Physical Activity for sustainable physical health

  •  Participation in organised and recreational sporting activities

  • Participation in environmental outdoor games

  • Issues concerning safety in physical exercise. This is implemented through activities such as lifesaving.

LO4 - Careers and Career choices:

  •  Identifying and developing personal interests, knowledge , skills and abilities for future success

  •  Current Career and Entrepreneurial options available and in demand 

  •  Accessing Information Study and Career options both nationally and internationally

  •  Alternative Tertiary Options to University, GAP year opportunities and self-employment opportunities

Time management and goal setting, Learning Styles, Study methods and Study Habits, Stress Management and Examination-writing skills form an integral part of both the Personal well-being and Career Focus Areas throughout the High School Life Orientation programme.

Career and Study Field linked to Life Orientation as a Learning Area

  • Sociology:  Social, Urban and Rural Studies / Social worker / Social Analyst etc.

  • Psychology:  All the principles of Psychology incl. Sport Psychology / Criminologist / Social Developer etc.

  • Political Sciences & International Studies:  Political Analyst / Diplomatic Studies / Journalism etc.

  • Labour Studies & Industrial Sociology:  Labour Relations / Arbitration & Conflict Management etc.

  • Human Movement Science & Sport Science: Sport & Recreation / Bio-mechanics / Bio Kinethetist / Sport Marketing and Financial Management etc.

Career Guidance and Counselling

“Education serves as a vehicle for cultures and values, creates an environment where socialization can take place and is the melting-pot in which common purpose takes shape.” 

(Delors et al 1996:53)

 

 As a part of the Life Orientation Curriculum, we offer specific and focused Career and Aptitude assessment and guidance to all our students.  This takes place in three formal phases:

Grade 9:     Full aptitude assessments are done with all the students to provide guidance and assist them with Subject choices for the FET Phase.

Grade 11:     Individual sessions are arranged during Term 2 and again in September to assist the students in establishing and achieving their academic goals for University application in their Grade 12 year.

Grade 12:     Formal individual sessions are held with all the students during Term 1 and again at various times throughout the year as required by the students to provide career specific guidance and assist them with current information and guidance for Universities / Colleges applications for their Tertiary studies and options for the next year.  This includes application to international universities, colleges and/or structured Gap year options.

Physical Education as part of Life Orientation

Physical Education is an integral part of the Life Orientation programme up to Grade 12, but is referred to as:

  •  Grade 8 and 9 - LO4: Physical development and movement

  •  Grade 10: In the new CAPS Physical Education as Topic 6, but further aspects is also included in Topic 1  and Topic 2

  •  Grade 11 and 12 - LO3: Recreation and Physical well-being

This allows us the opportunity to include several theoretical aspects into the existing Physical Education syllabus e.g. sport as nation builder, to create a richer and more holistic outcome that should encourage continuous healthy living and life style choices.

“Education must, as it were, simultaneously provide maps of a complex world in constant turmoil and the compass that will help people find their way in it … to adapt to a changing, complex and independent world.”

(Delors et al 1996:85)

 




 







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Geography geography@dsg

Mission Statement

Geography is the relationship between people and the environment.

Introduction

Geography caters for a wide variety of abilities and interests, and is today an Environmental Science. It is an extremely topical, challenging and enriching subject which brings together many relevant areas of study in one discipline, eg. economics, meteorology, ecology etc. In addition, the important ability of decision-making is nurtured.

Course Outline

Geography in Grade 8

  • Types of settlement and their functions

  • Location and growth of settlements

  • Shapes and structures of settlements

  • Settlement patterns in South Africa

  • Trade and transport around the world 

  • The demand for trade and the development of transport

  • Transport and access to opportunity in South Africa

  • Wind


Geography in Grade 9

  • Concept of development

  • Resources and development  

  • Approaches to development

  • Science and technology for food production

  • Industrial growth

  • Community development

  • Weathering

  • Erosion and deposition

  • Human forces of erosion

  • Social Conflict

  • Conflict and the environment

Geography in Grade 10

Geographical skills and techniques

• Mapwork skills

• Topographic maps

• Aerial photos and orthophoto maps

• Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

• Using atlases

• Fieldwork

The atmosphere

• Composition and structure of the atmosphere

• Heating of the atmosphere

• Moisture in the atmosphere

• Reading and interpreting synoptic weather maps

Geomorphology

• The structure of the Earth

• Plate tectonics

• Folding and faulting

• Earthquakes

• Volcanoes

Population

• Population distribution and density

• Population structure

• Population growth

• Population movements

• HIV and AIDS

Water resources

• Water in the world

• The world’s oceans

• Water management in South Africa

• Floods

Geography in Grade 11

Geographical skills and techniques

• Mapwork skills

• Topographic maps

• Aerial photos and orthophoto maps

• Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

• Using atlases

• Fieldwork

The atmosphere

• The Earth’s energy balance

• Global air circulation

• Africa’s weather and climate

• Drought and desertification

Geomorphology

• Topography associated horizontal and inclined strata

• Topography associated with massive igneous rocks

• Slopes

• Mass movements and human responses

Development Geography

• The concept of development

• Frameworks for development

• Trade and development

• Development issues and challenges

• Role of development aid

Resources and sustainability

    • Using resources

    • Soil and soil erosion

  • Conventional energy sources and their impact on the environment

    • Non-conventional energy sources

    • Energy management in South Africa

Geography in Grade 12

Geographical skills and techniques

• Mapwork skills

• Topographic maps

• Aerial photos and orthophoto maps

• Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

• Using atlases

Climate and weather

• Mid-latitude cyclones

• Tropical cyclones

• Subtropical anticyclones

• Valley climates

• Urban climates

Geomorphology

• Drainage systems in South Africa

• Fluvial processes

• Catchment and river management

Rural and urban settlement

• Study of settlements

• Rural settlements

• Rural settlement issues

• Urban settlements

• Urban hierarchies

• Urban structure and growth

• Urban settlement issues

Economic Geography of South Africa

• Structure of the economy

• Agriculture

• Mining

• Secondary and tertiary sectors

• Strategies for industrial development

• Informal sector

Skills Taught

The Geography syllabus is structured to teach a number of skills, which are transferable to work and life situations.

Speaking and literacy: logical thinking, speaking with assurance and accuracy, arguing and debating.
Numeracy: statistical methods, graphs and tables.
Interpretation: of pictures, photographs and maps.
Problem solving: at a variety of levels.
Information: analysis, interpretation and synthesis.
Awareness of the environment.

Examples of Assignments and Projects

Grade 8
Know your Globe, Building a contour model, Data collection: Weather Station.

Grade 9
Rocks that Rock, Land Use Zones in Pretoria, Map Analysis

Grade 10
Natural Disasters, Global Warming, Water Masses in South Africa, Population Data Analysis

Grade 11
Climate Change, Geological History of South Africa , Developmental Issues

Grade 12
Portfolio research assignment

Practical component
Mapwork is introduced in Grade 8 and continues through to Grade 12.

 Assessment & Examinations

 Grade 8 - 11: Continuous assessment occurs during the year which will be used to calculate the learner's CASS mark. This includes worksheets, tests, projects, assignments and examinations.

Grades 12: Each learner must complete a portfolio during the year. This includes worksheets, projects, assignments, tests and examinations.


ONE RESEARCH TASK PROJECT 2014


GEOGRAPHY: SBA Requirements


Candidates doing One Research Task

Component

Weighting

 

Research Task

45%

45%

Two controlled tests

15% x 2

55%

Midyear or Preliminary examination

25%

Candidates doing the Three Alternate Tasks